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The Food of WWII

Discussion in 'WWII Activities and Hobbies' started by Jack B, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    I have no doubt that Spam and Eggs was a WWII meal. I've references to "Spam and Eggs" but no specific recipes. But, when I read that, I think of exactly what you made there. And bread and jam, too.

    While the Hickory smoke flavor wasn't available back then, I think that is an excellent example of wartime food. :thumbup:
     
  2. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

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    Yeah I threw the toast on there just to make it look good. :D

    Seriously the threads a great read and although I don't get too involved over cooking, there are times it pays off. Making the occasional 20-30 pounds of Venison Summer Sausage and 'sticks' is well worth the time and effort.
     
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  3. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    Definitely a change from the usual threads. Not sure if anyone has seen the new series starting on the History Channel "Eating History". Apparently the host will be eating foods from different times including C rations. I wonder if someone have been watching our thread???
     
  4. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

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    If things stretch into months which is a good possibility maybe we should start a WW2f podcast. I know we have members with the expertise to do something like that.
     
  5. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    That would definitely be an interesting idea. The way things have been lately it almost feels like we should be using stamps.
    Forget about finding toilet paper here in the East, I could not find just plain old chicken for three days this week. Finally yesterday (19th) the Purdue truck made a delivery. You think it was gold the way people were grabbing. When I made my way to the front the butcher growled how many I said "just one". It really confused him and he replied are you sure and I assured him I knew what I was doing. Now I am going to find a good recipe from the Victory Cook Book and will post. Since it is a whole chicken broken down it will be part soup and entree.

    Hoping we keep this thread going!
     
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  6. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    So I was getting into some real old school recipes but was having a very hard time convincing my wife to have Sunday dinner with me. I ended finding a recipe from the "Stove Pilot" recipe book that was compiled by the Women's Club at Maxwell Air Force Base in 1946 for the "Benefit of Overseas Recovery"?
    I know it is pushing the rules but under the circumstances of the current lock down I gave myself "Mulligan"
    Dinner was Puolet eu Casserole (Fancy way to say chicken with vegetables and mushrooms)
    Ingredients were simple Carrots, Oion, Wild Mushrooms, you could also substitute vegetables
    Recipe called for 1.5-2Lb chicken I just used the breast and the rest are being used for soup and a true WW2 Recipe
    cookbook2.jpg
    recipe2.jpg
    ingred 2.jpg
    second c 2.jpg last 2.jpg

    final.jpg
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2020 at 7:33 PM
    LRusso216, CAC and Jack B like this.
  7. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    That looks great!

    How was it?
     
  8. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    I thought it was a bit sweet with the sherry wine. My wife like the sweetness in faceted thought it could have used more. Funny, sherry wine is another one of those old school liquor. Big in snapper soup(which you don't see much any more) My 18 year old son refused to eat. He did eat the chicken noodle soup which I still need to post.
     
  9. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Ooh, I haven't had snapper soup in ages. Yes, a bit of sherry is a must in snapper soup! :thumbup:
     
  10. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Not big on sherry. What other liquid can be used? How much?
     
  11. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    If sherry is too sweet for your taste use a medium dry wine. Sherry used to be a common British cooking ingredient. Before the explosion of wine drinking by women, one common comedy meme was the tipsy house wife who had helped herself to the cooking sherry.

    Officers'messes and clubs used to have chili sherry to liven up bland soups. In Mansergh Barracks Officers Mess the chili sherry was kept in a sherry decanter affording practical jokers the opportunity to play a spicy aperitif related jolly jape on the unwary subaltern entertaining some official guest. :)
     
  12. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    The other one I will use next time will be Marsala. As far as how much? I used the three count use 1..2...3...stop pouring
     
  13. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    Many years back as a dishwasher we would be given the snapper after being boiled. Our job was to sit there and pick all the meat from the shell and the body. You could not smell off you for days
     
  14. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I don't do any alcohol. There's none in my house. Can water be used?
     
  15. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    Use a light chicken broth and some worcheshire
     
  16. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Did you bake it or cook it on the stovetop?
     
  17. Tricky Dicky

    Tricky Dicky Member

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    For chicken try adding Jura wine - Wikipedia

    Jura's most famous and distinguishable wine is the sherry-like vin jaune, its also nice to drink as a drink

    TD
     
  18. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Looks like the original recipe was 'cover and bake' in the oven. 'Moderate Oven' usually translates as about 350º-375ºF.
     
  19. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Active Member Patron  

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    Temp was 375 using a Convection Oven after sauté, I just covered the pan with a pizza stone that gave me a strong seal, only 15 minutes.I had boned the breast so that I could make a broth for the soup
     
  20. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Now that's a good wartime strategy!

    My father-in-law explained that when he was a kiddo (during the war) his family got three meals out of the chicken. Roasted one night, picked over for leftovers the next, and soup from the bones the night after that.
     

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