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What are you reading? (Non-WWII)

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Otto, Jan 7, 2007.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    I thought it idiotic being there in the Ifor/Sfor troops and see how the Serb troops said they only could trust own troops ever. At the same time their own commanders used the black market to suck the money into their own pockets. However NATO was needed as the UN could not use guns to make peace. The serbs just laughed as the UN Ordered the bombing stopped. They just kept on loading and sending planes to missions. Not read the book but definitely about the UN and Europan forces weakness.
     
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  2. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member Patron  

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    Forgot about this thread.

    As the summer approaches I usually like to recharge the battery with a nice piece of classic literature. I was going the Hemingway route this year. Though I have read some of his work, which I enjoyed, I would like to revisit. What do you believe is his best work?
     
  3. RRA227

    RRA227 Member Patron  

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    My copy of HAPPY and THE 100 came in at the bookstore. Also got Books.jpg some WARHAMMER.40,000. Rich A. in Pa.
     
  4. rkline56

    rkline56 USS Oklahoma City CG5 Patron  

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    Thank you, Kai.
    Your observations are always appreciated.

    This incident at Pristina is most interesting. As is Jackson's quote to General Clark upon refusing his order to block the runways. "I will not start WW III for you!" At which point he volunteered to resign rather than carry out unwelcome orders.

    Incident at Pristina airport - Wikipedia
     
  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Footfall, Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, 1985. First off, the aliens aren't humanoids with appliques on their foreheads. The war that results when they come to claim "Winterhome", (Earth) is replete with the latest weaponry of the time, but neither humans nor thipt have wunderwaffen, so the battles are believable. And the characters are well fleshed-out, and they represent several types of both groups. The fundamental differences in thinking present what would seem to be an insurmountable obstacle to any kind of peace. The resolution to that surprised and impressed me way back when I read it for the first time, and stands up well today.
     
  6. rkline56

    rkline56 USS Oklahoma City CG5 Patron  

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    IMO "For Whom the Bell Tolls"

    Preferred John Steinbeck or Poe to Hemingway.
     
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  7. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude Patron  

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    I'm working on this now.


    [​IMG]


    Pretty good read, an excellent look into the Doughboys in WW1. I'd say it would be the definitive work-up for them, but my WW1 reading is very limited. Got interested in reading about that war after reading about Mac's exploits there when he was with the Rainbow (42nd) Division. Then I was onto to General Fox Conner, now this one. Highly recommended for those looking to bone up on how the Army (and Marine Corps) was formed up, trained, shipped, supplied, supported, fought, lived and died in the trenches.
     
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  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I read that years ago. Niven and Pournelle were great sci-fi writers who were based in reality.
     
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  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Read his short stories. They are very good.
     
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  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Robert Heinlein called The Mote In God's Eye "the best first contact novel ever written."
     
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  11. Terry D

    Terry D Active Member

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    I am reading/have recently read a bunch of non WWII stuff.

    1. Civil War: Harry Pfanz,The First Day at Gettysburg (excellent in every way), Glenn Tucker, High Tide at Gettysburg (well written but accepts too many legends and gives too many excuses for Confederate defeat)
    2. British Army in WWI: Passchendaele, Peter Hart and Nigel Steel (very good), Ypres 1914, Anthony Farrar-Hockley (fine volume in the Pan British Battle series), Old Soldiers Never Die, Frank Richards, A Passionate Prodigality (classic combat memoirs), Tommy, Richard Holmes (comprehensive anatomy of the British Army on the Western Front, superb book)
    3. Several Raymond Chandler novels: Farewell My Lovely, The Lady in the Lake, The High Window, The Little Sister, all brilliant.
     
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  12. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Read that, too. I remember it being very good. Probably worth a re-read.
     

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