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Weathering?

Discussion in 'World War 2 Hobbies' started by Zhukov_2005, Jun 10, 2004.

  1. Zhukov_2005

    Zhukov_2005 New Member

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    I just started a Tamiya M48 "Patton" model and was hoping to put it into a Vietnam diorama. The problem is that I have no idea how to weather the tank so it looks worn and beat up. On previous models I did, I usually side stepped the weathering process but on this tank, weathering is a must. So if any one has any advice or tips on how to make this tank look like its been thru hell, that would be extremely helpfull. I guess I should mention I'm on a limited budget also...

    Thanks!
     
  2. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    To show worn paintwork - drybrush with silver or aluminium on selected areas (especially on areas that are regularly walked over, etc.). But go easy on the drybrushing!

    To show scraped-off paint - like where a hatch is opened, or a turret turns - use a silver pencil, well sharpened.

    An all-over gentle drybrush of white is always good.

    Oh - a good tip is to practice weathering first!

    As far as mud etc goes, I'm not too sure...
    I tend not to do mud, myself - too tricky!
    One tip is 'weathering powders' - a range of various-coloured powders (mostly shades of mud, rust etc) that can be applied with a paintbrush or cottonbud (Q-tip to the Americans!).
     
  3. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    I prefer water colours to powders myself, because it´s easier to blend water colours. They also have a nice and flat finish which emulates mud or rust nicely. Wont do much harm to your wallet either, you´ll do fine with a water colour set from a toy store.

    And it´s easy to wash off if you mess it up or overdo it.
     
  4. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Hey - that's a very good idea - I'll have to try that!
    :D
     
  5. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    Water colours have one disadvantage to powders though which I forgot to mention; They don´t apply very well to gloss or even semi-gloss surfaces. The surface has to be flat. And I believe a semi-gloss varnish was used on American tanks post-WWII, not sure about the Vietnam War though.
     
  6. Greg Pitts

    Greg Pitts New Member

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    I use a white primer first of all on all items. For the most part, I use artists acrylic paints which allow me to mix any color I need.

    Utilizing a wash of one color over another works. (Light wash over dark color or dark wash over lighter color). Some of my friends actually use artist oils, and use cotton balls to apply a darker color over a light primer.

    It takes experimentation to get the effect you want.

    One note: if you want to bring detail out on a figure, use Penguin's Brown Sepia Ink. You will have to experiement with dillution. Dip the brush, brush it on. If it's too dark, dip the brush in water and go back over it. You will get the hang of it after a few times.

    Have fun!
     
  7. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    As with all of these techniques - Practice!

    Where can one buy Penguin's Sepia Brown ink?

    I would assume art equipment shops?
     
  8. PanzerProfile

    PanzerProfile New Member

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    Should be OK, I guess. Maybe you can try the painting 'department'of your modelshop. I can't see which one from here, though :p
     
  9. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    My local modelshops closed down long ago.
    My nearest is the next town over (6-8 miles). The best locally is a lot further than that...

    I have no car.

    :cry:
     

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