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Tracing M-1 Garand history with serial number?

Discussion in 'Allied Light Weapons' started by Buten42, Jun 7, 2017.

  1. Buten42

    Buten42 Member Patron  

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    My brother-in-law purchased a Springfield Garand, serial number # 250955 and was wondering if there was any way to learn who might have been issued this weapon. Apparently it was made between 1943 and 1944 so it could have seen combat. The condition is about 90% and has the CMP stamp so doubt it seen much action.
    Any information would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Serial number 250955 would put production in June 1941. Production in 1943 started at 1.090M, ending at 2.420M. Production in 1944 started at 2.420M and ended at 3.359M.

    There's no way that I know of to trace the specific history. Weapon serial numbers may have been recorded at the small-unit level (platoon or company?) but I am unsure if these are readily accessible. Some others - RichTO comes to mind - would know better. I seem to recall a guy who would trace serial numbers of your particular USGI weapon ~10 years ago for a rather hefty fee, but I do not know what the methodology was or how successful it was.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2017
  3. Buten42

    Buten42 Member Patron  

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    Alan, I screwed up on the number, it's 2509855. But kinda thought that's what the answer would be.
    Thanks for the quick. Reply, Dave
     
  4. harolds

    harolds Member

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    The cartouches on the stock can give you some idea of whether the rifle is original or if it's been arsenal reconditioned or not. The cartouches can be found on line. IF that's original, which I doubt since most weapons have been reconditioned, it's worth a lot of money and probably hadn't seen combat. Combat firearms are usually really banged up. Most Garands, such as the one I have, end up a mishmash of parts, such as having a Springfield receiver and a barrel and/or trigger group of another manufacturer. I have never heard of any records showing what theater of war these guns went to, much less what unit they were issued to.
     
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  5. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Dave: That serial number would put it in January 1944.
     
  6. Buten42

    Buten42 Member Patron  

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    Thanks for the information, I'll pass it along to brother in law.p
     

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