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battle sleds at Anzio

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by bronk7, Oct 18, 2020.

  1. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..has anyone ever read or heard about these battle sleds?...I was watching 'The Big Picture:Beachhead Anzio and saw these ..first time I've ever heard of them
    ..appears they were not too successful
    Chapter 12: Rome and "The Forgotten Front"

    [​IMG]
     
  2. belasar

    belasar Court Jester

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    A worthy goal to get infantry to keep up with the tanks, but I wouldn't want to ride in one of those ready made coffins.
     
  3. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    good analogy ......
     
  4. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Might be a good way to get wounded soldiers off the battlefield to safety.
     
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  5. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Or a half lid, armoured, that the infantry could fire from...or take supplies to a forward position... or could double as a pontoon bridge
     
  6. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ....however, appears they could only be used in ''flat''/even/etc terrain--which greatly limited them--especially in Italy
     
  7. belasar

    belasar Court Jester

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    I'm not sure it would have been popular with the troops, setting aside not having to walk/run into battle. The ride must have been rough, no real armor protection, very little ability to see what is shooting at you and a little awkward to get out of in a hurry.
     
  8. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    This is a similar idea to the Porpoises that were used on D Day by SP artillery to tow ammunition ashore. It sounds like one of the nuttier ideas explored - and rejected in WW1.

    I am not sure what the advantage might be compared to mounting the infantry in armoured half tracks or Bren carriers borrowed from the British..
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I never saw these before. I can see no men in them, so is it a way to convey material (ammo, etc.) to the front? I see no real advantage to use them for men, other than to keep up with tanks. Even so, infantry was afforded no protection from incoming.
     
  10. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    The men are lying on their stomachs, so all you really see of them are the packs on their backs.
     
  11. McCabe

    McCabe Active Member

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    This was a little project of the 3rd Infantry Division - you can see General John O'Daniel observing alongside Mark Clark... I think Truscott's in there, too (now commander of VI corps). I found it quite fascinating when I first came across it in my research of Anzio. They went as far as designating a sled team for each regiment in the division. But, as has been noted, the terrain made the sleds impractical, as the area was covered with all kinds of canals, ditches, and winding gullies, and it didn't really catch on. Personally, I'm in agreement with you all... they look like little portable coffins. No thanks. But I'd have to think they would've really come in handy with evacuating casualties in certain situations, as harolds mentioned above.
     
  12. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ....so, it was a divisional project only?
     
  13. McCabe

    McCabe Active Member

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    Sorry for the delay (lol)... but yes, that is my understanding. It was a project within the 3rd ID. But I could very well be wrong about that, I'm not 100% on it.
     
  14. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    np..sometimes I'm gone from WW2F for some time....thanks for using the reply button....some don't and reply to posts = silly
    ...so, it seems some units ''invented''' their own contraptions.....
     
  15. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    I recall the Red Army using these in going to the battle.not in large numbers but during Winter perhaps 41-43.
     
  16. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..as large as that theater was, I would think so
     
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  17. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    I think they used these By Stalin's order everywhere until they were considered useless.
     
  18. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    One other disadvantage of these sleds is what might happen if the tank had to reverse or some other tank pass behind one?? There really isn't a lot of visibility from inside a tank.Lying down behind one isn't a great place to be. There are many eye witness accounts of wounded men being crushed by manouvering armour.
     

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