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Need some help on identifying bayonet.

Discussion in 'Small Arms and Edged Weapons' started by entropy17, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. entropy17

    entropy17 recruit

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    I have this bayonet that I'm not really sure what it is or what year it's from. From what I know it's some sort of M1 bayonet from an unknown year and it has the words U.C U.O.S on the base of the blade. Total is about 16 inches long with a 10 inch blade complete with an 11 inch green sheath. It's in bad condition and I'm not even sure if it's a real one or not.Can someone confirm if this is even real, what year it's from and any other information about it? I've included big pictures below to show the detail, I'm sorry about the bad quality of my camera.

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  2. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    Yes, that is an M1 bayonet. These were used on the US M1 Garand rifle, the standard firearm for the US Army/USMC during the war.

    Some history on the bayonet:

    The US Army used the M1905 16" bayonet during WWI. At the start of WWII, they decided that a shorter, 10" bayonet would serve the troops better. Some M1905s were ground down to create a 10" model, and at the same time the factory-made M1 with the 10" blade appeared. Just an interesting side note - many in the PTO preferred the M1905 due the the length of Japanese firearms and bayonets, because while the 10" blade was suited to Europe (matched the length of the standard Wehrmacht bayonet for the K-98 rifle), it was greatly outclassed in length by those of the Japanese.

    As for the markings:

    UoS stands for "US Ordinance Department"
    UC stands for "Utica Cutlery Corp" - this is where it was made (Utica, NY)

    As for the year: Since it isn't stamped into the blade, that means it was likely made post-1943, when the date-stamping practice was halted. Production of these continued until (I think) the mid 50s, so yours could be made anywhere between 1944-and the mid 50s. The photo below shows what the differences through the years in regards to the stamps:

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    That's about all I can tell you (US bayonets aren't my strong point), so maybe one of the other members can chime in and verify the material. And to answer your other question, yes, I would say its original!
     
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  3. sniper1946

    sniper1946 Expert

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  4. cjmdelrosario

    cjmdelrosario recruit

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    I have a 1942 issue of this one. I am a 3rd generation owner. This was passed on to me by my father who received it from his father. Account has it that this was picked up on the ground in the chaos of the war in the Philippines, but I cannot guarantee the accuracy of that story.

    The condition of the bayonet is about the same as in that in the photos above. I want to have it sharpened and restored a bit but still keep its vintage look. I don't think I will ever sell it. I'll pass it on to one of my sons if either one wants it.
     
  5. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    Do not sharpen hit!!!!! use a paint brush and tooth brush to knock off the dust and lightly oil the blade to prevent rust.
     
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  6. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Great advice and I HOPE the poster listens to your advice.
     
  7. cjmdelrosario

    cjmdelrosario recruit

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    Okay, the only reason that I said I wanted to sharpen it was because there are signs that someone tried to sharpen it. I am guessing that whoever did it used a bench grinder, and the sharpening was rather crude. I wanted to fix that. If you say that I shouldn't sharpen it then I wouldn't. It has been with me for years and never did pay attention to it until recently that I developed a liking for knives. Thanks.
     
  8. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    A lot of baynets have been sharpened over the years and it wasn't uncomon for soldiers to sharpen their bayonets; but, they should never be sharpened as a point of restoration. Many of the WW2 Garand Bayonets were actually made from converted 16" model 1910 (?) bayonets that were shortened and re ground at an arsenal, so the grinder marks you see may be a result of that process.
     
  9. Spartanroller

    Spartanroller Ace

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    Hi Brad - same thing with Brit bayonets - lots were shortened by quite crude work as the "fashion" or doctrine changed - i used to have a 1917 pattern sword bayonet that had been taken down from 17" to about 15 1/2" but apparently that was a normal ww2 modification, not a recent vandalisation. IIRC it was due to a Hague convention protocol or similar international treaty - not certain.
     
  10. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    Holy Crap....Nigel's back!!!!.....hide the booze!!
     
  11. Spartanroller

    Spartanroller Ace

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    found it :0 lol
     
  12. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    me too, let Brad do the cleaning when we finish the party.

    M1 bayos are quite popular in Europe , I sometimes see them at fairs, but sellers usually ask a lot of money for them.
     
  13. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    M1 Bayonets are not cheap anywhere unless you can find one someone doesn't know they have. M-8's, for the M16's, are everywhere. I would like to find a reasonably priced cut dowm M1910/ or 35.
     
  14. Up From Marseille

    Up From Marseille Member

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    How's $65 sound, with your choice of manufacturer? I bought two and they are really nice.

    https://estore.odcmp.com/store/catalog/catalog.aspx?pg=catalogList&cat=BAY
     
  15. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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  16. Chindit

    Chindit New Member

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    The one I have (issued 1942) was made by AFH (American Farm and Home) . Where actual history is concerned, these particular weapons were made in order to rearm the Philippine forces following the withdrawal from Corregidor (sic). The pineapple identifies it as belonging to that effort. The US made a LOT of stuff that was intended to be shipped between 1942 and 44, and much of it ended up sitting around in warehouses , just waiting to be picked up by some enterprising GI. Mine was given to my father by an uncle , along with a small hoard of Pacifica. I hope my answer helped.
     

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