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Panzerfaust

Discussion in 'Other Weapons' started by kerrd5, Oct 5, 2009.

  1. Hufflepuff

    Hufflepuff Semi-Frightening Mountain Goat

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    I've heard that the Russians were so impressed with the Panzerfaust that it was the basis for thier post-war RPG program. Is this just popular hearsay or is it actually true?
     
  2. sf_cwo2

    sf_cwo2 Member

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    Look up RPG-2.
     
  3. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    The lineage is the Soviet RPG series grew out of the Panzerfaust 150M and its successor the Panzerfaust 250M that didn't get beyond development stage during the war. Post war the 250M became the RPG 2.

    In West Germany the Panzerfaust was resurrected in the Panzerfaust 3 as well.
     
  4. sf_cwo2

    sf_cwo2 Member

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    Are you guys afraid of research? I don't know what your hang-up is. I never said it was perfect. It was done. Watch the '45 wochenschau vids of GroƟdeutschland units fighting (IIRC in East Prussia). You'll see the technique in use. Wait-- maybe they are firing at really, really, really low-flying aircraft and the missed rounds happened to impact the ground near enemy units! But how do you explain the training video... gross translation errors?

    BTW panzerfausts were rated for further distances. Look at the aiming ladder of the much touted 60m. The 60m window is in the middle. What's the distance for the top window? Anyone?
     
  5. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    Slightly off-topic, but another example of indirect usage of man-portable AT weapons in the period, as fitted to a Loyd Carrier by the RCE and deployed as a battery weapon (I'd love to see some film of them all firing at once) :
    [​IMG]
    There are also after-action reports of commonwealth troops using PIAT as an indirect heavy support against houses etc. I know it ain't a panzerfaust, but it does reinforce the 'any old port in a storm' usage of anything handy that goes bang.

    (BTW, I've got the '60' faust as capable of about 80m at full elevation?)

    ~A
     
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  6. Visukinttu

    Visukinttu Member

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    Ummmm... Panzerfaust was a descendant of PzF 44 Lanze, which had not much to do with Panzerfaust (except the same kind of warhead - as every AT-weapon at that time). Do you mean Panzerschreck?
     
  7. redcoat

    redcoat Ace

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    What you saw was the panzerfaust being used in a direct fire role. They were aiming it at the target, it was just that the drop in the trajectory of the warhead after it was fired was so great they had to hold the weapon at a steep angle in order to hit the target.
     
  8. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    if you guys-some of you are referring to a bunker buster then yes, it was used in house to house on the Ost front besides laying in the open with the Panzerfaust 150 which had a rough range of 100 yds US for the typcial wait for the Soviet panzer and don't miss !

    it was used in varying roles
     
  9. sf_cwo2

    sf_cwo2 Member

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    Umm, what do you mean? The PzF 44 and PzF 3 are both follow-on programs of the WW2 panzerfaust series.
     
  10. Triple C

    Triple C Ace

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    My favorite comment on weapons of this type is quoted as the following.

     
  11. Drucius

    Drucius Member

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    What was the quote from? It pretty much reflects my views of infantry weapons almost exactly.
     
  12. Triple C

    Triple C Ace

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    The Ami official history of the Battle of the Bulge. I think that comment about hand-held infantry AT weapons remain true today.
     
  13. Sack Time

    Sack Time Member

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    If I'm not mistaken, the Faust was the first shaped-charge warhead to be used in military service.
     
  14. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    You are mistaken. The first hollow charge weapon used in action was the German Half-Hohlladung in various sizes. The use of large 50kg charges at the fortress Eben Emal in Belgium was the first actual use. The 3kg charge with magnets was used as an antitank weapon.
    Next up was the US bazooka. The Panzerschrek actually proceeded the Panzerfaust in development too.
     
  15. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Well these probably saw action before the bazooka:
    No. 68 AT Grenade - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    And I believe the bazooka was based on the US equivalant.
    High explosive anti-tank warhead - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    lists several other HEAT rounds that probably saw action before the bazooka.
     
  16. Sack Time

    Sack Time Member

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    Thanks for the info. Actually never heard of the German HH. I need to brush up on my anti-tank weapon history it seems.
     
  17. Chesehead121

    Chesehead121 Member

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    Well, lwd, Wikipedia (as you probably know, not trying to discredit you here) might not be the best source. Although these look like good articles, so it works for me. Also, I heard (from The Fall of Berlin 1945) that captured 'fausts were definately used in house to house fighting. In essence, the theory was: need a wall blown down? Use a panzerfaust. Pros: Shockwave kills a bunch of people, a panzerfaust can easily blow through a brick wall, and a warm backdraft provides a nice respite from the winter cold!
     
  18. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    The British Mk 68 and US M9A1 antitank rifle grenades appear at about the same time. The Bazooka and original Rakentenwerfer 43 Puppchen are next in line with the Bazooka getting into service in mid 42 with the Puppchen following by late 42 early 43. The Panzerfaust goes into trials in March 43 and a pre-production field trials batch of 3000 was released in July 43 to the East front.
    The Germans also produced a range of HEAT antitank rifle grenades for their standard rifle grenade discharger cup and the 27mm Kampfpistolle from mid 42 on as well. These were copied by the Japanese and issued in limited numbers starting in 1944 also.
     
  19. TiredOldSoldier

    TiredOldSoldier Ace

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    What about that strange contraption fired from the Pak 36 ?
    Think it was called Stielgranade 41 and was in use by 1942.

    HEAT rounds Gr 38 HL for the 75mm weapons were also in use in 1942 and possibly earlier.
     
  20. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    Indeed. Especially with more obscure info. However this was consistent with what I remember reading about the development of the Bazooka. Still pays to check.
    I remember reading somewhere that the commander of one US division gave orders that any captured panzerfaust were to be collected for redistribution and use by his troops. One of the airborne division I think but could be off on this.
     

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