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Atomic bomb production schedule...

Discussion in 'Wonder Weapons' started by OpanaPointer, Oct 24, 2021.

  1. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I frequently see "they were lucky the Japanese decided to surrender after Nagasaki, they wouldn't have had any more bombs for a long time after those two.

    This is from the "NSA Bomb Docs" site.

    "4. The final components of the first gun type bomb have arrived at Tinian, those of the first implosion type should leave San Francisco by airplane early on 30 July. I see no reason to change our previous readiness predictions on the first three bombs. In September, we should have three or four bombs. One of these will be made from 235 material and will have a smaller effectiveness, about two-thirds that of the test, but by November, we should be able to bring this up to full power. There should be either four or three bombs in October, one of the lesser size. In November there should be at least five bombs and the rate will rise to seven in December and increase decidedly in early 1946. By some time in November, we should have the effectiveness of the 235 implosion bomb equal to that of the tested plutonium implosion type."​

    Rough math says dozens of atomic bombs would have been available for Operation Coronet (March 1946), less those used in Olympic (November 1945).

    https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB162/45.pdf, page 2.
     
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  2. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I knew more bombs were going to be available, but this document blows me away. Since production would continue, Coronet and Olympic in 1946 would be more dangerous to the Japanese than I thought. I wonder if Giangreco was cognizant of this infornation?
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I'll take a look.

    BTW, the short answer to the above claim is "there were already two more atomic bombs in the Pacific when the war ended." They were used for the tests at Bikini.
     
  4. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Yes, Giangreco was aware. He was also aware that Marshall was ready to save the impending atomic bombs for a tactical campaign rather than continuing with the strategic atomic bombing of cities. Some Japanese were also expecting a continuing rain of atomic bombs.
     
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  5. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Well...Maybe.

    The third core was in the hands of Los Alamos quality control of August 30, 1945. It may have been returned, or have never left for the Pacific. Still, the surrender of Japan on August 14th would have delayed it's shipment. The fourth core was not completed on or about September 5th.

    The third core, aka the "Demon Core" was to have been expended in Test "Charlie". But, this test was cancelled. and the core was melted down and re-manufactured to make other cores.
     
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  6. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Interesting. I have the book, but the details are fuzzy. Can you point out the relevant material?
     
  7. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    .......I was listening to podcasts about the bombs and then looked up some history on the net...I read about the same thing ...yes, I thought I read some time ago about the myth of no bombs available...so it surprised me to read there would've been some available
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The people were used to thinking in "thousands of bombs", so dozens or hundreds of the new bomb wasn't at all hard to swallow. The Manhattan Project was, from Day One, committed to producing enough bombs to destroy the infrastructure of the Axis countries, and then making the rubble jump after that was accomplished. We could have glassed North Korea by 1950.
     

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