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Some nice pics of the weapons used by the British in WWII

Discussion in 'Allied Light Weapons' started by The Alerted Beast, May 16, 2017.

  1. The Alerted Beast

    The Alerted Beast Member

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    Another set of pics, this time British weapons. I haven't seen Enfield No. 2 MK I Revolver, Boys Anti-Tank Rifle, and Jungle Carbine used in WWII video games I've played. Has anyone used one of them in video games? If so, please tell me which video game.

    1. Mills Bomb (No. 36 Mark 1 Grenade)

    upload_2017-5-16_14-31-4.png
    2. Sten Mk II

    upload_2017-5-16_14-32-5.png

    3. De Lisle Commando Carbine

    upload_2017-5-16_14-32-52.png

    4. Bren Light Machine Gun

    upload_2017-5-16_14-33-41.png

    5. PIAT (Projector, Infantry, Anti Tank)

    upload_2017-5-16_14-34-49.png

    6. Rifle No. 5 Mk I (Jungle Carbine)

    upload_2017-5-16_14-36-49.png

    7. Enfield No. 2 MK I

    upload_2017-5-16_14-40-10.png

    8. Boys Anti-Tank Rifle Mk I

    upload_2017-5-16_14-40-56.png

    9. No. 74 Sticky Bomb

    upload_2017-5-16_14-41-18.png

    10. Webley Mk VI

    upload_2017-5-16_14-42-3.png
     
  2. The Alerted Beast

    The Alerted Beast Member

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    Here's more:

    11. Short Magazine Lee-Enfield Mk III

    upload_2017-5-16_14-45-4.png

    12. Welrod

    upload_2017-5-16_14-46-0.png

    13. Webley Mk IV

    upload_2017-5-16_14-47-41.png

    14. Grenade No. 82 (Gammon Bomb)

    upload_2017-5-16_14-48-37.png

    15. Vickers-Berthier M1924 Light Machine Gun

    upload_2017-5-16_14-51-58.png

    16. Besa Machine Gun (Tank Mounted MMG)



    upload_2017-5-16_14-49-34.png

    17. Vickers K Machine Gun

    upload_2017-5-16_14-54-27.png
     
  3. Otto

    Otto No More Half Measures Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I remember a lot of these weapons in the Medal of Honor series. The Gammon bomb would have to be a less common one to include in games and my foggy mind remembers it there.
     
  4. Andy235

    Andy235 Member

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    I think number 11 was not an SMLE MK III but a Lee Enfield Rifle No. 4.
     
  5. harolds

    harolds Member

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    I second your opinion Andy235! it is a No.4(probably)Mk1. I have one of these.
     
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  6. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Correct. Its a Mk1 -- you can tell by the bolt release button under the rear sight. The Mk1* omitted this feature in favour of a small (~0.5") notch cut into the guide rail about 2" back from the chamber. This notch allows you to manually rotate the bolt head for disassembly.
     
  7. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Re # 17. I believe it shot the 7.9X57mm round, which of course was what the Germans used.

    Thanks for the "like" Andy 235!
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    What was the go-bang in the Mills bomb?
     
  9. harolds

    harolds Member

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    @ OP: It had an external spoon/striker mechanism, much like the "pineapple" grenade. When the spoon or lever was let loose a spring fired striker hit a 22 caliber cartridge, which started the fuse burning. The fuse was set at either 7 seconds or 4 seconds depending whether the grenade was to be fired from a rifle or hand thrown. The filling was 2.5 0zs. of Baritol. I hope this answers your question.
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Looking for "Baritol". BZ
     
  11. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large Patron  

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    I think it's actually spelled Baratol. From Wiki:

    "Baratol is an explosive made of a mixture of TNT and barium nitrate, with a small quantity (about 1%)[1] of paraffin wax used as a phlegmatizing agent. TNT typically makes up 25% to 33% of the mixture. Because of the high density of barium nitrate, Baratol has a density of at least 2.5 Mg/m3.

    Baratol, which has a detonation velocity of only about 4,900 metres per second,[2] was used as the slow-detonating explosive in the explosive lenses of some early atomic bombs, with Composition B often used as the fast-detonating component. Atomic bombs detonated at Trinity in 1945, the Soviet Joe 1 in 1949, and in India in 1972 all used Baratol and Composition B.[1]

    Baratol was also used in the Mills bomb, a British hand grenade."
     
  12. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    From Wiki: "According to Mills's notes, the casing was grooved to make it easier to grip and not as an aid to fragmentation, and in practice it has been demonstrated that it does not shatter along the segmented lines."

    I wonder if the same holds true for the American pineapple grenade? I've just assumed all my life that the segments on both types of grenades were to provide shrapnel. It has never occurred to me to question this. Anybody have any info on this?


    .
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Gunther Rothenberg told us that after TNT came into general use the need for fragmentation augmentation was no longer necessary.
     
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  14. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Yes KB. The same thing was true of our "Pineapple" grenades. The grenade casing would break up in irregular patterns with some pieces being rather large and others quite small. This means that if one goes off near, say, three enemy soldiers, one might be killed with horrible wounds, one might be slightly injured and one not hit at all. In order to have fragmentation along the segmented lines, the lines would have to be on the inside so that the explosive gasses get into the grooves.
     
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  15. harolds

    harolds Member

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    (SIGH...) I always waz a pour speler.
     

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