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The most iconic food from every state!

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by A-58, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude Patron  

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  2. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member Patron  

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    Though I don't live in Philly anymore, Jim's Steak on South Street was my favorite. Best beef out there. Onions with Whiz. Delicious.

    Here in CT I have never had a steamed burger. Meriden is only a couple hours from me so I may have to take a ride.
     
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  3. JJWilson

    JJWilson Well-Known Member

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    Well I've lived in 3 states in my lifetime, Nevada, Colorado, and Arizona, I was born in Nevada and we left when I was three, so I have a absolutely no recollection of my time living there at all. I lived in Colorado from the fall of 2004 to the spring of 2010, and I consider Colorado to be my home still, and I've lived in Arizona for 8 years now.
    For Colorado, I don't agree that lamb chops are the iconic food there, Venison burgers or steak is in just about any major restaurant in Colorado, lamb chops are more of a Denver thing. For Arizona, I'd say it's a very close race between Chimichangas and Carne Asada, both Latin influenced, I'd say Chimichangas is correct though,but I like Carne Asada more.
     
  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Banana Pudding. yeah, sounds okay, though I have never heard it called Old Hickory Banana Pudding.

    Given my interests in other areas, I can ride that horse, too.

    How about those Frog donuts, Bobby?
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2018
  5. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude Patron  

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    Beignets are most excellent, even after a power drinking all-nighter in the French Quarter. I was really surprised that the beignets (bain-yays) made the top spot on the list as Louisiana's most iconic food. Figured that it would be gumbo, etouffe, bisque, jambalaya, muffalotto or some sort of poboy as number one. Wasn't considering a pastry at all. But they sure are good.

    Jeff, you never had any with all the times you've been to Nola? When y'all come in for the Mardi Gras next year, there's a place called Coffee Call in town that serves up beignets and chickory coffee. Y'all should hit it on the way out.
     
  6. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Biegnets? Oh heck yeah. Had my first one 31 years ago on my honeymoon. We used to cook our own at home and eat them whilst drinking chicory coffee. Our fryer broke years ago and we've not made any since then
     
  7. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude Patron  

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    "Wilst?"
     
  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Patron  

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    I live near Philadelphia and have had many different cheese steaks, some good, some not so good. I'm not sure it represents the state, however. Scrapple is ideal. When I was in Georgia I had shrimp and andouille sausage on grits, even though it is supposed to represent South Carolina. Whichever, it was excellent.
     
  9. PzJgr

    PzJgr Drill Instructor Patron  

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    I would have gone with Brisket for Texas but fajitas...ok
     
  10. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member Patron  

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    How about pork roll Lou?

    taylor-ham-3.jpg
     
  11. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Scrapple is more a PA Dutch food, then a "state" food.

    For those who do not know - take all the things on a hog, that you would not normally eat, cook them, remove bones & fat, grind it all up, add cornmeal & seasonings, bake, eat.

    I've had some that was very good, and some that made me gag. Depends on where you go, or which family member prepared it.
     
  12. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

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    Brunswick stew is okay, I guess, as a commonly served dish, not something I eat more than once a year and only if I think about it. But (disclaimer, my family has been in southside, tidewater Virginia since 1640) were I looking for something "iconic" I'd propose Smithfield Ham. You can't get it anyplace else and any "Smithfield-styled" ham is just a cheap imitation.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
  13. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Patron  

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  14. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Patron  

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    Everything but the squeal.
     
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  15. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    And when were you in Jawja?

    Grits and Shrimp are all over the deep South. I'm not really sure how it can be a Palmetto State only thing. We eat it for Christmas Eve dinner and I prefer it made with a roux, although I have some made with a lemon-dill sauce that was good.

    Sounds sorta like a Yankee version of Hog-head cheese.
     
  16. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Dummkoff...That's Souse. Souse ain't Scrapple. Scrapple is kinda "meatloafish", but a somewhat different consistency.

    Boy, I'm feelin' a little Dutchy now once't.
     
  17. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Where I live, the terms souse and hog-head cheese are interchangeable.

    " take all the things on a hog, that you would not normally eat, " which is why I said "sorta".
     
  18. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    It's going back some decades to my deli days, but IIRC, Souse is pickled and hogs head cheese/head cheese is not. Don't quote me on that though.


    Agreed, the basic fixings are the same.

    To those unfamiliar...
    take all the things on a hog, that you would not normally eat, and mix it with clear J-ello. If you a familiar with Jello mixed with fruit. This is Jello mixed with meat.

    I always thought it looked disgusting, but people would buy it.
     
  19. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Head cheese - Wikipedia

    "In Mississippi, Alabama, and other southern states, it is encountered in a spicy form known as souse or less spicy hog's head cheese."

    Regardless, I don't eat it but have been at the table many, many times when my father did.

    Like I said, we used the terms interchangeably and since Tabasco was liberally applied no matter what, spiciness was a given.

    I remember we butchered a hog when I was a young lad. I did not realize they saved the head for later to be made into souse/hog-head cheese until I opened the freezer and it was in there, staring at me through a clear plastic bag. That was not the high point of my day.
     
  20. Half Track

    Half Track Active Member

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    Philly cheese steaks are good, any cheese steak is good for me. But then there are Mrs. T’s pierogies from up in the coal regions and of course Pennsylvania Dutch potato salad. And, I like my scrapple with maple syrup. All Pennsylvania favorites.
     

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