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Lesser known details of WW2 part four

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by Kai-Petri, Jul 9, 2005.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Adolf Borchers (10 February 1913 – 9 February 1996) was a German former Luftwaffe fighter ace and recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross during World War II. His brother, Major Walter Borchers received the Knight's Cross on 29 October 1944 as Gruppenkommandeur of III./Nachtjagdgeschwader 5 (NJG 5). A second brother, SS-Hauptsturmführer Hermann Borchers received the Knight's Cross on 16 October 1944 as commander of the I. Bataillon of the SS-Panzergrenadier-Regiment 19.

    Adolf Borchers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    From Griffiths "Marshal Petain" (1970)

    On Churchill´s note on 11th June 1940 that the situation in war was like that in March 1918:

    "Yes, the front was re-established. You, the English were routed. But I sent forty divisions to get you out of trouble.Today, it is we who are being broken to bits. Where are your forty divisions?" said Marshal Petain.

    As recalled by De Gaulle.
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  4. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    It seems that 9/11 wasn't the first time a sizable airplane hit one of New York's skyscrapers.

    On July 28 1945 at 9:43 in the morning a B-25 named "Old John Feather Merchant" crewed by Lt. Col William F. Smith, his co-pilot and, one passenger a Navy machinist's mate on emergancy leave, flew into the Empire State Building in heavy fog. The B-25 slammed into the 79th floor killing eight women and one man (he jumped to his death rather than get burned alive) working for the National Catholic Welfare Conference whose offices were so located, along with all aboard the aircraft.
    The scene was reminisent of 9/11 itself although the Empire State Building survived the crash (obviously).
     
  5. ghost_of_war

    ghost_of_war Member

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    I was unaware of the ESB incident.....
     
  6. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    Here is a link to that incedent:

    http://history1900s.about.com/od/1940s/a/empirecrash.htm

    Strangely enough, when the first 767 hit the Trade Center that is exactly what I thought had happened again. This time not "lost in the fog or cloud cover", but victim of the new "computer contolled" flight deck which may have (in my mind) ignored its human pilots and flown itself into the tower. That stayed in my mind until the second one hit the other tower, live on TV.

    It was only about then I even considered it a "terrorist act", up until about 45 minutes after the first one I was just thinking to myself; "boy is this going to set the new Boeing and its computerized flight deck back on the shelf for reliablity!"

    Only a few weeks before this incedent I had seen a special on the new plane (and the 777) as it was going into service extensively, and the program was touting the fact that it could "take-off, fly, and land" without human intervention.
     
  7. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Im not sure if this has already been posted:

    LAST CAVALRY CHARGE OF WW2 (Of course, it would be the Italians)

    n 1942, horse cavalry's days were numbered. After nearly 3000 years of service on the battlefield the cavalryman was rapidly becoming obsolete with the cavalry charge made impractical by the machinegun and the horse being replaced by much faster moving armored vehicles. The beginning of the war saw charges from Polish, British Indian, and American cavalry on distant battlefields around the world in isolated incidents but the best remembered is that of the 250-year old Italian 3rd Dragoons Savoia Cavalleggeri (Cavalry Regiment) of the Prince Amedeo Duke of Aosta “Fast” (Celere) Division while fighting the Soviets on the Eastern Front. On August 23, 1942 the Soviets pushed a gap between the Italian Army its flank with the German 6th Army along the River Don in the Ukraine. Into this gap was rushed the most mobile fresh unit in available, the cavalrymen of the Savoia Regiment Sent to the Eastern Front by Italian strongman Mussolini to uphold his end of Hitler’s Axis invasion of the Soviet Union, the cavalrymen of the Savoia Regiment were a hold over from the dashing age of horse mounted combat. They still carried sabers, and even augmented their Italian blades with captured hilt-less Russian cossack shashka swords. They carried the 1891/38 model Carcano carbines but also augmented them with captured Soviet PPSh41 submachine guns and grenades. Although they wore steel helmets they emblazoned them with black crosses, in commemoration of the Battle of Madonna di Campana in 1706 where the regiment had captured a French battle flag. Each trooper wore a red necktie in honor of a wounded dispatch rider who delivered an important message n the battlefield in the 1790s. Their commander, Colonnello Alessandro Bettoni-Cazzago, was a gentleman from a royal lineage as were many of the units other 600 officers and men. The regiment was organised into four squadrons, one of whom was dismounted to a lack of horses during the hard campaign.
    On August 24, 1942, after a day of masking movements and light skirmishing Colonel Bettoni decided a charge against the Soviet positions stood a chance of stopping them. At dawn of the next day, on a wet Ukrainian morning the regiment assembled. Mounting the charge to flying regimental flags, bugles, drawn sabers and a combined cry of hundreds of men calling “Savoia!, Savoia!” and “Caricat” (charge) the three mounted squadrons of Italians rode forward at a gallop into the Soviet lines. They transitioned through the traditional thousand year old practice of starting at a trot, then a canter then a full gallop. Supported by the dismounted 4th Squadron and the regiment’s machine gun squadron they broke the back of the 2000-strong Siberian 812th Infantry Regiment. In the victorious charge the Italians lost 40 cavalrymen (including the commander of the 4th Squadron, Captain Abba) with another 79 wounded and almost 100 precious horses but they inflicted over 150 casualties on the Soviets and captured some 900 unfortunate Siberians along with a collection of sixty mortars, artillery pieces and machine guns. The regiment, founded in 1692, by Gian Piossasco de Rossi from one of the oldest Italian noble families, won two gold medals and 54 silver medals for that day….and every old horse soldier in Valhalla shed a tear.
    Colonel Bettoni returned to Italy in 1943 and became a leader in the anti-Mussolini resistance, forever loyal to the Duke of Savoy rather than Il Duce. He mysteriously disappeared in 1951. The flag of the Savioa Regiment that was carried into battle that day is now preserved at the Villa Italia in Cascais. The regiment still exists as Reggimento Savoia Cavalleria. It is now equipped with armored vehicles and based at Grosseto in Tuscany, having traded in its horses for good in 1943 when it was briefly disbanded. The troopers still wear red ties and black crosses, but now also have their annual regimental dinner on August 24th, in memory of their last charge.
    Sources

