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WWII time travel or a hoax?

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Class of '42, May 10, 2020.

  1. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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  2. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    It would make a great story if they rebooted the Twilight Zone, otherwise its hokum.
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Lordy, lordy, lordy.
     
  4. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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  5. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    We've been time travelling since 1978 if you are into this stuff...
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Get in a time machine. Turn it on. "Go ahead" fifty years. Look around. Earth has moved in its orbit and the whole solar system has moved a great distance in its travel around the galaxy. Hope you brought a space suit.
     
  7. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    True but time is also space...”space-time”...there should be fixed points in space and therefore time...calculations or a homing device would be needed.
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    More fun when they leave that out, however. :p
     
  9. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    It has been "explained" that instead of flying back to Drem, he actually flew to Renfrew, an active civilian airfield 70 miles from Drem, which had similar aircraft, as well as brightly painted civilian a/c. Also, the civilian mechanics would not be wearing military dress.

    However, nothing is known for certain, but Renfrew would mostly fit the facts as described by Goddard.
     
  10. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    I have not heard this explanation, but it makes sense. Then so does it being a urban legend. Urban legends seem to have regional variants and in this case, 'time slips' always seem to include aircraft.
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "The Man who walked around the horses." Blown all out of proportion as bullshitters grabbed the reins.
     
  12. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Goddard is not an urban legend though. He talked about it several times, although the first recorded instance was 16 years after the fact.
     
  13. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Trouble is, Renfrew is on the opposite side of the country to Drem. Surely an experienced flier would have known he was way off course; Scotland's not that big.
     
  14. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Opposite side of the country is relative in no visibility. The distance is only 70 miles, not that far when one is lost in a storm.

    On occasion pilots have landed at the wrong airport in good weather...What was that one that put down on a much smaller airfield some years ago.
     
  15. Carronade

    Carronade Ace Patron  

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    IIRC both German and British pilots occasionally landed on the wrong side of the English Channel.
     
  16. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    And Japanese pilots tried to land on US carriers in confusing battles.
     
  17. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Occam's Razor applies.
     
  18. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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  19. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    We getting a little far afield here, so thread moved to FFZ.
     
  20. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Nah, don't believe it.
    1) This guy had just successfully navigated 335 miles (flying) North, from an airfield at Andover in Hampshire, in the South of England, to just South of Edinburgh. He then decided to detour 16 miles East of Edinburgh and "gets lost" in wild weather?
    Moreover, it then states he "managed to find his way back to Andover". That would make it a return trip of 670 miles. He was flying a Hawker Hart, which had a range of 430 miles. Where did he land to refuel? Even if he hadn't got lost, he would still have been very low on fuel by the time he made RAF Turnhouse.
    Hawker Hart - Wikipedia
    2) Drem is in East Lothian, near the sea. There are no mountains for him to be "afraid of crashing into". Renfrew is West of Glasgow, nowhere near the coast and now the site of Glasgow airport. There are no mountains anywhere near it either. Hills, yes, but no "mountains".
    3) The Hart was a two seater aircraft; why is he the only person mentioned? At the time he was Deputy Director of Intelligence at the Air Ministry; wouldn't that have been a non-flying role?
    Not arguing that he didn't have a clairvoyant episode,but whoever wrote that piece has embellished it way beyond what actually happened.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2020

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