Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Unknown artillery piece?

Discussion in 'The Guns Galore Section' started by liang, Sep 13, 2004.

  1. liang

    liang New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2003
    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    via TanksinWW2
    Anyone have any idea what the white-painted artillery is in the background? The calibre is probably 6 to 8 inch, but it is mounted on a tracter platform, similar to the Russian 8-inch howitzer. I don't think I have ever seen that kind of artillery before in the German or Russian arsenal, it's probably something American. Too bad I didn't take a close-up picture

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    11,708
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Luton, UK
    via TanksinWW2
    The hull / treacks look to be WW1 / 1920s vintage, probably US or British, but beyond that...
     
  3. me262 phpbb3

    me262 phpbb3 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2004
    Messages:
    3,627
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Porter,TX
    via TanksinWW2
    probably is a 19.4 cm Kanone 485(f) GPF, a french artillery from the mid 30's
     
  4. Skua

    Skua New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2003
    Messages:
    2,889
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norway
    via TanksinWW2
    Yes, I believe you´re right. Canon de 194 mle GPF sur Chenilles by its French designation.
     
  5. Patrice

    Patrice New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2004
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Liege
    via TanksinWW2
  6. Skua

    Skua New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2003
    Messages:
    2,889
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Norway
    via TanksinWW2
    And another picture of the same vehicle :

    [​IMG]

    Quite a sizeable gun for such an early SPG.
     
  7. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Messages:
    11,708
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Luton, UK
    via TanksinWW2
    Interesting that both Britain & France had tracked SP guns immediately after WW1, but by WW2 everyone had to learn that lesson all over again.
     
  8. liang

    liang New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2003
    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    via TanksinWW2
    Great picture, it looked very similar to the one I saw. It's definitely a heavy caliber, somewhere near 6-inch.
     
  9. corpcasselbury

    corpcasselbury New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2003
    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    High Point, North Carolina, USA
    via TanksinWW2
    I'll say! How big a crew did that thing need?
     
  10. Patrice

    Patrice New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2004
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Liege
    via TanksinWW2
  11. liang

    liang New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2003
    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    via TanksinWW2
    That certainly resembles the French gun. Perhaps the Germans were using captured French artilleries.
     
  12. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago
    via TanksinWW2
    I'll be damned if I can remember the full name,but the gun liang asked about is called a 'Puissance' something or other.
     
  13. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago
    via TanksinWW2
    According to a book I have,this gun is called a Grand Puissance,Filloux.GPF for short.It is almost identical to the Saint Chamond.However, the GPF is self propelled while the Chamond is not.
    For ID purposes,it appears that the GPF has a much longer gun.
     
  14. Roel

    Roel New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2003
    Messages:
    12,678
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Netherlands
    via TanksinWW2
    Isn't the St Chamond a WW1 tank with a long fuselage and a barrel sticking forward at dangerous looking overhang?

    How does it relate to this vehicle?
     
  15. Boba Nette

    Boba Nette New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2004
    Messages:
    3,142
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago
    via TanksinWW2
    OK,let's clarify this.The WW I tank is called a Saint Chamond.The artillery piece we're talking about is called 'The Canon de 194 Mle Saint Chamond sur Chenilles'Gee,I wonder why we're calling it simply Saint Chamond?
     
  16. David Lehmann

    David Lehmann New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Messages:
    78
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    France
    via TanksinWW2
    Canon de 194 mm GPF (L/33.5) (Grande Puissance FILLIOUX)
    Type : Tracked field gun (can easily fire at 360°)
    Speed : 8-10 km/h (Panhard SUK4 M2 engine, 120 hp)
    Crew : - men
    Caliber : 194mm
    Weight in action : 29600 kg
    Elevation : 0° to +37°
    Traverse : 360°
    Rate of fire : 1-2 rpm
    HE Shell :
    Max. Range : 20800 m
    Proj. Wt : 44.9 kg
    MV : 725 m.s-1

    The companion tractor carried 60 ammunition rounds. Only 50 pieces of this tracked SPA were in service in the French army in 1940. Several of these self-propelled guns were captured and used by German forces as the 19.4cm Kanone 485 (f) auf Selbstfahrlafette. There were for example 3 guns in the Army Artillery Regiment 84 in 1942 (Army Group North on Russia).

    Otherwise yes many French guns, tanks, vehicles etc. were used by the German army. The Atlantic Wall was full of booty guns. Even in 1945 you could still find some French tanks German units. Without all the booty from the 1940 western campaign the German army would not have been able to motorize the needed division for Barbarossa.
    Beside the booty trucks some 90000 new French trucks were also produced under the occupation between 1941 and 1944 and later 200 tanks were converted to artillery tractors in front of the harsh climatic conditions (mud etc.) on the eastern front.

    Regards,

    David
     
  17. scaramouche

    scaramouche New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2004
    Messages:
    933
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    via TanksinWW2
    Gentlemen! Apparently there are pictures of two different SP guns here- a look at the bore will tell you which is the 194mm SPG, but the one at Aberdeen proving Ground appears to be a St. Chammond 155 mm-which was one of the first SPs ever developed . It was a petrol-electric mount. Power was provided by a gasoline -powered tractor attached to the front of these the mount, while the barrel of the gun pointed over the rear. Here's a pic one of my friends took at Aberdeen Proving Grounds not too long ago
     
  18. liang

    liang New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2003
    Messages:
    830
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    via TanksinWW2
    Very nice, that's the picture I should have taken.
     
  19. scaramouche

    scaramouche New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2004
    Messages:
    933
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    via TanksinWW2
    Very nice, that's the picture I should have taken

    Was invited by a group of former grunts to visit Aberdeen on the way to Camp Le Jeunne- but had to pass on that. due to previous engagements ..Guess you know that Aberdeen is no longer an open base since 9/11....
    @#&*^%#@!!2##@![/i]
     

Share This Page