Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

What happened to all of Germany's weapons and armaments after WWII?

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by VincentWesley, Mar 6, 2020.

  1. VincentWesley

    VincentWesley New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2020
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    What happened to all of Germany's weapons and armaments after WWII? Did the allies just dismantle and melt everything down or did they take and use the former German weapons?

    When I look at pictures of military arms of west and east Germany they all look like Russian or American equipment.

    What happened to the millions of guns and thousands of German tanks from the Third Reich?

    I heard many minor allied countries after the war had shortages of arms needed weapons but even with countries like Yugoslavia they seems to be driving American tanks and British planes after the war rather than confiscated German equipment which I would've thought was superior and now readily available due to the war ending.

    What happened to all the German arms?shareit appvn
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2020
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    14,456
    Likes Received:
    4,101
    The Soviets grabbed everything that wasn't nailed down. They demanded "reparations" from the other Allied Zones as well as their own. Weapons were loaded up to be sent back to Rodina to be melted down as scrap in many cases.
     
  3. Takao

    Takao Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    9,483
    Likes Received:
    2,243
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    Infantry weapons were reused by many nations after the war. Sometimes being modified to chamber ammunition that was in more supply.

    Some aircraft were reused, but most were melted down for scrap. Much the same for tanks & artillery. A lack of spare parts would doom most in the years following the end of the war.

    Sherman's and T-34s were plentiful & were in running condition, with many ready sources of spare parts, this was not so for most German AFVs, although a few models remained in post-war production in other nations.
     
  4. harolds

    harolds Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,791
    Likes Received:
    322
    When I was taking basic officer training at "The Ft. Benning School for Wayward Boys" we had a three-day course on what the engineers actually did and also how to use explosives. One of the main points was that if you know what you're doing, it usually doesn't take a lot of explosives to get the job done. As an illustration, the instructor told a story of a 2nd lieutenant on occupation duty in the Rhineland of Germany shortly after the war. There came an order down the chain of command that all the guns, cannons, mortars, ammunition, individual weapons, etc laying around needed to be disposed of. Each succeeding layer of command passed the order down to the next level unit it arrived on the desk of our hero, who couldn't pass it down since there wasn't an officer in the engineering section lower than he was! Therefore, our intrepid butter-bar grabbed a section of enlisted men, some dozers and other earth-moving equipment, as well as a large consignment of explosives and headed out to perform his mission.
    After selecting a large field, the men gathered up all the offending ordinance and brought them to the field. In the meantime, the dozers had scraped out a huge pit in the middle of the field. They lined the bottom of the pit with c-4 Then over that they put a layer of arty pieces, mortars, crew-served weapons and such. After that came a layer of artillery shells and other forms of ammunition, after which another layer of weapons was laid, followed up by more explosives.
    In the meantime, other engineers had made a sturdy bunker at the edge of the big field to which they all repaired. When they touched the whole thing off it made for a pretty impressive bang, but they were sure that they had done their duty and the weapons were destroyed.
    On returning to base the young officer was instructed to report to the commanding general. After properly reporting to the high and mighty one, the general casually asked if he was the one who was in charge of destroying the ordinance. After the lieutenant replied in the affirmative, the general fixed him with a steely gaze and said he had one more mission for him. He was to go the Bishop of Cologne's residence and explain to him how that mortar barrel suddenly appeared in his front yard!
     
  5. Owen

    Owen O

    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Messages:
    2,570
    Likes Received:
    624
    Syrians used Panzer IV.

    The French used alot of old panzers including Panthers.

    See @von Poop 's old post on ww2t.
    French Panthers & Spanish '88's
     
  6. harolds

    harolds Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,791
    Likes Received:
    322
    A lot of the K98's ended up in this country where the actions were used as the basis for all sorts of sporting rifles. Some that were in relatively good shape were kept unaltered and went into collections or used for re-enactors. I can remember the time that you could go into sporting goods/hardware stores and there would be a barrel of old military rifles that one could buy for $35-$50 along with a whole bunch of surplus ammo.

    Interarms imported a lot of the them and also worked with the CIA to arm "our" side of various conflicts.
     
  7. R Leonard

    R Leonard Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    972
    Likes Received:
    629
    Location:
    The Old Dominion
    yeah, I remember those days, like 1969 or so, Clarke's Gun Shop & Range at Clarke's Mountain VA. Springfield 03s at $50 a pop, just pick one you want out of the barrel. Of course, for a high school student, making but $1.35 an hour, maybe 15 hours a week, $50 was a lot of bucks back then, what with $20 a weekend to operate a 66 GTO, the cost of doing business, don't you know. I've regretted never being able to muster the funds ever since.
     

Share This Page