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Bachelor Recipes

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Poppy, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    I'm sticking with the meat + fire formula:

    [​IMG]


    (The split chicken was dusted with salt and hawaij before being tossed on the grill (indirect heat). Lemons and green onions optional, but that lemon was really good. Just sayin'....)
     
  2. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    looks good man. can i get delivery
     
  3. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    I can cater.........
     
  4. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Here’s a gluten-free, easy recipe for ya, Poppy! Let's call it "Poor Man's Pulao".

    [​IMG]


    Prep:

    • Shred or chop some leftover cooked chicken (from the fire + meat recipe above, ;)).
    • Use your bayonet to chop up an onion.
    • Mash up some garlic and ginger with your rifle butt.
    That’s the prep work done.

    Now, put your helmet (or a decent pot) over the fire. Once it gets hot, toss in some oil (cooking, not motor) or butter and get it nice and hot.

    Toss in the mashed ginger and garlic. Once they sizzle and smell nice (a few seconds), toss in the chopped onion. Let that all sizzle up until the onions are soft and smelling fragrant.

    Now toss in the shredded chicken and a few spices. Whatever you like. (Here I used turmeric, cumin, and a little ground clove.)

    Add a decent amount of uncooked rice. Then add water or chicken stock (about 1.5x as much water as rice by volume, enough to cover.). Stir that all in.

    Cover your helmet (or pot) and let simmer for 30 minutes or until the rice is fully cooked, fluffy and soft, and the liquids are all absorbed. (In actuality, the rice in this batch came out a little bit 'al dente'...but, hey, "consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" according to Emerson. :D )

    Share with your foxhole buddy or refrigerate any leftovers. Tabasco is recommended....as always.
     
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  5. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I eat something similar.
    Swirled rye (two slices)
    2 slices liverwurst (same as braunschweiger)
    Brown mustard
    Make a sandwich
    w/ dill pickles on the side

    No onions. Love 'em but they don't love me.
     
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  6. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    ginger is veg porn and i wont work with it.
    ginger is a beautiful movie star stranded on an island.
     
  7. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    LOL!

    You take Ginger, I'll go with Mary Ann.....

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    OK, Poppy, here's one so easy even Opana could manage it.....

    [​IMG]

    Hummus with gluten-free crackers. These crackers are fantastic!

    Directions:
    1. Put hummus and crackers in bowl.
    2. Eat.

    You want to know why the Israelis won the Six-Day War? Hummus!
     
  9. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    holy cow. ..
    i laughed.
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Two items? Two much work.
     
  11. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Another two-item meal, but it is my father's favorite: the meatloaf sandwich.

    [​IMG]


    1. Leftover meatloaf goes on the sourdough bread.
    2. Dress with ketchup.
    3. Top with more sourdough bread.
    4. Eat with gusto.

    (oh, boy, I just realized this is a three (3) ingredient meal....there's just no way Opana tries this one....)
     
  12. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Gimme a bottle of 50% Ringer's/50% everclear and I'm good.
     
  13. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    IV or coconut with umbrella and colored straw?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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  15. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Wait.......is OP actually Thurston Howell......the Third?

    :rofl:
     
  16. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    OP wears many hats.
    ive been thinking about the sour dough. id like to try and build my own. would appreciate your best gf recipe.
    time and effort are my greatest enemy.
     
  17. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Ach, my sourdough isn't gluten-free, sorry. However, some people who find modern 'bread' to be difficult to digest, find that genuine sourdough bread agrees with them. Real sourdough is developed with a wider range of yeasts and bacteria. The bacteria help to digest the byproducts of the yeast and acidify the beard (hence, 'sour'). If you have Celiac disease, sourdough won't be of any help.

    Making a sourdough starter is easy and takes just a couple of moments a day, not much more time than feeding a cat. Sourdough starters are sort of like pets--they need to be fed. Once you have a good starter going, you only need to 'feed' it every week or so.

    To create a sourdough starter, I think it's best to start with rye flour. Whole grain, organic rye is best. Rye is naturally high in yeast and lactobacilli strains and is most likely to give you a good starter. The other key ingredients are clean water (must be chlorine-free) and time. After that, the yeasts and natural bacteria do all the work.

    I keep the house at about 60-62ºF (15-16ºC) in winter. This slows things down a bit. If your house is warmer, your starter may get going faster.

    This is going to sound complicated, but it isn't. You're just adding a bit of water and flour to a mix every day for a week or so. Takes two to three minutes a day.

