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Walter Marlowe, 101st Airborne Division

Discussion in 'Honor, Service and Valor' started by Slipdigit, Jun 26, 2009.

  1. macrusk

    macrusk Proud Daughter of a Canadian WWII Veteran

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    Thank you, Mr. Marlowe, for sharing your experiences with us. Having recently seen the beaches, the terrain, as well as various memorials and cemeteries - I realize how much it must cost you to tell us of your experiences in June 44. I have a 23 year old step-son, and I imagine him as you speak of being 22 years old and leading men into combat - which none of you would probably have experienced before. I look forward to your future posts.
     
  2. Malarkey

    Malarkey recruit

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    Yep, excellent!;)
     
  3. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Just catching up on this thread Mr. Marlowe. As always, it's both a pleasure and an honor to read your posts. Thanks for doing this for us.
     
  4. cpt chaos

    cpt chaos Member

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    just joined this forum and enjoying reading your accounts mr marlowe

    hope all is well and look forward too reading more
     
  5. W Marlowe

    W Marlowe WWII Veteran

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    Ladies and Gentelman:

    the 7th was spent improving our battle position around Heisville. We were the divisions reserve and were charged with protecting division HQ.

    On the 8th we had an officers call and we were briefed on the Carentan Attack. The plan called for a route march and a cleare of small towns between us and Hiway N 13. They were held by the Ist Bn of FGR6 and two Ost Battalions. The plan was for all four(4) infantry units to assualt Carentan at once. The 502nd would secure the line of departure by the evening of the 9th. The Assualt would begin on the 10th of June The 3rd Battlion commanded by Col. Cole woud lead. Col. Cassidays 1st would attack the seaward side of Carentan and we woul have naval gunfire support. The 327th would cross the Douve downstream from Carentan and drive for the town of Isigney ( my guys called Easy Knees) and meet the 29th Division coming from Omaha Beach the 501st would cross upstream from carentan and secure Hill 30 to Cut FJR6 supply route.

    Our eveningm was a hot meal and everyone drew ammunition to bring each rifleman up 240 rounds and six grenades. We also added six belts of .30 cal machinegun ammo for each weapon. assembly was scheduled at 04.30 hours.



    I hope to get into the attack on next post.

    As Ever,

    Walter L. Marlowe

    ( Airborne all the Way):confused:
     
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  6. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    Thank you again for all your contributions, both here on the forum and in the service of America.
     
  7. Jirkal

    Jirkal recruit

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    Dear Mr. Marlowe, thanks for sharing your memories with all of us. I was wondering, if you could tell us about lieutenant colonel Steve Chappuis and his participation during the Normandy battle, did you met him well?
    Again, thank you very much for your comments!
     
  8. W Marlowe

    W Marlowe WWII Veteran

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    JIRKIL;

    i first met Col Chappius in December of 1942 along with a half dozen new officers. For the Record the Col . was an Honor Graduate of the ROTC program at LSU in Baaton Rouge ,La. He was commissioned into the Regular Army prior to WW II. He was known as Silent Steve and by the Battle of the Bulge he was our Regimental Commander aand after our relif at Bastogne the Col received the DSC from General George Patton.

    He was a hifghly respected officers but a no nonsense person. I was delighted to have served under him in both of his capacities.

    As Ever,

    Walter L. Marlowe

    ( Airborne All the Way);)
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Good morning Mr. Marlowe. Nice to see you posting again. Looking forward to more of your exploits and musings.
     
  10. surfersami

    surfersami Member

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    Mr. Marlowe, I had asked this of another vet from are allied ranks, wonder if you might consider the same questions?
    Was there a weapon the Germans had that you feared more than others, or were there a particular group of Germans behind the weapon that made it bad?
    Were mines feared more than the infantry soldier?
    Praying you are well,
    John
     
  11. W Marlowe

    W Marlowe WWII Veteran

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    Surfersami:

    If you have read my postings you will note that I thought highly o f the FGR6 unit. Many of these troopers wore the Krete Armband on their tunics. After the Battle at Hill 30 the suvey team was able to recover weapons on the battlefield. They found FG 42 Rifles and Gehewr 43 simiautomatic rifles with help explain the volume of fire they couls lay down. They were handicapped with a bad supply rout and tended to run low on ammo as a fire fight dragged on. They were reasonable marksmen and smart tactically. They were 1st class opponents and most of the time militaryly correct. I would hate to have to attacked them very often.

    As Ever,

    Walter L. Marlowe

    ( Airborne all the Way):)
     
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  12. Jim932

    Jim932 Member

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    Mr. Marlowe,
    I recently joined this forum and I am really enjoying your stories. I want to thank you for all that you did for our country and I am looking forward to your next post.
     
  13. WW2GrandDaughter

    WW2GrandDaughter Member

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    Mr. Marlowe,

    Yours is the only posting I have seen that mentions the 502nd. Is this who you were with? Did you know many people in the 502?

    Thank you and God bless!
     
  14. Triple C

    Triple C Ace

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    Hi Walter,

    A quick question: How did small groups of paratroopers take care of their wounded and POWs, if the group was separated from the parent unit due to being dispersed by the drop?
     
  15. W Marlowe

    W Marlowe WWII Veteran

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    WW II gand daughter:

    You may noticed that the army was bashful about using me. But I always seem end back with 502nd. When became amember of the division association the only unit I mentioned was the 502nd. They are on my Life Membership No. 431. They and are a very proud regiment.

    As Ever,

    Walter L. Marlowe

    ( Airborne all the Way)
     
  16. surfersami

    surfersami Member

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    Thanks for the response, did you encounter the 88mm gun much? That was the weapon that Sapper mentioned in his post that really stood out.
     
  17. W Marlowe

    W Marlowe WWII Veteran

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    SUFERSAMI:

    The 88mm Flakkannone was extremly accurate but its HE round was light and unleathal. I have seen rounds impact between trooper in a skirmish line and not hit anyone now their 81mm morter were a different kettle of fish.

    Thank for your comment,

    As Ever,

    Walter L. Marlowe

    ( Airborne all the Way):)
     
  18. asjones

    asjones recruit

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    Mr.marlowe, I am a 27 year old nurse and mother of 2 who is completelt infatuated with ww2. It is really my only hobby. My uncle (with whom Iwas very close) never would talk about the war much with me despite my intense interest even as a child. (He was a medic in the pacific fleet). This left a gaping hole and I have searched for a ww2 vet to befriend and just talk to, to complete this hole in me. I love and respect every one of you men. And thank you from the bottom of my heart. If you or any vet u know, would like a 27 year old girl to befriend and enlighten on your war and your world, I would be forever greatful. I want to pass your stories to my children, so the future will never forget the bravery that brought us our freedom. If you ever have time, I would love to just say hello. (amandasjones@live.com) (by the way my husband is in 20th SF out of birmingham (airborne) and I'm proud to say he's a fellow jumper :)
     
  19. Triple C

    Triple C Ace

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    Hi Mr. Marlowe,

    Do you feel infantry armed with a combination of semi-automatic and automatic rifles (FG 42/G 43) actually have an advantage in firepower over troops equipped with bolt action rifles and LMGs(K 98/MG 42)?
     
  20. WW2GrandDaughter

    WW2GrandDaughter Member

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    Mr Marlowe,

    Did you know a SGT. Hale? 101st, 502nd, C company. I believe the word "proud" is an understatement. :) They were quite a group and sadly, not many of them made it home ot tell their story.
     

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