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South Alberta Regiment Memorial, Moerbrugge.

Discussion in 'WWII Today' started by Owen, Apr 13, 2008.

  1. Owen

    Owen O

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    Canadian member, Kieron Bridge, will know this one, his Dad was there in 1944.
    I was there back in October 2006.
    Thought you might like to see it as there seem to be rather alot of Canadians joining the forum of late.

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  2. Kieran Bridge

    Kieran Bridge Member

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    Hi Wessex,

    I've not seen this monument in person, although I was in Moerbrugge in 1980 and 1987. My dad later calculated that when I was there in 1980, I was the same age he was, within a couple of days, as he was in 1944.

    You will see Lionel Morgan's name on the plaque. He was a friend of both my parents, and probably saved my dad's life at the cost of his own by telling my dad to stay put while Lionel went to help silence a German machine gunner. A few moments later, Lionel stepped outside the house they were in and was killed a short distance away. After the battle, my dad helped bury him any many other lost comrades.

    Kieran
     
  3. macrusk

    macrusk Proud Daughter of a Canadian WWII Veteran

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    Thanks for posting this Wessex!
     
  4. Owen

    Owen O

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    Kieran posted this on ww2talk about his Dad & Lionel.
    Any luck contacting relatives of Christopher Jenkinson yet, Keiron?


    Lionel Morgan's grave.
    CWGC :: Casualty Details

    Name:MORGAN, LIONEL A.
    Initials:L A
    Nationality:Canadian
    Rank:Lance Corporal
    Regiment/Service:Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada (Princess Louise's), R.C.I.C.
    Date of Death:08/09/1944
    Service No:B/143115
    Additional information:Son of Reuben and Pearl Morgan, of Toronto, Ontario.
    Casualty Type:Commonwealth War Dead
    Grave/Memorial Reference:IX. B. 1.
    Cemetery:ADEGEM CANADIAN WAR CEMETERY

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    I have photos of all the Argyll's mentioned on that memorial.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Sandie

    Sandie recruit

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    Hi,
    The memorial is also for eight other regiments including The Canadian Grenadier Guards (My Father was Cpl. E Arundell). The inscription reads (I think) 'From War Forge Eternal Peace'. There are two ceremonies that I know of each year that take place there. The smallest takes place on the Saturday prior to the larger ceremony at the Canadian Cemetery at Adegem. I have had the privilage of attending that ceremony twice as well as the one at Adegem. Recently I returned to the Canada Museum at Adegem to hand various pieces of my Fathers uniform into the safe keeping of Gilbert Landschoot the wonderful curator of the museum! I wonder if anyone else has visited the museum and what their views are.

    Sandra:)
     
  6. macrusk

    macrusk Proud Daughter of a Canadian WWII Veteran

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    Some information on the action at Moerbrugge:

    Battle of the Scheldt :September-November 1944 - Part 1: The Leopold Canal

    In September 1944, following the rout of the German armies from Normandy, the allied armies of the U.S., Britain and Canada surged eastward from France into Belgium. While reaching the Rhine was their main focus, attention was finally given to the liberation of Antwerp, a port that could handle the vast logistical supply necessary for three armies on the move.

    Although the city of Antwerp had fallen to the British, the docks had not been cleared, and the approaches to it along both banks of the Scheldt River were strongly held by the vaunted 15th German Army, who were determined to prevent the Allies from making use of the port of Antwerp. Until the mouth of the Scheldt estuary was closed, Antwerp–60 miles inland–was of no value.

    German General Gustav von Zangen, commanding 15th Army, issued an order declaring that: "the defence of the approaches to Antwerp represents a task which is decisive for the further conduct of the war.”

    First Canadian Army had three divisions under command: 4th Canadian Armoured (including the Polish Armoured), and the Second and Third Infantry: in all, some 50,000 men.

    Fourth Canadian Armoured was ordered to clear a crossing of the Gent Canal at Moerbrugge. The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders of Canada, supported by the Lincoln and Welland Regiment, struggled for the objective for three days, with heavy casualties.

    On the morning of Sept. 10, the engineers completed a bridge. The tanks of the South Alberta Regiment joined the infantry and began flushing the enemy from houses and haystacks.

    The division was next ordered to do an immediate crossing of the Leopold Canal "to keep the Germans on the move." The Canadians discovered they were fighting an enemy whose well-organized delay actions and determination revealed just how committed the Germans were to defending the approaches to Antwerp. The Algonquin Regiment had 28 killed, 40 wounded and 66 taken prisoner. The German counterattack employed all available resources, but the Algonquins held on.

    The Canadian Grenadier Guards with the Lincoln and Welland Regt. on board led the way to Maldegem on the morning of Sept. 15. The enemy was gone and they continued east past open fields where one day the Commonwealth War Graves Commission would establish the Canadian military cemetery at Adagem where 848 Canadian and 298 Polish and British soldiers lie.

    Adapted from an account by historian Terry Copp, published in Legion Magazine (www legionmagazine.ca)

    The Canadian Battlefields Foundation battle bursary student Katie Bunting, University of Ottawa Honours History, visited Adegem in 2005. These are her comments:

    “My favorite war museum we visited was the Canadian Museum in Adegem-Maldegem. It was built and opened by Mr. Gilbert Van Landschoot in 1995. He had promised his father on his deathbed to create a tribute to the Canadians who had liberated them and to share their war experiences with the younger generations. Over 40 years had passed since their liberation and still no commemoration had been made. Creating the Canadian Museum became Mr. Van Landschoot’s mission. As he spoke to us, his eyes shone brightly and he was incredibly animated. His pride in the museum was contagious. All of the artifacts had been donated and the variety and completeness of the collection was impressive.

    “I wish every Canadian had the opportunity to visit the Canadian War Museum in Belgium. The importance of Canada’s contribution and sacrifice is celebrated so sincerely and passionately. It warmed my heart and filled me with pride.”


     
  7. macrusk

    macrusk Proud Daughter of a Canadian WWII Veteran

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  8. ArcticWolf

    ArcticWolf Member

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    Very interesting post.

    My Dad Trooper Moise Amyotte served with the South Alberta Regiment(A Div). He's 90yrs old to this day :)
     
  9. Richard Griffin

    Richard Griffin New Member

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    My Dad was a Trooper with South Alberta Regiment i wonder if they knew each other.
     

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