    Day 1: mix a couple of tablespoons (50gm) of rye flour with an equal amount of chlorine-free water (I use spring water, but you can boil your tap water, and then let it sit over night to get rid of most of the chlorine.). You should now have a thick, sticky mess. It should be the consistency of a thick pancake batter. Add a touch extra water if need, but honesty it doesn't really matter. Just mix a bit of rye and a bit of water. Place the mix in a container that can be covered, but still vent. A small canning jar with a hole poked in the lid is perfect. As the starter develops, it will produce gas and pressure can build up--so the container needs to vent. Then stick the container in a dark place at room temp.

    Looks like a lot of work because of all the words there but it isn't: mix a little water and rye and stick it in a dark place. Simple.

    Day 2: have a beer or watch some football. Or both.

    Day 3: have a peek at your biology experiment. It should (might) be showing some signs of life now: small bubbles, maybe a bit of expansion as it puffs up. If not, no worries. Now, discard half the goop in the jar. Into the compost bin or the rubbish bin. To the remaining half of your baby starter, add 50 mL of clean, chlorine-free water. Mix that in. Then add 50 gm or so of Rye flour and make a new batter. Stick back in its dark spot for another 24 hours.

    Day 4: Repeat step three. Toss out half or more of the baby-starter, add more water and rye flour. Leave be for 24 hours.

    Day 5: You should be seeing some signs of life at this point, chiefly bubbles as the starter begins to ferment. If not, make sure you are using chlorine-free water. Repeat step three: toss half, mix in more water and flour.

    Day 6: Judgement time. A well developed starter will produce masses of bubbles at this point. And it should smell like funky fermented stuff. Mine has a whiff of alcohol to it, almost beer-like, but without the hops aroma. If your starter is at this point, you are in business! Now you need to decide if you want to use it now or save it for later. Also, do you want to stick with rye (and why not?) or use other flours to feed your starter (I use mostly whole wheat flour. White is OK, but the yeast prefers whole wheat and rye.).

    If your starter isn't bubbling, repeat step 3: discard half, add water (chlorine-free, is it chlorine free?) and flour. Let rest in a cool dark spot for another 24 hours.

    Assuming you've got yourself a healthy little starter here, but don't want to use it quite yet, here's how to store it: discard half to 3/4 of the starter, add water and flour, let it sit at room temp for an hour or so, then stick it in the fridge. This is your 'mother' starter. In the fridge, the starter will continue to mature, but slowly. You can keep it there for a week without any attention.

    After a week, it's a good idea to pull it out, discard half, add water and flour. If you let it go two weeks, it will start looking a bit suspect. Toss out the crudy bits, and refresh with water and flour. If you leave it in the fridge too long, the alcohol and lack of oxygen in the starter will kill it off. You'll likely need to start again (but....you'd be surprised how durable these starters can be.)

    When you want to make a pizza crust or bread, take a few spoons of starter and mix with 100mL water and 100gm flour. Let that sit out for 12-24 hours (until it is good and bubbly), then use that in place of commercial packaged yeast. Be sure to give the 'mother' starter a feed with some fresh water and flour, then pop it back into the fridge.

    Some people who bake often, just leave their mother starter out at room temperature and refresh it every day. I don't bake that much and it seems like too much work, so mine gets happily stored in the fridge.

    I've read statements from people who have firm rules about making and feeding a starter. Unless you are a commercial baker and need perfect consistency, it's all nonsense. Sourdough was a happy accident discovered ten thousand years ago or more. As long as the natural yeasties have some fresh water and flour every once in a while they are perfectly happy to work their magic for you. They are tougher than Red Army troops dug in to Stalingrad rubble in February.

    I never measure my ingredients, I don't keep a schedule, and I don't stress over it. At some point I'll think, "oh, gee, I haven't refreshed the starter in a while." and then I try to refresh it then....or the next day.

    Give that a try. Once you have a starter going, we can talk pizza crust.
     
  18. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    thank you Jack.
    knew it took some time and effort.
    ma used to make sour dough. ill show her this, and hope she can replicate. she has plenty of time (i hope).
    thanks for your time and effort.
     
  19. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    De nada, amigo. :thumbup:
     
  20. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Although it's been mentioned before, I had thin cut fried jalapeno flavored SPAM with sunny side up fried eggs and a sliced Roma tomato for dinner last night. All cooked in one skillet. Used bacon drippings to grease the skillet down. Talk about good first class eatin' too.
     

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