Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

US II Corps in North Africa, Relief of Fredendall

Discussion in 'North Africa: Operation Torch to Surrender of Tuni' started by 4th wilts, Jul 26, 2008.

  1. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    do we know who took over command of 2 corps after patton,in tunisia.cheers,lee.
     
    Johnesgef likes this.
  2. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,321
    Likes Received:
    2,038
    Location:
    Alabama
    Omar Bradley
     
  3. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    thanks jeff,do you happen to know when,because patton would i presume would need quite some time to plan the sicily invasion.yours,lee.
     
  4. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    does anyone know who took over direectly after fredenhall was given the boot?,what date was fredenhall sacked?,what date did his sucessor take command?,cheers.
     
  5. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,321
    Likes Received:
    2,038
    Location:
    Alabama
    George S. Patton relieved Fredendall as the commanding officer of US II Corps 6 Mar 1943.
     
  6. Carl W Schwamberger

    Carl W Schwamberger Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2007
    Messages:
    1,051
    Likes Received:
    81
    Patton offcially took over from Fredenhall. Robert Harmmon was the defacto comander during the latter half of the 'Kasserine Pass' battles. Eisenhower sent him to investigate the deteriorating situation and gave him orders to relieve Fredenhall and take over if necessary. Harmmon did not formally releive Fredenhall, but instead issued several key orders to the Corps staff, then reported back to Eisenhower after several days. Ike then appointed Patton commander and Bradley his deputy, making it clear that Patton would soon return to the Operation Husky planning after a few weeks. Pattons 1st Armored Corps HQ had previously been part of the planning staff fpr the US portion of Operation Husky
     
    USS Washington likes this.
  7. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    So if Ike relieved fredenhall,that means Ike was in command.is that correct?.
     
  8. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    In June 1942, Eisenhower was appointed Commanding General, European Theater of Operations United States Army (ETOUSA) and was based in London. Prior to that he was assigned to the US Army General Staff in Washington under General Marshall. In November 1942, he was appointed Supreme Commander Allied Forces of the North African Theater of Operations. In February 1943, his authority was extended as commander of AFHQ in the North African area to include all Allied forces, including the British 8th Army, commanded by General Montgomery. Late in 1943 Ike was appointed by FDR to be Surpreme Commander Allied Expeditionary Forces instead of General Marshall.

    So to answer your question if Ike was in command when Fredenhall was fired, I'd have to say yes he was.

    Inspired by wiki....
     
  9. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    Thanks for clearing that up.Most sites put Gen.K.e.n.Anderson in command of the American forces in Tunisia,under the first army.cheers.
     
  10. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    The US 2nd Corps which comprised the the 1st, 3rd, 9th, and 34th Infantry Divisions and also the 1st and 2nd Armored Divisions (a very big corps!) was assigned to the British 1st Army under General Anderson. In turn, 1st Army was under Ike, including Fredenhall. Ike obviously stepped out of the chain of command when he sacked Fredenhall, but being the HMFIC has it's priviledges. Otherwise it would've ruffled feathers and complicated the matter if Anderson did it don't you think? I think the right thing was done, although a bit late.
     
    4th wilts likes this.
  11. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    I think I'll go along with that man,but I wish the web sites should make it clear that Ike did command an all be it large u.s corps in Tunisia,before patton,Bradley and Alexander .
     
  12. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    It is a not too clear set-up. Seems that on paper that it belonged to Anderson and 1st Army, but with some degree of control of Ike (after Kasserine). That's my assessment anyways.
     
  13. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,321
    Likes Received:
    2,038
    Location:
    Alabama
    I would have to look it up, but I think that Atkinson in An Army at Dawn, painted the picture that Anderson wanted Fredendall gone but felt it would cause much more problems between the two nations if he was the one to pull the trigger, instead of Ike. I think Anderson was correct in that assessment. With Ike being the one to do what was definately needed, it solved a lot of problems by showing with deeds that anti-British behavior would not be tolerated. I read somewhere that it was acceptable for a US officer to call a British officer a bastard, as long as he did not call him a British bastard,or something to that effect.
     
  14. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    I read pretty much the same thing in the past, but couldn't place it. An Army at Dawn does sound familiar though. It's been awhile since I read it, the early 90s or so.
     
  15. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    Cheers Gents,I reckon your assessment is smack on.I think this is a very good discussion that I've enjoyed very much,Lee.
     
  16. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Same here friend, glad to help. Now I'll be heading for Barnes and Noble to see if I can track down a copy of An Army at Dawn on my next stretch of days off.
     
  17. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,321
    Likes Received:
    2,038
    Location:
    Alabama
    Go to it or Amazon and look at the used copies. I've bought books that were rated "excellent" and they looked brand new.
     
    4th wilts likes this.
  18. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    1,399
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    okie dokie
     
  19. 4th wilts

    4th wilts Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    952
    Likes Received:
    29
    I think I'll get that book too,cheers for the info and heads up.lee.
     
  20. Jon Jordan

    Jon Jordan Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2010
    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    8
    After February 16, the OOB was:

    AFHY (Eisenhower)
    15th Army Group (Alexander)
    1st British Army (Anderson)
    II U.S. Corps (Fredendall (till 6 March), Patton (till 16 April) and Bradley (till 2 September - he commanded it in Sicily as well)

    II U.S. Corps answered directly to Alexander during Patton's and Bradley's tenures. Above is correct - Alexander suggested to Ike that Fredendall should have been fired, but he didn't officially ask for Fredendall's relief. Ernest Harmon recommended the relief of Fredendall, and Patton took over. Bradley was AFHQ's "eyes and ears" at II Corps HQ, but Patton would not countenance Ike's spy so he called AFHQ and got Bradley reassigned as his deputy commander. (Truscott I think took over Bradley's "official spy" role; Everett Hughes and John Lucas did this at times as well.)
     

Share This Page