Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

Tags:
  1. Riter

    Riter Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    159
    Barbarossa Through Soviet Eyes.
     
  2. ULITHI

    ULITHI Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,889
    Likes Received:
    399
    Location:
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    1EB0FDE1-C30E-4D91-BA3E-D68AF8F017EF.jpeg
    I have about 50 pages left of “ The cruise of the German Raider Atlantis” by Joseph Slavick. I have really enjoyed this book so far, and never thought about the complex tactics and questions faced by surface raiders. What to shoot first? A warning shot? Or aim for the radio room?
     
    Riter, Slipdigit and Kai-Petri like this.
  3. Flingwing67

    Flingwing67 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2021
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    13
    Just finished Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors. Incredible detail in this book. Parts of it broke my heart, the missed opportunities to rescue survivors.
     
    OpanaPointer, Slipdigit and LRusso216 like this.
  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,717
    Likes Received:
    2,238
    Location:
    Alabama
    Agree, a great book.

    Follow up that one with The Men of the Gambier Bay, by Edwin P. Hoyt. It is outstanding.

    It and the Last Stand... are 10/10 with me.
     
  5. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,717
    Likes Received:
    2,238
    Location:
    Alabama
    Has anyone read The Battle of Leyte Gulf: The Death Knell of the Japanese Fleet by Edwin P Hoyt (1972)?

    I found it in the bibliography of The Last Epic Naval Battle and thought it might be worth purchasing, given some of the reviews I found.
     
  6. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,717
    Likes Received:
    2,238
    Location:
    Alabama
    I finished this book yesterday.
    [​IMG]

    The Last Epic Naval Battle: Voices from Leyte Gulf, David Sears, 2007, New American Library, 248 pages, photos, one map, end notes, index.

    I hate to say, especially after suggesting this book to Lou, that I am underwhelmed. Its not that is was a poor book, it just wasn't as interesting as I was hoping it would be.
    I anticipated a stronger narrative from the men who participated in the fighting. There were lot of quotes from and references to, and about, the the sailors and airmen, but it seemed to me to be a retelling of the battle, leaving out the Battle of Cape Engano. If I didn't already have a good grasp of the battle, I could have come way from reading it without fully understanding what was going on.

    The author had quotes from a large number of the men, and that could have been part of the problem, as sometimes I felt some of the words of the men were left out that could have added a bit more the narrative.

    Overall, it is an acceptable addition to my bookshelf

    7/10
     
    Half Track likes this.
  7. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,717
    Likes Received:
    2,238
    Location:
    Alabama
    I just finished:
    [​IMG]

    Bailout Over Normandy, Ted Fahrenwald, 2012, Casemate, 286 pages, photos. ISBN 978-1-61200-474-7

    This one of the best books I have read lately.

    Lt Theodore "Ted" Fahrenwald was a Mustang pilot who bailed out of his crippled fighter-bomber after taking heavy damage from an exploding ground target east of Caen a few days after Overlord. He was ably assisted by French locals, including members of the Maquis until he tried to make his way to British lines on the Orne. He was detained by German forces and eventually discovered by them not be a local Frenchman and was sent further inland, to wait on transport to a proper PoW camp. He managed to escape and was hidden by a French farmer and his wife until the area was liberated in mid-August by French and US forces.

    Fahrenwald wrote a manuscript of his adventures in 1946, but left it on the shelf. After his death, his daughter worked to have the manuscript published without editing, other that to correct some spelling and punctuation.

    Fahrenwald apparently was quite a character and this work well represents his exuberant, comical outlook on life. While the book is not dismissive of the perils he and others faced during the two months he was lost, evaded, was captured, escaped, evaded again, and then was recovered, his telling of his adventures is comical at times and easily held my interest. His description of his bailout was hilarious to me, but still described the dangers and closeness of death for him

    I highly recommend this book for its sheer entertainment value alone. The historical record is a close second and well worth the read for that. His writing style is just additional cream.

    10/10 Why have I not read this before? Furthermore, why aren't getting yourself a copy and reading now?
     
    Kai-Petri and ColHessler like this.
  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    14,005
    Likes Received:
    2,423
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I just ordered this book and it should be here in a couple of days. After I read it I'll let you know my thoughts.
     
