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Interesting info on battle of the Atlantic

Discussion in 'Atlantic Naval Conflict' started by Kai-Petri, Mar 28, 2003.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    http://www.seftondelmer.co.uk/10.htm

    Atlantiksender

    Our ablest and most resourceful U-boat man was Eddy Mander, a bright little Hamburg guttersnipe who before the war had been a wireless operator and radio mechanic with the Debeg, the German equivalent of Marconi. Mander held the rank of a Flotillen Oberfunkmeister (Flotilla Chief Radio Petty Officer) which was about as high as an NCO could rise. But he was full of bitterness against his own officers and the Nazi leaders. From being a devout Nazi at the beginning of the war his personal experiences had gradually turned him into a gifted and resolute adversary of the Third Reich.

    Over a British naval transmitter Mander then got his first revenge. With the British to help him he sent out a series of cypher signals which directed two German U-boats to a rendezvous. There they were pounced on by the waiting British. The boats were sunk, their crews joined Mander in captivity. What made Mander invaluable to my team at MB were his technical knowledge, particularly in matters of signals and radar, his wide range of acquaintances among U-boat crews, and his wonderful gift of racy German lower-deck slang. He was an adept at thinking up new grouses. And when it came to suggesting how U-boat men might delay the departure of their ship-and prolong their lives-by petty and unattributable acts of sabotage, not even our own naval experts were more fertile.
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    HMS Trinidad

    PQ-13 in 1942

    She and other escorts were in combat with German destroyers. One of her torpedoes fired had a faulty gyro mechanism possibly affected by the icy waters. The path of the torpedo formed a circular arc, striking the Trinidad. The Trinidad was damaged but partially repaired in Murmansk.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Trinidad
     
  4. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    On 22nd Sept 1943 Tirptz attacked by X-craft

    Panic swept through Tirpitz gunners and they fired indiscriminately killing 120 German personnel, many of them on other ships and at shore installations....

    ( Sacrifice for Stalin book )
     
  5. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    From D Wragg´s "Sacrifice for Stalin"

    A classic example of just how much damage a near miss could do was suffered by the Polish-manned destroyer Garland. A stick of four bombs fell into water, and as they exploded they splattered her hull with splinters and put out of action her "A" and "B" guns and one of her Oerlikon AA weapons, as well as knocking out the forward boiler room, bringing down her radio aerials and igniting smoke floats on her deck. Of her crew, 25 men were dead and 43 wounded.
     
  6. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    From Baron von Müllenheim-Rechberg "Bismarck" on the final battle:

    "Fifteen minutes after the first salvo was fired, the fore top, the forward fire control station, and turrets Anton and Bruno had been disabled, which meant we had lost more than 50% of our fire power..."
     
  7. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The Royal Canadian Navy supplied about half of the ships that fought and won the battle of the Atlantic against the U-boats.

    from R neillands´"Dieppe"
     
  8. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    http://www.airpower.maxwell.af.mil/airchronicles/aureview/1967/jan-feb/aurstaffreport.html

    On the morning of 14 August 1942, Lieutenant Elza K. Shahan, piloting a P-38D with the 27th Fighter Squadron of the First Fighter Group in Iceland, made a diving pass at a German Focke-Wulf Kurier bomber, which was on a reconnaissance mission near Iceland. The shells of the P-38 hit the bomb bay, and the bomber exploded. Lieutenant Joseph D. R. Shaffer of the U.S. 33d Squadron, Iceland Base Command, flying a P-39, had set one of the German bomber’s engines afire before Shalan’s decisive blow. Shaffer and Shahan received Silver Stars and shared credit for the destruction of the aircraft, the first against the Nazis in the European Theater by American pilots in a U.S. unit. Later in the day of the air battle a Lockheed representative in Iceland bought the drinks at the officers club and invited all flyers not on duty to join him in celebrating the P-38’s achievement.
     
  9. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Bismarck´s cat Oscar- 9 lives...

    The story of the Bismarck's cat Oscar is really interesting. This pretty black cat (pictured above) was the mascot of Bismarck, but interestingly Oscar, never brought any 'luck' to the ships which it came aboard. The cat ( edited )itself was lucky as it survived all of the sinkings of the ships it was aboard...

