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USS Zumwalt (DDG-1000)

Discussion in 'Non-World War 2 History' started by Class of '42, Apr 28, 2020.

  1. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    SAN DIEGO (NNS) -- The Navy accepted delivery of USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000), the lead ship of the Navy's next-generation of multi-mission surface combatants, on April 24, 2020.


    Following this delivery, the ship will transition from Combat Systems Activation to the next phase of developmental and integrated at-sea testing. This event marks a major milestone of the dual delivery approach for USS Zumwalt, which achieved Hull Mechanical & Electrical delivery from shipbuilder General Dynamics' Bath Iron Works in May 2016. Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems was the prime contractor for the Zumwalt Combat System, and has lead activation and integration for Zumwalt class ships both in Bath, Maine and San Diego.


    "Delivery is an important milestone for the Navy, as DDG 1000 continues more advanced at-sea testing of the Zumwalt combat system," said Capt. Kevin Smith, DDG 1000 program manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. "The combat test team, consisting of the DDG 1000 sailors, Raytheon engineers, and Navy field activity teams, have worked diligently to get USS Zumwalt ready for more complex, multi-mission at-sea testing. I am excited to begin demonstrating the performance of this incredible ship."


    With delivery, USS Zumwalt joins the U.S. Pacific Fleet battle force and remains assigned to Surface Development Squadron One. In addition to at-sea testing of the Zumwalt combat system, DDG 1000 will also operate as a key enabler in the acceleration of new warfighting capabilities and rapid development and validation of operational tactics, techniques, and procedures.

    At a cost of $7.5 billion each and five years behind construction, it had it's critics as to the future in naval stealth capability and cost overruns. Two more of these Zumwalt class guided missile destroyers have been built but the other 29 ordered were cancelled due to the extreme high cost to U.S. taxpayers.

    USS Zumwalt.jpg
     
  2. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

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    Ugly little booger
     
  3. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    Reminds me of some old Confederate ironclad steaming up the Potomac River looking for a fight.
     
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  4. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    Too bad stealth doesn't work in the visible light spectrum ;)
     
  5. belasar

    belasar Court Jester

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    Hopefully we can salvage some of the technology to employ on more conventional and cost effective ship designs.
     
  6. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    After reading this article..it sounds like a big waste of taxpayers money and is limited in it's ability to perform the original mission parameters...a million dollars a round???..read on...rather bring out some Fletcher Class destroyers from mothballs than this overpriced tin can.

    The U.S. Navy's Titanium “Tin Can”
     
  7. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Fletchers are not in mothballs, they are museums.
     
  8. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    I know...I was just being what they say in German ....ein Schlauer..a smartass.
     
  9. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Well, it would have been close to the truth 30 or so years ago. When I visited the Cassin Young, she was in fairly good condition, as were her engines. The tour guide said she could be put back into action in a short time, he also added that in the age of missiles, the Young would be little more than a target.

    AFAIK, the Cassin Young completed a yard period in 2013, but much work needed to be done to make her seaworthy.
     
  10. Class of '42

    Class of '42 Active Member

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    Pentagon should of cancelled that contract and instead invested it into keeping the B-52 flying for another 40 years...anytime..anywhere.
     
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