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Stalag 12A to 9B

Discussion in 'Western Europe 1943 - 1945' started by xsoftail, Jan 22, 2017.

  1. xsoftail

    xsoftail New Member

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    I have read many explanations as to what this means, [SIZE=11pt]Stalag 12A to 9B Limburg An Der Lahn Hessen-Nassau, Prussia 50-08. [/SIZE]
    From my own research, it means in transport from one Stalag to another.

    I have been following the bootsteps of Pfc Rudy F. Seaberg #[SIZE=11pt]35607059 from his college years to the Battle of the Bulge. With the aid of the morning reports, unit journals and the after incident reports, I've been able to pinpoint Seaberg's last mission before his capture by the German Army. [/SIZE]

    [SIZE=11pt]PFC Rudy F. Seaberg, #35607059 35th Inf Div, 134th Inf Reg, 2nd BN, Company F, fought a battle to push the German Army out the little town of Lutrebois, Belgium. Co. F was sent into the woods to flush the German Infantry out. On their return to their original position, they Company was hit by a German shell, killing 8 or 9 of the soldiers. Seaberg was reported MIA on the morning report and confirmed as POW on 01/01/1945 by the Red Cross.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=11pt]It is from this point the bootsteps get cloudy. I have read accounts of marches east toward the German boarder in 2 feet of snow. The POWs would be hidden in barns, cellars and in the thick woods. One account said they finally boarded into cattle cars, arriving at Stalag XIIA for processing. This is very well possible as Seaberg's 1st card home was dated 01/29/1945, 2nd dated 02/13/1945.[/SIZE]

    [SIZE=11pt]The Allies crossed the Rhine and and moved rapidly east across Germany. Seaberg, with many other prisoners of Stalag 12A, were loaded in cattle cars to move east to Stalag 9B. This is substantiated by a local newspaper article which said, "An American medical officer liberated from a prison camp says that Seaberg died in enemy hands on a train enroute to the German interior".[/SIZE]

    Many unmarked train cars were strafed by Allied air. This is what the family was told had happened. I've read Tony Ancevedo's account of his escape from a POW train. He survived, but other escapees were shot. I've also read about the POWs who removed their shirts and used their backs to form P-O-W. I've also read where wounded POWs were transported to a local hospital.

    One final piece of information, Pfc Seaberg died March 28, 1945.

    Seaberg is listed as POW in records and DOW in others, contradicting to say the least. The Red Cross will only do research if they are connecting family members. The only thing the NARA shared was the report of the Red Cross inspection at Stalag 9B.

    Where can I find POW information? Is there any agency (US or other) that may have this information?

    Thank you in advance.

    xsoftail
    Struthers Fallen Soldier Project
     
  2. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Stalag XIIA (or 12A) was, for the most part, a temporary camp. Most POWs that went there were only there for a short time before being shipped off to other more permanent camps. So, I don't believe the description "Stalag 12A to 9B Limburg An Der Lahn Hessen-Nassau, Prussia 50-08" is intended to describe anything other than the particular soldier was at Stalag XIIA before being transferred to Stalag IXB.

    If you haven't done so yet, I would recommend requesting his OMPF (Official Military Personnel File) and his IDPF (Individual Deceased Personnel File). Due to a fire at NARA in 1973, many OMPFs were damaged or destroyed, but you should request it anyway. The IDPFs are a completely different set of records so you will get them, though it may take as much as 48 weeks to get a copy of the file if requested from the NARA. Using a researcher will be much faster, but will not be free as the IDPFs generally are through the NARA.
     
  3. xsoftail

    xsoftail New Member

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    Hi Tommy,
    When the NARA told me the these records were destroyed in the fire, I had the family request both the OMPF and the IDPF. The only thing returned to the family was the investigation report of Stalag 9B made by the Red Cross. As suggested by a researcher, I've requested both files and information from Military, but yet to get a response. I even contacted an agency in Germany, who suggested contacting the Red Cross.

    It's sad that the family had ALL records, medals, cards, letters, awards, etc. stored in a shoe box on a shelf in the basement. Over years of exposure to dampness and little hungry critters, everything was lost.

    I've been to the websites you suggested and others and have noted their information. Thank you for the suggestions.
    Denise
     
  4. Mutley

    Mutley Active Member

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  5. xsoftail

    xsoftail New Member

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  6. Hall83

    Hall83 New Member

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    Hello everyone, my name is Heather and I'm looking for more information about my Grandfather Wilmot C. Hall. He was a POW at stalag 12a to 9b limburg an der lahn hessen-nassau, prussia 50-08. I'm trying to find pictures or any information or anyone who knew him. Thank you everyone for your time.
     
  7. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Presumably, you have already seen his POW electronic record from the NARA: Hall, Wilmot C.

    I found a period newspaper which published a very brief letter which he sent home while a POW: Clare Sentinel, 8 June 1945

    Clare-Sentiel_8Jun45.jpeg
     
  8. Jaap Vermeer MDE

    Jaap Vermeer MDE Active Member

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  9. Jaap Vermeer MDE

    Jaap Vermeer MDE Active Member

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  10. Jaap Vermeer MDE

    Jaap Vermeer MDE Active Member

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  11. Jaap Vermeer MDE

    Jaap Vermeer MDE Active Member

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    The commander of Stalag 12A was Oberst Franz Pampert
     

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  12. Jaap Vermeer MDE

    Jaap Vermeer MDE Active Member

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  13. gs.dhillon

    gs.dhillon New Member

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    Hello,

    My father was a British Indian Army soldier captured in North Africa (June 1942) and was held at Stalag 12A (Limburg an der Lahn). He was liberated by the Americans in 1945. I want to visit the exact site of the POW site (if it exists) later this month - 22nd Aug).

    I will be grateful if anyone can help.

    Regards,
    Gurbinder
     
  14. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Here's a map of POW camps in Germany. It looks like Stalag XII-A was located just south of Limburg (see grid square A-3 on map).

    powcampsingermanymap.jpg
     
  15. Laurie Gehlsen

    Laurie Gehlsen New Member

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    My dad (Lauren Gehlsen) was captured in the Battle if the Bulge and was a POW at this camp. We visited the camp in 1980 and it was in use as a German Guard camp, whatever their psuedo-army is called. My dad asked for a tour and they took him through, he was able to see it all including the track down to the railroad where they had prisoners working. He was very moved by the experience.
     
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