    Tucker, Spencer Encyclopedia of World War II
    Luigi Barzini Jr. Pride Of Italy Sport Illustrated, April 29, 1957
    Andreanelli Sergio The Last Cavalry Charge in WWII” The Shotgun News, March 1990
    Fowler, Jeffery T, Axis Cavalry in World War II
    Dunnigan James F Dirty Little Secrets of World War II
    Farrell, Nicholas "Sabres for savoy". Spectator, The. Oct 31, 1998.
    Philip S. Jowett, Stephen Andrew The Italian Army 1940-45 - 2000
    Stato Maggiore Dell’Esercito – Ufficio Storico (General Staff of the Army – Historical Office). Le Operaazioni Delle Unità Italiane Al Fronte Russo (1941-1943). Rome, 2000
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Blast from the past...

    August 1943:

    In a related development, RFSS Himmler informs 2nd SS CO Walter Krüger that his daughter cannot marry Oberführer Fritz Klingenberg - because SS research into Krüger's wife's family has uncovered a full-blooded Jewess from 1711...
     
  9. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    After being prematurely pronounced dead many times, at midnight on June 30, 1944 the once-controversial WPA (Works Projects Administration) finally did die.

    During its nine embattled years the depression agency spent approximately $10,468,249,000 (enough to pay for 40 days of WW2 in mid-1944), giving both useful and useless jobs to 8,500,000 of America’s unemployed
     
  10. texson66

    texson66 Ace

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    I remember WPA stood for "We Piddle Around"....now we'll have WPA 2
     
  11. brndirt1

    brndirt1 Saddle Tramp

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    Wasn't there a line in To Kill a Mockingbird about Bob Ewell being the only man fired from the WPA for laziness or something like that?
     
  12. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  13. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    FW 190 losses 41-43

    " At the end of September 1943 there were approx. 650 Fw 190´s operational. If we assume there were also a maximum of 100 FW 190´s operational in the Mediterranean area, that gives a total number of approx. 750 FW 190´s. In addition to which there were some 50 aircraft in the training schools. If we assume a total production of 4,500 aircraft, that means that a horrifying total of 80 per cent of the aircraft were lost between 1941-43."

    From FW 190 and Ta152 by Heinz Nowarra
     
  14. topyob

    topyob Member

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    Don't you think it was brave and heroic for Rudolph Hess to fly to an enemy country without permission or clearance in order to try to broker peace between the two nations? I certainly don't believe he deserved to spend his life in Spandau Prison.

    Did you know the most successful double agent of the war was a London Safe Cracker called Eddie Chapman? The abwehr trusted him implicitly. At one point they were paying for the housing and up keep of his girlfriend (a resistance member unbeknown to them) in Norway, while MI5, their British counterparts, were doing likewise for another girlfriend in England!
     
  15. Walt313

    Walt313 Member

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    The sailor has been identified and the reason his left hand is so awkwardly held. His name is Glenn Edward McDuffie. He saw the photographer and held is hand out of the way so that the girl's face could be seen.

    More about this story here.


     
  16. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  17. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    The Cigarette Camps: U. S. Army Camps in the Le Havre Area -- Introduction

    After the Allies secured the French harbor of Le Havre ,the Americans began ringing the city with camps that served as staging areas for new troops arriving in the ETO. Most of the camps were located between Le Havre and Rouen.

    The wartime plan was for incoming units to first pass through staging camps on their way to the assembly areas, and then to the front. The staging-area camps were named after various brands of American cigarettes; the assembly area camps were named after American cities. The names of cigarettes and cities were chosen for two reasons: First, and primarily, for security.

    Secondly, there was a subtle psychological reason, the premise being that troops heading into battle wouldn't mind staying at a place where cigarettes must be plentiful and troops about to depart for combat would be somehow comforted in places with familiar names of cities back home (Camp Atlanta, Camp Baltimore, Camp New York, and Camp Pittsburgh, among others).
     
  18. Dr.Sardonicus

    Dr.Sardonicus Member

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    Hugo Boss made the SS uniforms
     
  19. Dr.Sardonicus

    Dr.Sardonicus Member

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    "Zyklon B was originally developed as a cyanide-based insecticide in the 1920s by Dr. Fritz Haber, a world-renowned chemist and recipient of the 1918 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of a method for the synthesis of ammonia (see Haber Process). Haber fled Germany in 1933 due to his Jewish ancestry (he died of heart failure one year later)." - wiki

    and to really top it all off...

    IG Farben - the company that used slave labour to make Zyklon B is also the same company that brought us Aspirin, (through Bayer).
     
  20. Dr.Sardonicus

    Dr.Sardonicus Member

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    Josef Mengele weaseled out of getting his SS tattoo of his blood type under his arm (which all SS men had to do) by explaining any competent physician would cross check his blood type before a transfusion... Not having the infamous SS tattoo aloud him to leave US custody undetected after the war. He was found in San Paolo posthumously in the mid 80's.
     

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