Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

The most iconic food from every state!

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by A-58, Jun 7, 2018.

  1. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow Patron  

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2011
    Messages:
    6,584
    Likes Received:
    937
    Location:
    The Land of 10,000 Loons
    Tater Tot Hotdish. Mmmmm-Mmm.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,505
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Michigan
    Some of those "iconic foods" make me cringe. Got some sort of virus warning before I finished but the foods for 2 of the states I've lived in i.e. Mississippi and Michigan hardly seemed iconic to those states to me. Indeed I'm not sure square pizza is common even in the Detroit area much less the whole state. The more I think on it especially with the diversity most states have I'm not even sure the basic premise makes any sense.
     
  3. harolds

    harolds Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,263
    Likes Received:
    138
    I was surprised to see what is called "Indian fry bread" listed as the iconic food for Wyoming. Many tribes claim it. I worked on the Wind river Indian Reservation for about 12 years so I know this food well! However, it is properly served with elk/buffalo/wild sheep stew! In a pinch prairie dog can be substituted.
     
  4. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    5,884
    Likes Received:
    1,388
    Location:
    The Arid Zone
    Alaska: King Crab Legs. I suppose so, but they're too damned expensive (even in Alaska) for most people to eat often enough to call them "iconic." King Crabs are only found way out west in the Aleutians and Bering Sea. The average Alaskan eats Bairdi Tanner crab legs (which can be caught anywhere) and are about half the size of Kings and 1/10th the price - and just as sweet. There's another type of Tanner crab called Opilio which are sold as "Snow Crabs" down south. Nobody eats those in Alaska because the legs are so skinny you'd starve before you got enough meat to sustain yourself. Commercial crabbers haul them in for sale in the lower 48, but there's no market for them in Alaska. If you walk into a restaurant offering "Alaskan Snow Crabs" do yourself a favor and have the halibut instead. The other crab that is discarded is Dungeness. I ran my own crab traps years ago targeting Bairdi Tanners and it was really disgusting to haul up a trap with a bunch of Dungeness that had eaten the bait before the Bairdi could get there. We'd just throw them back over the side, usually cursing as we did so. It's a lot of work hauling up a heavy trap only to find it full of dungies.

    All over coastal Alaska people will run their own ocean trap lines. You might check them every day, but most people bait and drop them on the weekend, then go fishing for the rest of the day - deep water for cod and halibut or trolling for salmon. On the following weekend they'll check their traps, re-bait them, and do it all over again.


    .
     
  5. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,505
    Likes Received:
    1,055
    Location:
    Michigan
    I really like Dungeness crabs.

    As to fry bread I once heard that in the exchange of tobacco for fry bread the Indians lost. (Fry bread was adopted by the various tribes from early contact with the whites). Given the incidence of diabetes and the high calorie content of fry bread it's likely that the health effects, at least percentage wise, on the tribes that have adopted it are worse than the health effects of tobacco are on the rest of us.
     

Share This Page