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Anti-Japanese Sentiment

Discussion in 'Post War 1945-1955' started by ladymage, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Hey it's great that he is proud of his heritage, anyone for that matter. It goes to show that sometimes a little common sense and courtesy to reign in such displays after being informed that everyone doesn't necessarily feel the same, especially after experiencing Imperial Japanese hospitality. The Rising Sun still carries a very negative connotation with many people who are still alive and a lot of countries that had the misfortune of being in the way of Japanese intentions in the 1930s and 40s. When it was pointed out how offensive his symbol of choice was to his co-worker, he should've shown a little maturity and consideration and removed it at least while they worked together. But he didn't, so he had to deal with the consequences of his actions. Lesson learned, move on. He's lucky that he only got his tie clipped. It could've been worse. He could've gotten the "3 Stooges treatment", which would have been much more embarrassing. I still think that what transpired was appropriate. It would've been better if it didn't happen though.
     
  2. Owen

    Owen O

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  3. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Maybe it's just offensive to a veteran of the PTO if a Jap(anese) person wears it then. It doesn't tick me off just by seeing it, but having it flaunted in some peoples faces that had bad dealings with it in the past, it obviously it does.
     
  4. Owen

    Owen O

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    We've got a Honda plant here.
    When it opened back in 80s anyone we knew who worked there got a lot of stick.
    You can guess the type of comments workers got.
    I wouldn't want to work there.
     
  5. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    A while back there were two older local guys that spent Saturday afternoons in the local watering hole, sipping a few beers, watching the game on TV, chit-chatting amongst themselves, that sort of thing. Two old skinny grandpas, weather beaten farmers, that type. They'd slide in,park at the bar, drink 3 or 4 beers then go home before it got dark. One day the conversation at the bar got around to WW2 because there was a shoot'em up on the tube. They didn't jump into the conversation on their own, but one of the other regulars mentioned that the two old guys over there fought in the war. They were asked the usual questions like "what were you in, did you see any action, did you kill anybody, blah, blah blah". One of them got up and left, and the other one stuck around, and said that they were together in the Philippines before the war started. They fought on Bataan, surrendered, and spent the rest of the war in a POW camp on Luzon. He didn't get into a lot of gory details, and glossed over their experiences. He says they got beat on a lot, but some of the guards weren't as brutal as the others. He was assigned to the mess hall for awhile, and smuggled food out to his friends (and the other old guy who got up from the bar and left). Once he said he held his face over a pot of boiling water for several minutes, then went to one of the guards and told him was too sick to work. His face was very red and wet, and I guess the guard thought he had malaria and sent him back to their hut for the rest of the day. Little victories like that kept them going. Also he said that nobody tried to escape from his group, because at that time the Japanese was shooting men from the rest of the group in retaliation. They were too weak to make it long on the outside anyway, and they didn't know where they were at either. They knew the war was coming back to the islands because they noticed a lot of different types of aircraft in the area buzzing around. One morning, they got up and saw that the guards skedaddled in the night. Soon a tank ran through the front gate and a lot of soldiers came running in. They thought that it was a new Japanese unit that was going to kill them before pulling out. They didn't recognize the uniforms or weapons since they all wore khaki and carried Springfield Rifles in 41-42. It turned out to be US troops that had broken through to liberate them. They just stood there, dazed and bewildered because the Japanese kept telling them that the Americans were far away, and now they had been rescued to their amazement. He didn't get into too much more detail, other than they ate like kings and got 1st class medical treatment before being sent home. They were still little more than scarecrows by the time they returned, but they were home. Their folks were told that they were listed as missing in action. Imagine the homecoming they got. Neither one ever bought a Japanese vehicle, and none of their kids did either. The grandkids, well they broke tradition they said. They grumbled, but that was about it. They didn't display much overly anti-Japanese sentiment, but you could tell they neither one of them thought highly of anything Japanese.

    Talk about a mood changer at the bar.
     
    green slime and Owen like this.
  6. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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  7. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Well we were told that wearing a tie was a requirement. If he didn't have another tie with him asking him to take it off in violation of the rules was a bit over the top wasn't it? Certainly getting physical would have been. From the discussion it's not clear why Bill found it so offensive either. I can see it if he had been a POW but that didn't sound like it was the case. I've known vets from the Pacfic war that didn't seem to carry anywhere near that big a chip on thier shoulder not to mention the former Grand Master of the Tang So Do association I was a member of and from what I know of their experiances they certainly had reason to, especially the Grand Master. Like I've said though I'd cut the vet some slack on this which it sounds like managment did and the kid didn't force their hand or I suspect just buy and wear a duplicate tie. Certainly violence would have forced managements hand.
     
