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World War Two Cameras

Discussion in 'Information Requests' started by mike134, Apr 18, 2010.

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  1. mike134

    mike134 recruit

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    Hey guys i was hoping someone could help me with this one. what cameras did are military use on the beaches of Normandy, Iwo Jima, etc.
    thanks for any help
    Mike
     
  2. sniper1946

    sniper1946 Expert

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  3. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    kodak35militarymodel (ldtomei)
    Military Graflex, Speed and Crown Graphic cameras
    Mixed bag, mostly postwar, but there's other excellent reference on Cameraquest:
    Military 35's

    US Anzio photography company:
    Dogface Soldiers : Fuzzy's Folly
    Good start on German Kriegsberichters:
    Waffen-SS Kriegsberichter Photographers

    Compiled a little stuff on Japanese Cameras here.
    (I've one British Ensign Commando model that was allegedly issued to Officers to capture shots of the state of Germany immediately postwar, but I'm somewhat dubious about that provenance.)

    Etc.

    I'd expect Contaxes & Rollieflexes for the big boys (brace yourself if you fancy buying a WW2 Contax - not cheap, though Rollei's can be found for more attractive prices), along with Kodak 35s and a smattering of other makes for 'miniature' action stuff.
    The Speed Graphics are quite substantial cameras, likely more for general shots when the heat's died down a bit, but there have been some striking action shots captured with them. I wouldn't want to lug one of the things if I had to run though.

    If I remember I may trawl Mckeown's Guide later for other 'official' military models.

    Sorry for rambling on - I'm an old camera nerd ;).
    ~A
     
    scarface and kerrd5 like this.
  4. kerrd5

    kerrd5 Ace

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    Old camera nerds never die. They just snap away. :)


    Dave
     
  5. kerrd5

    kerrd5 Ace

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    I found this Signal Corps photo at the NARA in January:

    Caption reads:

    "Pfc Joseph B. McCoy, Rochester, New York,
    Signal Corps Photographer recommended for
    Silver Star and Purple Heart. (Port Moresby, New Guinea)

    Date: 23 June 1944.

    Photographer: T/5 H.W. Guyon.

    III-SC 258497, Credit NARA.


    Dave
     

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  6. Spaniard

    Spaniard New Member

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    One of the most famous Pictures taken on D-Day were shot by Robert Capa. He was using "several Contax cameras" one was a 35 mm Contax and a 6x6. His Pictures from the actual D-Day landing are fairly blurry.

    The D-Day Photos of Robert Capa

    Robert Capa used a Zeiss Ikon Contax II or IIa 35mm rangefinder for his famous shots on Omaha Beach. There were also a lot of Graflex Speed and Crown Graphics cameras used by military photographers.

    Navy Officers issued, Kodak Medalist cameras, with a large rangefinder that shoots a 6x9 neg, documenting navy life. Many Marines Photograpers also used The Kodak 35. the Kodak PH324 in dark colors for the US Army Signal Corps. If you Google a lot of references.

    [​IMG]
    Photographers from the 3rd Signal Company, 3rd Infantry Division.

    http://static.photo.net/attachments/bboard/00L/00LKN8-36748484.jpg

    photographer named Joe Rosenthal shot the most memorable photograph of World War II, a simple, stirring
    image of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the flag at Iwo Jima.
    Fifty Years Later, Iwo Jima Photographer Fights His Own Battle

    Rosenthal hurried toward Suribachi, lugging along his bulky "Speed Graphic camera."
    Joe Rosenthal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Marine combat photographers

    [​IMG]


    Description

    Marine combat photographers on Iwo Jima, note the Winchester M12 trench gun .(rudeerude)
    US Marines - Marine combat photographers

    During the Iwo Jima invasion, Lieutenant Howard W. Whalen, USNR, an officer of the attack transport Sanborn (APA-193), used a Leica 35mm camera to take ...
    www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/OnlineLibrary/.../iwojima/iwo-3w1.htm


    Iwo Jima Operation, February - March 1945
    -- Howard W. Whalen's Color Photographs of Pre-landing Bombardment, circa 19 February 1945

    During the Iwo Jima invasion, Lieutenant Howard W. Whalen, USNR, an officer of the attack transport Sanborn (APA-193), used a Leica 35mm camera to take several rolls of Kodachrome color transparencies showing various aspects of the operation. Among these are views of boats and ships offshore, the pre-landing bombardment of the island, the assault landings, the beach area following the landings and a few other subjects. Though some of the photographs look southward toward Mount Suribachi, and others were taken offshore with no land visible, most show the vicinity of the "Blue" Beaches, northernmost of Iwo Jima's eastern landing beaches. It was there that Sanborn's boats and amphibious tractors (LVTs) put Marines and supplies ashore during the 19 February 1945 amphibious assault.

    Iwo Jima Operation -- H.W. Whalen's Color Photos of Pre-landing Bombardment, circa 19 Feb. 1945


    During WWII the Soviet military photojournalists usually used Fed's and Leicas usually with standard lens.
     
  7. kerrd5

    kerrd5 Ace

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  8. scarface

    scarface Member

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    ....or, in some obvious cases, they just 'snap'!

    (.... not mentioning any names, though...... no-o-o-o, I'd NEVER do that!....)



    -whatever

    -Lou
     

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