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What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. ColHessler

    ColHessler Member

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    Now there's a collector's piece.
     
  2. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    Gambling With Armageddon by Sherwin...about the Cuban Missile Crisis
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Photos....
     
  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I finished
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    about two weeks ago.

    Danger's Hour, The Story of the USS Bunker Hill and the Kamikaze Pilot Who Crippled Her, Maxwell Taylor Kennedy, Simon & Schuster,2008. 476pp plus end notes. Large number of photographs and diagrams. Few, if any, maps.

    As indicated in the title, Danger's Hour chronicles the kamikaze attack on the USS Bunker Hill on 11 May 1945 that put her out of the war. While the book thoroughly discusses the actions by the ship before, during, and after the attack, it also looks closely at one of the two pilots that struck the Bunker Hill that day, Ens Kiyoshi Ogawa.

    The book was very readable and seemed to have well researched, both talking with surviving principal crew of the ship and friends and families of the crew and pilot. At times the author seemed to go into too much depth about subjects that seemed to detract from the overall story, such an overly lengthy discussion of the biological response to severe burns.

    Basic diagrams of the ship help to keep the reader on track as to where the losses occurred and the large number of photos, of both the US and Japanese, helped to tie the reader back to the subjects of the book.

    8/10
     
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  5. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I just finished
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    Bowfin, Edwin P. Hoyt, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, Inc 1983 225pp, many photos and patrol maps.

    I guess the best way to describe this book is a biography of a fleet submarine during WWII. It was written by a third party to the boat and lacked description of much of the daily life onboard the boat. Descriptions of combat action read heavily as though gleaned from the patrol reports, which they were. The story describes the patrols in depth, but sometimes tended to make my eyes glass over. This was not often, and over all the book was a good read, although not as enjoyable as such books as Clear The Bridge, reviewed earlier in this thread.

    7/10
     
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  6. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I am now reading:
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  7. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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    I just finished “Big Week”, about the biggest air battle over Germany in World War II and now will start this one. I read slowly and have a varied interest. May read some on pirates, sports stories or biographies and also have one on World War II at sea that I never read and on the battle of Midway. After a few books on the same subject, I may become bored and need a change. I could probably get through a book faster if I could stay off the internet.
    58F75B5E-44FD-40A7-9E3E-FECF7450554E.jpeg
     
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  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    dam busters.jpeg

    Just started this. Engrossing.
     
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  9. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    As usual, Australia gets overshadowed (rarely spoken about) by the Brits...Dam Busters no exception.
    "Many of the 133 airmen involved that fateful night hailed from Australia, and several would be counted among the 56 who would not return to base next morning."

    I think some commando snipers should have been included in this enterprise. Two on either side of the dam up on the hill/mountain sides. Dropped in days earlier by parachute, they make their way to the dams and set up for the night. With sirens blaring, machine guns going off, and everyone focused on the on coming Lancaster, it would be conceivable that the Germans would not even be aware of the sniping. The snipers would concentrate on the light operators and heavy machine gunners. They would have made short work of them i'm sure. Then melt away back into the countryside to be picked up a couple of nights later by Lysanders...

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    Last edited: Sep 13, 2021
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  10. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    and
     

    Attached Files:

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  11. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    I read Tiger Bat. 507 a while back and found it useful. Yesterday I reread Pegler's Sniping Rifles On The Eastern Front 1939-45.
     
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  12. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I finished
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    a couple of days ago.

    D-Day Plus One, Shot down and On The Run In France, Frank, "Dutch" Holland, with Adam Wilkins, Grub Street, 2007 250 pp, photos. ISBN 978 190494 393 8

    This an autobiography of Typhoon pilot shot down on the 7th of June, 1944, west of Caen. He evaded capture for 70 days, living among and with French farmers. Initially he was hidden in barns and the like, but eventually was transferred away from the fighting to a family that had a small house detached from the main living quarters, where he initially hid. A few days later, refugees from Caen passed through the town, and he mixed in with then to appear to be a refugee that had family there. He was able to move around openly, even talking regularly with German soldiers. He knew enough passable French such that while the local knew he wasn't French, the Germans did not.

    Over all, it was a interesting story and I liked reading about the British point of view. The book could have used a bit more editing and polishing, but overall he told a good story.

    7/10 Interesting, but needed a bit more work on the manuscript.
     
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  13. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The front page looks a bit misguiding but stories like this make the whole ww2 more whole in the end. The more you read the more you understand. Read the lesser known detail sections if you have the time for example. So much details from so many books.
     
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  14. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  15. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  16. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  17. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Just finished Fighting Hitler from Dunkirk to D-Day . Author was part of the BEF that was booted off the continent at Dunkirk, fought in the Western Desert as part of the 51st Scottish Division. Fought all the way to Holland. Back to Corti's Few Returned.
     
  18. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Janissaries, Jerry Pournelle. Ever wonder where those MIAs that are never found really go? Easy, they got hired to do work elsewhere, like in a different solar system.
     
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  19. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    I read that decades ago.
     
  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ditto, but now my free time allows me to wander long forgotten byways, perhaps to find that lost love I squandered as a youth.
     

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