    After the final battle of Bismarck, the British destroyer Cossack found a black, pretty cat among the floating debris of Bismarck. The sailors saved the cat and took on board But it seems this pretty cat didn't bring luck to the destroyer. About 5 months later, The Cossack was sunk by a German submarine, and Oscar was again among the survivors.

    The cat then found its way on board the famous aircraft carrier Ark Royal which played a very important role in the destruction of Bismarck. But, only 3 weeks later, carrier Ark Royal was sunk too, due to torpedoes of another German submarine from Gibraltar. Oscar survived this sinking again. But after this event, the aging cat was never put on another ship again and settled down in a place called 'The Home for Sailors' in Belfast, England.

    http://www.pittelli.com/NABS/TALES.HTM
     
  10. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    This is an insult to any cat. A cat is not a rodent, a cat EATS rodents! :D
     
  11. John Dudek

    John Dudek Member

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    I beg to differ. Some of the rodents in these regions can easily develop a fondness for the taste of Cats. :D
     
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  12. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Although the U-boats sank forty-one merchant vessels in May 1943, it was the last good month of hunting for Dönitz and his Wolf packs in the Atlantic. From that June until the end of war, the Germans never sank more than fourteen merchant ships in any one month.

    From DeBrosse and Burke " Secret in building 26 "
     
  13. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Enemy submarines are to be called U-boats. The term "submarine" is to be reserved for Allied underwater vessels. U-boats are those dastardly villains who sink our ships, while submarines are those gallant and noble craft which sink theirs.

    Winston S. Churchill

    http://www.usmm.org/quotes.html#anchor618155
     
  14. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Hurricat vs Focke Wulf Condor

    Hawker Hurricane

    The Hurricanes used in this roll had to modified & were called Hurricats. They were piloted only by volunteers. The first battle between a Hurricat & a Condor occurred on the 3rd of August 1941. The Hurricat pilot Robert Everett was a former jockey & winner of the 1929 Grand National on a horse called Gregalach. It was to be the first test of this new strategy. High in the clouds above the convoy the patrolling Condor didn't see the rocket fire when Lt. Everett's Hurricat was launched. The crew were taken by surprise but still managed to severely damage the Hurricat. The Condor was equipped with eight machine guns & a heavy cannon. Knowing that he was all that stood between the convoy & it's destruction, Everett fired the last of his ammunition straight into the Condor's cockpit causing it to go down in flames, the first target to be destroyed by a Hurricat. Everett now had to find his way back to the convoy or risk being lost at sea. Lt. Everett's luck held, he managed to climb to 2000 feet (610 m) in the stricken plane & from there he spotted the convoy. He landed the plane safely on the water close to the British ships but the Hurricat flipped over on it's back & quickly began to sink taking Lt. Everett down with it. With difficulty he got the cockpit canopy open & was very lucky to struggle to the surface. For shooting down the Condor, Robert Everett was awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) by King George VI. He was killed the following year while on active service.
     
  15. TA152

    TA152 Ace

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    I have read about the aircraft put on board the ships before and wondered about the wisdom and thinking for this. It would seem cheaper and more efficient to just add lots of AA guns and machine guns to the merchant ships and train the seamen how to shoot in the general direction of the Condor. Wasting an aircraft and pilot and adding the steam catipult to a ship would seem to cost alot more.

     
  16. Za Rodinu

    Za Rodinu Aquila non capit muscas

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    The Hurricats weren't new planes, were they?
     
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  17. TA152

    TA152 Ace

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    You are correct, they were worn out MK I's
    The sinking of the Empress of Britain was the starting point of the idea according to this post. They were only used 11 times for combat.

    Netwings Forums - 'Hurricats' Mini-Campaign
     
  18. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  19. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    " Lacking any sophisticated form of bomb-sight, the Condor crews attacked their targets visually from abeam at low level, diving down to masthead height, where the guns of escort vessels were powerless to interfere. " You could hardly miss" says ( Edgar ) Petersen. " Even without a bomb-sight at least one of the bombs would find the ship provided you kept low enough". Some pilots, learning from experience that what little armament the merchant ships themselves carried was invariably mounted astern, directed their bombing runs along the length of vessels from the bow, pulling up steeply after they had dropped their bombs to avoid collision with masts.


    From Hurricats by Ralph Barker
     
  20. TA152

    TA152 Ace

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    Well since you don't like the AA idea how about lots of barrage balloons flying above the ship ?? :eek:

    Thanks for the new information !
     
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