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Trench slang

Discussion in 'Military History' started by Kai-Petri, Oct 22, 2004.

  1. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-slang/ww1.htm

    ALLEYMAN German soldier. From French Allemande.

    ANZAC SOUP a shell hole full of water polluted by a corpse.

    ANZAC STEW any improvised meal the troops managed to prepare from their monotonous rations.

    BASE RAT A soldier perpetually at the base, therefore maintaining comfort and safety. Also known as a base wallah.

    BILLJIM Any Australian. A composite word formed from two popular Australian forenames of the time.

    BULL RING British army training establishment such as those base camps at Rouen, Harfleur, Havre and Etaples. Men were posted here from the front line for refresher training, and to "inculcate the offensive spirit". The Bull Ring at Etaples was infamous for its severe discipline.

    DEEP THINKERS men belonging to reinforcements in the last stages of the campaign, often members of the 3rd Div.

    DINKUM Genuine, right Something proper was said to be fair dinkum. Among the Australian troops, those who had served at Gallipoli were known as The Dinkums.

    DUCKBOARD HARRIER Runner, messenger. From the term for a cross-country runner, originally derived from hare.

    EN-ZEDDERS New Zealanders

    GALLIPOLI GALLOP, THE diarrhea

    GO WEST (1) To be killed, to die. The most popular euphemism of this type. (2) To go astray or be stolen.

    GOGGLE-EYED BUGGGER WITH THE TIT British gas helmet. The wearer had to breathe in through the nose from inside the helmet and breathe out through a valve held in the teeth.


    MAD MINUTE Firing off fifteen (or more) rounds of rapid fire aimed shots from a bolt action .303 Lee Enfield rifle in one minute. Many regular soldiers of the BEF were expert shots due to the incentive of extra pay for marksmen.

    RATS AFTER MOLDY CHEESE RAMC. Correctly, Royal Army Medical Corps.

    ROB ALL MY COMRADES RAMC. Correctly, Royal Army Medical Corps. From the belief that medical personnel went through the pockets of casualties.

    S.R.D. Rum, seldom reaches destination from Supply Reserve Depot, the inscription found on rum-jars


    SIX BOB A DAY TOURISTS nickname for members of the 1st Division.

    THIRD MAN To go too far. The most popular superstition on the Western Front was that the third man to light his cigarette from the same match would inevitably be killed soon after. This was derived from the story that enemy snipers would, at night, use the flame of the match to find a target - the first light alerted the sniper, the second allowed him to aim, and the third time he fired.

    WOOLLY BEAR German shrapnel shell, bursting with a cloud-like explosion.
     
  2. figjam

    figjam Member

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    i got these from www.firstworldwar.com

    dixie - army cooking pot
    coffin nails - british slang for cigarettes
    suicide ditch - british slang for a trench on the front line
    black hand gang - raiding party or a selected group engaged in some desperate enterprise
    toc emmas - slang for trench mortars
     
  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Ww1 trench slang...
     

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