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Slang Names

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by Doc Raider, Oct 18, 2002.

  1. Doc Raider

    Doc Raider Member

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    The recent slang posts go me a thinkin.....

    GIs had lots of derogatory slang for the enemy - Krauts, Jerries (although I think Jerry was more of a brit term), nip, etc. Does anyone know of any other good ones, or derogatory names for allied soldiers?

    The only other I know, and I don't know the French term, is something like "grey worms" for the germans. It had something to do with the uniform color and the fact that they came to France and ate everything up like a worm...but I unfortunately can not remember the whole story.
     
  2. Doc Raider

    Doc Raider Member

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    Oh yeah, and us calling brits limeys and french frogs....I have no idea of the origins for those, though.

    Were americans ever anything but yanks?
     
  3. De Vlaamse Leeuw

    De Vlaamse Leeuw Member

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    The Belgians (in Flandres that is) called the Germans "MOFFEN" and in Holland (I think) "FRITZEN"
     
  4. Bish OBE

    Bish OBE Member

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    Calling the French frogs is an English past time, as well as giving them the two fingured salute.

    As i understand it, the term Yanks only applies to those from the North. Whats the reason for this.

    Almost forgot. Box Heads is another term we have for the Germans. No idea why.

    [ 18 October 2002, 12:30 PM: Message edited by: Bish OBE ]
     
  5. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    As far as I'm aware, eating or drinking habits are often the basis -

    'Limeys' came from English sailors in olden times eating limes to combat scurvy

    'Frogs' is from the French liking for frog's legs as a delicacy

    'Krauts' comes from Sauerkraut...

    And so on....
     
  6. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    I know that "Ami" is a term that Germans used at somepoint to referr to Americans. :D I was told it was a derogatory term from one person and from another it was just short for American--and wasnt meant to be a bad term.

    I dont think that Russians minded being called Ivan--which the Germans AND Russians both used. :cool:
     
  7. Doc Raider

    Doc Raider Member

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    Oh, always wondered about limey, but now it makes total sense!!

    Forgot about fritz for the germans, too.

    My uncle said that they called the italians "lovers" since they never actually seemed to fight.

    And of course tommy for brits, but I'm not sure where that came from.
     
  8. Bish OBE

    Bish OBE Member

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    I wounder if that comes from Kiplings poem, Tommy Aitkens, or if thats were he got the name of the poem from.
     
  9. sommecourt

    sommecourt Member

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    In WW1 US troops of the AEF were called 'Sammies' by the French, because of Uncle Sam; indeed, but many older French people they are still known by this phrase!
     
  10. sommecourt

    sommecourt Member

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    I wounder if that comes from Kiplings poem, Tommy Aitkens, or if thats were he got the name of the poem from.[/QB]</font>[/QUOTE]In the mid-19th century Wellington was asked to come up with the name of a common soldier, a typical name, so that this name could be used in the paperwork of the Army Act to show young officers how to fill in forms (nothing changes, eh Bish?!); Wellington replied 'Thomas Atkins' - a brave soldier who had served under the Lord in the 33rd Regiment in India.

    Thus the name stuck...
     
  11. Bish OBE

    Bish OBE Member

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    And then i guess thats where Kipling got it from.

    And you are right, nothing changes :D
     
  12. Doc Raider

    Doc Raider Member

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    Wow!! That's really cool! Thanks!
     
  13. Greenjacket

    Greenjacket Member

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    In a previous century, during the Peninsular War a British nickname for the French was 'Crapauds' meaning literally 'Toad'

    There was a nickname for the Americans (don't know if its an American or foreign name) in WWI which was 'Dough Boys'.
     
  14. Doc Raider

    Doc Raider Member

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    Yeah, I've hear two explinations for "Doughboys". For one, I heard it was because the buttons on their overcoats looked like doughnuts. The other was that these fresh guys came over to eurpe, and the battle-weary Europeans that saw the fresh faces thought that they all looked fat!!!
     
  15. Panzerknacker

    Panzerknacker New Member

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    Come on----no-one has mentioned 'Diggers' for the best fighting troops the world has ever seen...The Australians!!! :D
    I don't know where that term comes from though-actually I think I do, but I can't remember! :rolleyes:
     
  16. Carl G. E. von Mannerheim

    Carl G. E. von Mannerheim Ace

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    You all forgot the best one: "Waps" aka "Whops", "wops," for our greasy Deigo friends.

    The Italians!
     
  17. Doc Raider

    Doc Raider Member

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    That's what digger means!!!!!! I knew it was something in the "British" army, didn't know it was actually Austrailians!!! Cool!!!
     
  18. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Well, I found a book on which it said that the US called the Hitlerjugend soldiers " crack babies".Anybody heard of this as well?
    :confused:
     
  19. grafvonschlitz

    grafvonschlitz recruit

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    For "Doc Raider"...the term, "Limeys" for Brits and, "Frogs" for the French is directly related to their diet. The British Navey used limes to counteract Skervy (?), a disease that plagued sailors and was caused by a lack of vitamin C.....and the French....it was probably during WW I, when American soldiers returned from the war....and of course, the French ate frog legs....even more interesting, a History Prof of mine once told our class that if our doughboys of WW I had fought in Poland, the term today in America for deep-mouth kissing using tongues...would have been, "Polish kissing", instead of "French kissing"...because it was a common practice in all of Europe....just not the good old, US of A!!! Love history.
     
  20. coloradocowboy

    coloradocowboy Member

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