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The B24

Discussion in 'Modelling' started by Prospero Quevedo, Jul 14, 2021.

  1. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    im more of a fan of the b17 but we built so many of the 24 more than any other during the war. I like the naval versions the pb4y1 should be an easy conversion the liberator 1&2 and the pb4y2 will be a real project. I've really liked the pricateer, my biggest problem is how to rebuild the engine nacelle like there 90 turned on the privateer thinking cut them off rebuild them reinstall turned over. Started reworking the wings the three kits I have are old still raised line the new one is etched but it's a cafereo and ftoys kits that are pre painted and mostly assembled, no kit is out but maybe one day they will do a true kit release. Got four or five cafereo b17s the old rev and mini craft ones never looked right to me this one looks great also scales right the others are under sized. Also I like there are so many variants of the 24 working on the c97. Making progress on my land caster to Manchester conversion and took one of my he111, and reworking the wings back to early war with the stepped nose and elliptical wings looking good so far.
     
  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    At its inception, the B-24 was a modern design featuring a highly efficient shoulder-mounted, high aspect ratio Davis wing. The wing gave the Liberator a high cruise speed, long range and the ability to carry a heavy bomb load. Early RAF Liberators were the first aircraft to cross the Atlantic Ocean as a matter of routine. In comparison with its contemporaries, the B-24 was relatively difficult to fly and had poor low-speed performance; it also had a lower ceiling and was less robust than the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress. While aircrews tended to prefer the B-17, General Staff favored the B-24 and procured it in huge numbers for a wide variety of roles.[3][4] At approximately 18,500 units – including 8,685 manufactured by Ford Motor Company – it holds records as the world's most produced bomber, heavy bomber, multi-engine aircraft, and American military aircraft in history.

    Lindell Hendrix, later a test pilot for Republic Aviation, flew B-24s for the Eighth Air force.[20] Hendrix preferred the B-24 to the B-17. In Eighth Air force combat configuration, the aircraft carried 8000 lb (3600 kg) of bombs. It could manage an altitude of no more than 25,000 ft (7600m), three or four thousand feet less than a B-17, but it flew 10-15 mph (16-24kph) faster. Its lower altitude made it more vulnerable to flak. Hendrix figured that Germans understood it was easier to hit, and that it carried more bombs.

    It was necessary when flying the B-24, to get "on step". This meant climbing to about 500 ft (150m) above cruise altitude, levelling off, achieving a cruise speed of 165-170 mph (265-275kph), then descending to assigned altitude. Failing to do this meant that the B-24 flew slightly nose high, and it used more fuel. The Davis wing made the B-24 sensitive to weight distribution. Hendrix claimed that a lightly loaded B-24 could out-turn a P-38 Lightning. A heavily loaded B-24 was difficult to fly at speeds of less than 160 mph (260kph). The B-24's controls were heavy, especially if the control rigging was not properly tensioned.

    B-24s leaked fuel. Crews flew with the bomb day doors slightly open to dissipate potentially explosive fumes. Hendrix did not permit smoking on his B-24, even though he was a smoker. Chain smoker "Tex" Thornton, then in command of the US Army Air Corps' Statistical Control, flew across the Atlantic in a B-24, and was not permitted to smoke.[21] Thornton's Statistical Control group demonstrated that Eighth Air force B-24s were taking lower casualties than B-17s because they were being given shorter, safer missions. The B-17s actually delivered more bombs to the target than B-24s.

    Consolidated B-24 Liberator - Wikipedia
     
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  3. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    How about an Australian B-24?
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    That would be the simplest solution...However, you are going to need some modelling putty to reduce the size of the top scoop.

    You see, the cowling was redesigned, because there was no turbosupercharger - the Privateer was meant to operate at lower altitudes.
    See here.
    Privateer cowling.png
     
  5. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Also, Cobra Company used to make a 144 PB4Y-2model some years ago. They sold there molds to UK-based Blackbird Models, which should be releasing the PB4Y-2 sometime in the near future.
    See there Facebook feed, scroll down to February 9th.
    Log into Facebook
     
  6. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    Yeah saw I have a lot of problems to resolve, but it would be a great project to do if I can. Thinking I should get a jewelers saw that might help with separating the nacelles a modelers scroll saw might be great but not in my price range right now.
     
  7. Prospero Quevedo

    Prospero Quevedo Active Member

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    Yeah saw I have a lot of problems to resolve, but it would be a great project to do if I can. Thinking I should get a jewelers saw that might help separate the nacelles would love a modelers scroll saw but someday lol,must can't afford one now.
     

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