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Tonyrod's Poetry Collection

Discussion in 'Poetry' started by tonyrod, May 30, 2011.

  1. tonyrod

    tonyrod Member

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    pte 307255 frederick rodaway kia 18/8/1916
    4th bn kings liverpool
    caterpillar valley longueval

    Ive often thought and pondered to
    if i am the first to visit you
    from the family you left behind
    as you lay here in the ground

    what was you doing at your age
    fighting a war when your twice there age
    i would have thought you had more sense
    suppose it better than sitting on the fence

    your sons came home from that war
    and i guess they new the score
    they were hurting deep inside
    knowing you were left behind

    my granddad never spoke a lot
    of you his dad he loved so much
    so i thank you on this day
    the price for freedom you had to pay

    and has i gaze and look around
    at all your pals in the ground
    i wonder what life would have been
    without there sacrifice for the likes of me.

    i had the honour of visiting my great-grandfathers grave in
    September 2008 he was 47 years of age when he died

    WW1 - Rodaways of ww1-2
     
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  2. tonyrod

    tonyrod Member

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    THE GOOD OLD MOD AND GOVERNMENT

    IT SEEMS THEY ONLY LIKE A PARADE
    FLYING THE FLAG FOR THE FALLEN AND BRAVE
    HOW MANY ARE COMING HOME ON THERE OWN
    RELYING ON CHARITY'S NEAR THEIR HOMES

    BROKEN BODIES AND MINDS MOST WONT GET FIXED
    THE SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE LIST
    WE TOLD YOU ABOUT THE GURKHA'S YOU WENT ABOUT TURN
    WE ARE TELLING YOU ABOUT THE WOUNDED WILL YOU NEVER LEARN

    THERE IS A EASY WAY TO BALANCE THE BOOKS
    SEND HOME THE REFUGEES THE THIEVES AND CROOKS
    FORCE THE BANKS TO START PLAYING A FAIR GAME
    MINISTERS THROW AWAY YOUR EXPENSES CLAIMS

    THE VALUES OF THIS COUNTRY HAVE GONE DOWN THE DRAIN
    ALL THE DEAD BRITISH SOLDIERS ARE TURNING IN THEIR GRAVES
    WHAT DID THEY FIGHT FOR ALL THOSE BRAVE MEN
    FOR YOU LOT TO GIVE ARE COUNTY AWAY

    ITS NO GOOD SAYING YOU ARE TRYING YOUR BEST
    GIVE OUR TROOPS WHAT THEY NEED AND THEY WILL DO THE REST
    THERE WONT BE AS MANY COMING HOME IN A BOX
    JUST A FEW WALKING WOUNDED IN NICE CLEAN SOCKS

    TONYROD
     
  3. luketdrifter

    luketdrifter Ace

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    Great poem, tonyrod. Thank you for sharing
     
  4. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow Patron  

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    Wonderfully moving. Thanks for sharing it. I would have thrown you a salute if I had seen this sooner.
     
  5. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Am i the first?... a sad thought...Next time im at a war grave i think i might say G'day to ALL there...For some i may be the first...
     
  6. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow Patron  

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    Good thought, CAC. We should not assume that they have someone to remember them or their service.
     
  7. sunny971

    sunny971 Ace

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    very nice poem Tony. Your Great Grandfather would be proud.
     
  8. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    Very moving, thank you for sharing this with us
     
  9. Ron Goldstein

    Ron Goldstein WWII Veteran Patron  

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    The history books remind us that the Allied Army invaded Sicily on the 10th of July 1943 The British 8th Army under the command of General Bernard Montgomery, the American 7th Army under General Patton.

    On the 24th of July my unit, the 49th Light Ack Ack Regiment, disembarked North of Avola, Sicily as part of the 78th British Infantry Div. We arrived 14 days after the initial beach landings.

    This was my first taste of 'real war', as I had arrived in North Africa when virtually all the fighting was over and had seen the spoils of war without having actually to fight for them.

    Sicily was different in more senses than one, my most vivid impression was the constant blinding dust that our vehicles threw up as we made our way northward towards Messina, the springboard for landing in Italy.

    My schoolboy French, which I had an opportunity to practice in Algiers and Tunis, helped me learn Italian, and as I have always had a flair for languages, I was soon acting as unofficial interpreter in the bargaining that took place whenever we entered a village. The most common swap was our bully beef for their eggs, although it was not unknown for a fair amount of black marketing to take place with lira changing hands for cigarettes or clothes.

    One of the towns we passed through was called Adrano and the impression it made on me was sufficient to inspire the only poem I have ever written or am likely to write. Apart from a slight alteration to the last few lines it remains as I wrote it some sixty years ago and I print it here without comment.

    "Darkness was falling as we entered the town, but t'was light enough still to see

    The shattered ruins of what had been, a town, in Sicily.

    It wasn't much to call a town, compared with those of greater size.

    It wasn't built for modern war and now a stinking heap it lies,

    Rotting beneath the azure skies, of Sicily.


    It seemed as if an angry God had run amok with gory hands,

    Then dropped a veil, a canopy, of dirty, blinding, choking sands

    And as to wreak his vengeance more

    Had propped a body in each door


    We drove on by with sober thought,

    Of those poor bastards who'd been caught,

    We grimaced at the sick, sweet, smell,

    of this small piece of man made hell


    This could be you, the bodies said,

    This could be you, soon gone, soon dead

    We hurried by, enough to be,

    Alive that day, in Sicily"

    Ron
     
  10. Clementine

    Clementine Member

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    A salute to you, sir, for your poem...and for your service.
     
  11. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow Patron  

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    As Clem has said, thank you for your service and thank you for sharing your poem, Mr. Goldstein. I have been researching my great uncle's service. He served in North Africa and Italy as well, though with a US Tank Destroyer battalion. Your poem gives me an impression of what he might have experienced. Thank you.
     
  12. RabidAlien

    RabidAlien Ace

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    Excellent, both of them!

    ETA: CAC, I knew some folks back when I lived down in the Austin area who would go out to a local cemetery every Veteran's Day and Memorial Day, and put flags out on graves of military vets. Unfortunately, I was working in retail at the time and generally worked those days, so I never got the chance to go with them. I'd love to do that some time, though...
     
  13. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Im sure some never get visited...sad to think, laying there, seeing others turn up and pay respects...but no one ever stands in front of your grave...days and nights turn to years and still no one comes...thats wrong. We should give all what we expect for our fathers and brothers...as if they were...because they are.
     
  14. Colonel FOG

    Colonel FOG Member

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    Great poems. I had never thought that war was particulary poetic, other than the Charge of the Light Brigade. Thanks for opening my eyes a bit wider.
     
  15. Colonel FOG

    Colonel FOG Member

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    There I paused, but for only a moment.
    To see the glistening blood slipping from the muzzle and along my bayonet,
    Dripping on the ground.
    Wondering...
    How could the defense of all that is said to be right and just...
    Lead to my killing a man no less than me?

    Aged a thousand years, I paused again...
    To see the field of glistening white crosses
    Driven hard into the ground.
    Wondering...
    How many used their final breath
    To beg for mercy upon their troubled soul?
     
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  16. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Great effort! Have had similar thoughts...theres at least a couple more "verses" in there i reckon...Expand Heir Colonel...make me think...
     
  17. Colonel FOG

    Colonel FOG Member

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    Thank you. I haven't written any serious poetry for years, although I was once published long ago. I sort of miss doing it... hmmmm. :rolleyes:
     

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