  8. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

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    Its a tie, no matter the reasoning...In Germany to this day, if a Brit serviceman goes into most cities in uniform with a tie as with myself this week...They too will get a German coming up to them and cutting their tie off...If you didn't like I didn't know that it was Rose Montag week, then like me you would be offended.. Its a tradition, however some Germans at the time of BAOR liked to do it to unsuspecting Brits and did so with a gutso that was not all it seemed. We laughed it off..If I could have understood German swear words more I might have felt more insulted.
     
  9. green slime

    green slime Member

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    Is it not peculiar that the Armistice in WW1, (11:11am 11th of November) coincides with the beginning of the Karneval season?
     
  10. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Good for you!

    There's no point in you and I going back and forth on this any longer.
     
  11. SymphonicPoet

    SymphonicPoet Member

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    To get back to the original post, yes, I have noticed that there is still anti-Japanese sentiment today. Not surprising, really. Specifically anti-Japanese and more generally anti-Asian sentiment has long been fairly prominent in the west. It goes back a long way, rather further than WWII. But I'd say it's more the exception that then rule. I've known many WWII vets, including my own grandfather, and most have been perfectly able to get along with folks from the other side. They still have their scars and quirks, but most have been happy to talk about the other side as human and decent now, no matter what happened then. I'm in the uncomfortable position of being a German speaking Japanese loving military aficionado who wishes to remain in the good graces of the assorted vets he knows. I just leave some details of my own interests out. Most seem okay, but I'm not going to call the few that aren't on their language or prejudices.

    Two asides:

    USMCPrice, didn't realize your uncle was also in the Raiders and the Fourth Marines. Explains a few things. Eegads. Small world.

    Belasar, you just need to see the right Anime. You might actually enjoy Legends of the Galactic Heroes. No giant robots, more muted colors, no magic, no anthropomorphic cats, no gratuitous underwear shots. Lots of politics. Lots of character development. Lots of war. Lots and lots of war. Very ugly war. Wait, why am I recommending this? It's great space opera and a great war movie, if entirely fictitious. (Based on a classic Chinese story.) On the other hand, if you want to be even more horrified, there's a newer one out that features anthropomorphic warships with the standard teenage female persona. (And yes, I believe Yamato features prominently. As a goodguy. No surprises there.) Again on the good side: Zipang is a kind of Final Countdown reconsideration that's surprisingly introspective and features a lot of Japanese people wrestling with the complicated issue of loving Japan and hating what Japan did during the war. They never finished the anime, though maybe the manga went farther. But what's there is tantalizing.

    Anyway . . . back on topic . . . yes, there is anti Japanese sentiment still out there. No doubt there's anti-American sentiment in Japan if you look hard enough. I'm pleased to say that I haven't personally found it. At times I suspect we all make such mistakes. I've probably had an anti-Chinese moment or two in my life. An anti-German moment. (Inspired by one or another German friend) I've surely had some anti-big-lunky-overprivileged-white-American-guy moments . . . which is sort of ironic if you know me. (My wife finds it humorously baffling.) I try to keep them in check. My relatives aren't really any worse than anyone else's. I just have to talk to them more often. But I feel like the world is slowly getting better. Well get through it one day.
     
  12. Smiley 2.0

    Smiley 2.0 Smiles

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    I was watching a series of interviews of veterans whose stories were being used for the HBO series The Pacific, and one of them talked about how it took him years to get over his hatred of the Japanese. He said that only several years ago did he finally lose his hatred.
     
  13. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

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    I know there is a past that has provided untold suffering on both sides of the war. I must choose for myself and try to keep my perspective in recent years and the future of our children and country. A study of diplomatic history(post WWII) would conclude to give the Japanese credit for being a good friend of the United States economically and socially. I have seen the veterans from both sides meet and forgive each other, so I say why not take example from their very healthy step towards a reconciliation, that they have provided in example for the rest of us.
     
  14. dobbie

    dobbie recruit

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    My late father served with the 14th Air Force in WWII and didn't care at all for Japanese people. If you brought something into the house and there was a "Made in Japan" sticker on it, you better scrape it off before the old man saw it or it would be smashed.

    When my older brother moved away from home, he came by to visit riding his new motorcycle, a Kawasaki which he prudently parked on the road at an angle so the old man couldn't see the brand name lol.

    I contrast that with one of my uncles who served in the 82nd Airborne from North Africa to Germany. He was a career soldier and put 34 years in uniform and of course he was stationed in Germany after the war a few times. He didn't hold anything in particular against German soldiers, but he detested anyone who had served in the SS and wasn't quiet about it. I think that because he came to know the German people in peacetime that any hatred he had held against Germany went away.

    In my own time, I was guilty of holding a grudge against people of Southeast Asia because of my experience. That was turned around one day by the owner of a hair dressers shop my wife frequented. I went in to collect my wife and the owner ran up to her and showed us his Naturalization papers he had just received, along with a voter ID card and how proud he clearly was of both. That incident showed me that at least some of them were trying to be part of the community and good citizens, and my bigotry has softened considerably over the years.
     

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