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What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. Stevin

    Stevin Ace

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    Hmmmm....well.....ok, a little kick then....a little slap on the wrist...

    Still, there are so many others that could (should?) take precedent over SH... even in the fiction arena. But that is own humble opinion.

    May I suggest A Bell For Adano by John Hersey? Fictional, yet WW2 related...
     
  2. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Yep - Hassel's books are pretty dire but I know how Stefan feels ; too much 'heavy' reading can seize your brain up..... :(
     
  3. Stefan

    Stefan Cavalry Rupert

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    Exactly, a book of quality requires brain power, hense reading something poor means reading something mindless ;)
     
  4. Stefan

    Stefan Cavalry Rupert

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    Damn double post!
     
  5. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

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    I own Sven Hassel's "SS General"… haven't had the stupidity-time to read it… :rolleyes:

    Have too many books to read to waste my time. Better some Asimov and classic novels to distract the mind.

    Even after neuro-surgery I still have a fresh mind because I don't fill up my mind with Nietzsche! [​IMG]
     
  6. Stefan

    Stefan Cavalry Rupert

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    Are you saying I need neuro-surgery to sort myself out? Hmm, if I had known it was going to be this tough I would have just read Mill in the first place.

    I am going to read SS General next, though I have sort of given up on March Batallion as it is rather, whats the word, dull?
     
  7. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

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    No, all I say is that too much Nietzsche —in the same way as too much Freud— can affect your mind… :confused:
     
  8. Stefan

    Stefan Cavalry Rupert

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    Thank heaven, though I still worry that reading Nietzsche has had permanant effects on my brother (he has even started to grow a tash :confused: )
     
  9. chromeboomerang

    chromeboomerang New Member

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    Am currently reading Cactus air force & also a book on the British train robbery that caused such a sensation. Ex German military were involved in financing the operation. One of the Brit guys involved went to Octoberfest to lift wallets, & was caught. While in jail he befriended an ex SS man who turned him on to an organized crime boss in Germany. Also am half way through a book called 3 came through about 3 people caught on Borneo during war & spent 3 &1/2 yrs in interment camps.
     
  10. FramerT

    FramerT Ace

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    Almost finished "Waffen-SS Panzer Battles in the West". "The Fall of Eben Emael" is my next read.
     
  11. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

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    Got these two books with 30% off to-day:

    "I flew for the Führer" [Ich flüchte für den Führer] by Heinz Knoke, 1957.

    "Red Snow" [Solik - Tribulations d'un jeune polonais dans la Russie en guerre] by K. S. Karol, 1983.

    "The Cause of All my Life" [Pelo vsey zhiszni] by Marshal of the Soviet Union A. M. Vasilievski, 1975.

    Has anyone of you read these? How good are them?

    :confused:
     
  12. drache

    drache Member

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    Currently reading Loza's "Fighting For the Soviet Motherland." Reasonably good so far.
     
  13. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Finally completed and Padfild´s Himmler book...

    Urgh...I feel so good now! Enough good to start another book:

    Martin Pöppel "Heaven and Hell"

    [​IMG]

    And to follow with:

    Langerbein: Hitler´s death squads

    After the war, the German government investigated 1,770 former Einsatzgruppen members and brought 136 of these men to trial. Helmut Langerbein has systematically examined the trial evidence in search of characteristics shared by these mass murderers.

    http://www.tamu.edu/upress/BOOKS/2003/langerbein.htm
     
  14. Mahross

    Mahross Ace

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    I have just picked up 'The Eye in the Air' by Peter Mead.
     
  15. Onthefield

    Onthefield Member

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    Just picked up Bedford Boys from the library and it's good so far.
    A definite eyewitness account but a good read and emotional learn.
     
  16. Mussolini

    Mussolini Gaming Guru WW2|ORG Editor

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    I am reading An Army At Dawn - about the US Forces in North Africa. Pretty good read so far - and i have learned some interesting facts. Like in Scotland, where they didnt have any boats, troops would walk across an imaginary sea and 'land' at an imaginary beach.
     
  17. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Mussolini-see the "military archaeology thread" for some stuff on that....
    BTW, there were plenty of boats, but to ensure secrecy there were dozens of "Atlantic Walls" built inland to maximise the amount of training available.

    Regards,

    Gordon
     
  18. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Just finished reading "A Taste of Freedom-Stories of the Italian and German prisoners who escaped from Prison Camps in Britain in WW2" (London. Arthur Baker Ltd.1964).
    As well as covering the more famous wartime attempts like Von Werra etc, the book also covered some post-war escapes as well. The one I loved was the story of the POW who escaped to East Germany, escaped from a Russian cage to Dublin....then decided life was too quiet, so he went to Belfast and joined the RAF under an assumed name! He got away with it too... when he eventually "deserted" to Dublin and wrote to his CO confessing, he was flatly disbelieved. The story ended with him quietly being discharged from the RAF!
    A great book, and still available second-hand. Only things it misses are a bibliography and a list of camps though.

    Regards,

    Gordon
     
  19. Onthefield

    Onthefield Member

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    I just also picked up Marching Orders by Bruce Lee. Supposedly the first book to come out that states the true usefulness on the Magic/Enigma codes...anyway got an opinion on this?
     
  20. Friedrich

    Friedrich Expert

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    Now reading "The Third Reich" by Michael Burleigh and Eric A. Johnson's "Nazi Terror". Even a deeper in-sight on Nazi Germany. :cool:
     

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