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Most cost effective weapon

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by harolds, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    roger that harolds, ...I haven't read much on the OstFront.....wish I could've got information from my Uncles, 2 were in 81s Korea, 1 with 4.2s
     
  2. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    IIRC, the largest mortar the Germans put in their halftracks was the 8cm schwere Granatwerfer 34 in the SdKfz 251/2 and the SdKfz 250/7. They also used some captured French tank chassis as well. This French AMR 35 became the 8cm schwere Granatwerfer 34 auf Panzerspähwagen AMR(f)
    https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5067/5564447590_c49934ecd3_o.jpg
     
  3. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    Takao, I guess they would pull into the general direction, and the mortar does have some left to right adjustment, not too much though..seems awkward to aim....how many were put into combat units?
     
  4. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    When I first heard about this it was 1986 and at that time it was explained to me that we had taken the idea from the Israelis. The Israelis and the US Army came up with it right about the time the Army went to the M113 in the late 50's.
     
  5. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    AFAIK, yes, to fire the mortar while mounted, the vehicle had to be facing the target. However, a base plate was usually carried so the mortar could go into action dismounted
     
  6. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    I thought the Israel did not begin acquiring the M-113 until 1972. Until that time, their mortar carriers were based on the open-topped M-3 halftrack. Although they did begin building the Makmat 160mm(a Soltam 160mm mortar on a Sherman chassis) on or about 1966, which did have a better, although limited traverse.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    good idea, but probably a high value target....gun looks tall....says they used it in 1982....84 pound HE, that's big! would they lower the gun to load?
     
  8. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Interesting that the Germans would call their granatwerfer 34, 80mm a "schwere" or heavy mortar because the 120mm was given the term "schwere". However, at some point the Germans made a "Kurz" version of the 80mm where they shortened the barrel about 15" and lightened the baseplate and tripod. This was called the "Stummelwerfer" or stumpy mortar. The idea was for it to be used by airborne troops, but the regular "crunchies" liked the reduced weight and didn't mind the loss of over half the range so more were made. Therefore, the original 80mm might have then been called the "schwere" version and the Stummelwerfer became the "leichte" mortar. Perhaps it somewhat replaced the 50mm Granatwerfer 36 that was phased out after 1940.
     
  9. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Not really. A number of counters exist and the early Exocets weren't particularly reliable either. Indeed it could be argued that small ships were at greater risk as they were less likely to have the defences required to counter them and more vulneralbe to one or two hits.
     
  10. darkh

    darkh New Member

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    Clearly, atomic weapons are most cost effective. They prevented Operation Olympus, which might have resulted in half a million US casualties and ten million dead or maimed Japanese troops and men, women and children civilians. Postwar reconstruction and the enduring hatred of the Japanese people would still be costing us.

    They defeated a huge Japanese land army in China instantly and rendered lesser forces irrelevant. Simultaneously, they deterred Stalin's threat to co-occupy Japan and stabilized the borders in Europe for forty-six years against vastly superior Soviet conventional forces. Initial investment was only about 30 billion 2015 dollars, about 5 percent of the projected lifecycle costs of the F-35.

    And, they've gotten much cheaper. In mass production, the plutonium "triggers" (small atomic bombs used to ignite hydrogen bombs) produced at Rocky Flats in Colorado cost about 500 thousand 2015 dollars each when production was suspended in the 1990's. (This doesn't include the cost of site cleanup, since a plume of radioactive material made it into the groundwater.)

    These weapons would fit in a child's backpack and equal the destructive power of the Hiroshima bomb.

    If we restrict the question to non-WMD's, the latest artillery shells and smart bombs are likely to fit the bill. With guided submunitions a single 155MM round can kill a tank company and a lone JDAM can wipe out far more than an armored battalion.

    Personally, I think an semi-autonomous flying drone the size of a bumblebee, with a Savatoxin sting, produced like cartridges in the tens of millions on automated assembly lines, may well be the future's best cheap antipersonnel weapon, as well as the ultimate terror weapon.
     
  11. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    "Initial investment was only about 30 billion 2015 dollars, about 5 percent of the projected lifecycle costs of the F-35."
    Wow.
    Not sure what that says about the F35.
     
  12. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Recall something about a camera mounted inside a mortar(artillery?) round. As it spun(?) close to the target, it would take several pictures of designated target and transmit back to reciever.
    Tried to find a youtube vid.
     
  13. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Could be you are thinking of NLOS. I think the first proposed system was a missle and that back in the 80's so well after WWII but there may have been an earlier one. Come to think of it some of the early guided missiles used internal cameras as part of the guidance package.
     
  14. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Guided bombs like this.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZiwBditPwk

    AFAIK, it is all lasers and GPS now.

    GPS artillery
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5d_lM5r9Fk
     
  15. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Alternatives to GPS are at least being looked at at this point. I've seen a number of articles in the not too distant past in that regard.
     
  16. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Right now if an enemy could neutralize our GPS system we'd be in a world of hurt!
     
  17. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Not Me...I know how to read a map.
     
  18. harolds

    harolds Member

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    Yes, Takao, I'm sure you can, but can our current weapons systems?
     
  19. green slime

    green slime Member

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    Takao is the backup for our current weapon system.
     
    Otto likes this.
  20. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    I drive a Honda Accord now...Does that make me a Kamikaze?

    OK, when I was younger and had my Honda Prelude...Yes, I'll admit I did drive like a Kamikaze.
     

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