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rounds or bullets term

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by bronk7, May 1, 2021.

  1. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ...what ''official'' term did the British military use for ammo- -rounds or bullets? ...I bring this up because I was watching the 1967 film Tobruk and a Brit refers to ammo as bullets
     
  2. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    British Forces always used the term 'rounds'. 1967's ''Tobruk' ( I'm guessing this is the one starring Rock Hudson and George Peppard ? ) was very much a 'Hollywood' movie.. British actors portrayed British soldiers but probably had to appeal to a more 'International' audience who may not have been familiar with correct parlance ( or even German forces using M3 halftracks...;) )
     
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  3. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..thanks...I thought the Brits had different terms for stuff--like petrol instead of gas? etc
     
  4. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..the tv show MASH was good at using military terminology, etc
     
  5. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Thinking back on this, I could have been a bit clearer. 'Bullet' is the part that flies through the air and hits the target. 'Round' usually refers to the entire cartridge ie integrated bullet and propellant casing. I actually don't know when the term 'round' came into use ie what happened in the days of the musket......
     
  6. Owen

    Owen O

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    Me after a day on the ranges.
    ''I have no live rounds or empty cases in my possession, Sir! ''
    An American who was with us,
    ''I ain't got no ammo nor no brass , sur.''
    ( yes I know there are double negatives there.)
     
  7. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    good call
     
  8. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ....I would think we had instruction on the terminology that Martin wisely brings up = the parts of the ammo.....but, I went to boot camp and ITS over 30 years ago, so I can't remember.....
     
  9. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    I have to check the musketry manual.
     
  10. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Going back to the original question, this is hopefully definitive to show the 'official' British Army term. I've copied from my original WWII Infantry Training Manual for the Light Machine Gun ( AKA the Bren Gun ) : -

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    round may also indicate an explosive? like an artillery round vs an artillery bullet.
    most people here say "'round" rather than " bullet".
    my guess is that round contains the brass, powder, primer, and bullet.
     
  12. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    "The casing, usually the cylindrical body of the round houses the gunpowder. So what you understand as a complete “bullet” is actually a round. “Round” comes from when soldiers had to reload after each “round” of firing. ... Bullets are often called rounds because the first bullets were literally little round metal balls."
     
  13. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    I've always been puzzled by "round". The only thing I can think of is that cannonballs were called "round shot", but how does that make it a generic?
     
  14. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Perhaps a reiteration...
    "The casing, usually the cylindrical body of the round houses the gunpowder. So what you understand as a complete “bullet” is actually a round. Round” comes from when soldiers had to reload after each “round” of firing. ... Bullets are often called rounds because the first bullets were literally little round metal balls."

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    yes, we called mortar ammo ''rounds''
     

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