  9. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,180
    Likes Received:
    582
    Location:
    Chambersburg Pennsylvania
  10. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    25,522
    Likes Received:
    1,965
    Location:
    Finland
    Genocide and Rescue in Wolyn By Tadeusz Pietrowski. MacFarland & Company 2000.

    About Ukrainian nationalistic ethning cleansing agains the Poles.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2021
  11. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,717
    Likes Received:
    2,238
    Location:
    Alabama
    I finished this last night.

    [​IMG]

    Building the Bridges to Victory, Tom Muller, 2007,2011, Holtz Creative Enterprises, 138 pages, photographs, Bibliography.

    Judging the photo of the cover I found on Amazon and comments made on the back of my copy, I think this book was originally just a pamphlet of sorts intended for a small audience, maybe just the men and families of the 286th Combat Engineer Battalion.

    I was hoping it would be as engrossing as The GI Journal of Sergeant Giles (also an engineer) I had read earlier, but alas, it wasn't.

    I think this was just a labor of love for the author late in his life, so I won't tear it apart. It lacked a great deal of polish and was somewhat hard to read, but does reflect well upon the actions a small unit that probably would have gone unnoticed otherwise.

    5/10
     
  12. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    25,522
    Likes Received:
    1,965
    Location:
    Finland
  13. Flingwing67

    Flingwing67 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2021
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    13
    Just finished it! Outstanding book. Thanks!
     
    Slipdigit likes this.
  14. Stefan F Schnabl

    Stefan F Schnabl New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2021
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    A while back, we discovered handwritten journals in our hometown while working on the church archives. They were from an Austrian WW2 soldier, who served on the front line in Russia. My stepdad transcribed the work, and we had it translated. It is available since 2 days here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09NJNZB6F. The title is 'Conquering Moscow', and the book is simply incredible. The detailed account, including events, locations, but also technical details of military tactics, processes, and weaponry are incredible. My stepdad verified the whole thing for accuracy and we have also added some images. I'd be curious what folks here think about such work.

    Here is one line which just always makes me lose my breath: "The soldier was ordered to carry on with a war without end, or until you were killed. The only thing one felt anymore was a total emptiness because you saw the person next to you wounded or killed several times a day. Sometimes you could still call for the medic, often not. I reached the moment of absolute mental depression when I envied the fate of those who died next to me."

    The author is Xaver Meier (name altered), and was a farm boy from my home town. Knowing that he was a kid, just like me, who grew up here, and that had I been born 70-odd years earlier ot would have likely be my fate as well just doesn't compute with me most of the time.
     
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    15,264
    Likes Received:
    4,713
    Halfway through The Prince, Jerry Pournelle and S. M. Sterling. This is a collection of stories, some previously unpublished that follows the formation of the Empire of Man. Lysander I (before he was crowned) and John Christian Falkenberg. This is background for The Mote in God's Eye (Heinlein called this "the best first contact book I've ever read.) 800+ pages, so a book holder is needed. (Or maybe I'm just getting lazy.)
     
  16. Riter

    Riter Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    159
    Carole Avriett's Marine Raiders. I enjoyed her other work, Corner Coffin Boys.
     
    Slipdigit likes this.
  17. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    25,522
    Likes Received:
    1,965
    Location:
    Finland
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Heimdal 2006, 111 pages, lots of photos and maps.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2021
    Half Track likes this.
  18. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    Messages:
    17,717
    Likes Received:
    2,238
    Location:
    Alabama
    I started this today
    [​IMG]

    Outpost of Occupation, How the Channel Islands Survived Nazi Rule 1940-45, Barry Turner, Aurum Press 2010.
     
    Half Track and Kai-Petri like this.
  19. ULITHI

    ULITHI Ace

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    1,889
    Likes Received:
    399
    Location:
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    41769018-FFEB-4E93-BC61-C90BF5333399.jpeg
    I just got done reading “Death in the South Atlantic” by Michael Powell. It kept my attention pretty good, and I guess it was the book which the movie “The Battle of the River Plate” was based off of. I found it interesting, but not sure how accurate it is. It was my first book I have ever read exclusively about the battle. I also watched “Battle of the River Plate” on YouTube yesterday. Kind of hard to accept an American Cruiser playing the Graf Spee, but it was enjoyable to see once.
     
    ColHessler and Half Track like this.
  20. Flingwing67

    Flingwing67 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2021
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    13
    Just finished it. Great book! Thank you!
     

Share This Page