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Bachelor Recipes

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by Poppy, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    This is the best bacon to use for your bacon spaghetti. The Americans will already know this, but the Canadians are sadly deficient in the bacon related sciences.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqyeDr5WDBU
     
  2. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Thanks for the input/recipes...Canned bacon just seems wrong. That's why we invented back bacon. Canadian soldiers would carry a slab on long marches. Rub a little on your feet every day, and no trenchfoot. Plus, you never go hungry. ;)
     
  3. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

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    Now you have left me wondering, a true Poppy conundrum?.......does the bacon take on the smell of the foot...........or does the foot take on the smell of the bacon.......or is there something in between? :dazed: I would suggest you throw some of that contacted bacon in the bean pot.......then you could enjoy a full ambiance of the resulting apocalyptic cuisine.
     
  4. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Dr Sholes Tactical Back Bacon Boot Inserts. Brilliant VG...
    Some spaghetti sauce, heat, crack raw eggs in. Boil to doneness. Also works with salsa.
     
  5. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    The mongols would put a slab of dried meat under their saddle and ride on it all day. By sundown it was tender and delicious, seasoned with horse sweat and urine-tanned leather. Walking on a slab of bacon all day would be much the same.
     
  6. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Hmmm. Got my bit from a memory of ?Edisons Raiders? when they were in ?Nicaragua? Haiti?- The natives advised carrying some beef suet? and to rub their feet with it before a long march. And to not wash too much of it off. Would protect the feet and prevent ?blisters?- jungle rot?...Sorry. Too lazy to look it up.
     
  7. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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  8. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Tin Can Sandwich Bread- a cool way to reuse a can and bake fresh bread!

    1 cup warm water
    1 tablespoon olive oil
    1 egg, slightly beaten
    salt to taste
    1/4 cup finely minced sun-dried tomato
    1/3 cup finely grated Parmesan cheese
    1 cup whole wheat flour
    2 cups all purpose flour
    1 package (or 1 tablespoon) yeast


    Mix 1 c. all purpose flour, yeast and 1 c. warm water, mixing well until smooth, add remaining ingredients into the bowl all at once and mix to form a dough.

    Spray insides of two tall tomato-juice-size cans with non-stick cooking spray or carefully grease them.

    Divide dough in half in equal piece and place it inside the cans
    Cover cans with a clean dry dish towel and let rise for an hour

    Place cans in cold oven

    Turn oven on to 400 degrees and allow bread to heat inside oven for 15 minutes

    After 15 minutes, turn oven down to 350

    Let bake for 15 more minutes at 350

    Let cool and enjoy!
     
  9. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Fifty ate is a hobo. Five star hobo.

    Question- aren't cans interiors coated with -stuff- that might melt off after temps higher than those achieved in a car left in the sun?

    Used to consume beans/chili in cans baked on campfire.
     
  10. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    I guess you can boil them out prior to using them. Or scrub them real good, either one. I've cooked cans of beans over a fire and ate them without any side effects that I know of so far. Spam too. Swish some rot gut whiskey around in them first come to think of it. That'll take care of whatever's in there.
     
  11. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Would a chardonnay work? I am not a savage hobo.
     
  12. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    your suspender is showing...
     
  13. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    (blush)
     
  14. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Mad Dog 20/20 would be better.
     
  15. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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  16. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Oooooh now you're really getting back to your roots.
     
  17. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    Actually, never tried night train. But it is a great name for liquor. There was a song, that had "night train" in it, and have always used the term for anything dirty (fun) since..."WOO HOO, here comes the night train." etc etc.
     
  18. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    Back to roots, ummmmmm, growing up in rural Alabama we had a rule that you never shot anything unless you ate it. So if you shot a squirrel or rabbit , you skinned and cleaned it and cut it up not unlike a chicken. then lightly and slowly brown in in an old seasoned cast iron skillet in a little oil, now I would use olive oil, then we always has some grease from previous cookings . this produced a lightly friend crust on the critter. Next make a plain white gravy out of flour, salt and pepper and milk, quite thick. Put the critter in a iron pot, smother in gravy and slow cook until the meat came apart. . Serve with the usual stuff but eat with your fingers !

    An alternative, add onions, carrots, potatoes, etc. to the pot and make a stew. No Michelin stars but beyond good.

    Traveling in Europe with students, the richer of which ate out but to feed the others I formed a cooking club. We had a wok and a boiler and for my part I concocted this.....still make and eat it. Boil spaghetti and in the wok put a little olive oil. Add sliced bell peppers, red, orange, green, some sun dried tomatoes, some sweet onions and sauté it . Buy a rotisserie chicken dice it up and dumped it at the end. Put over the spaghetti, add French bread and some fairly drinkable wine....Great meal.

    We Southerners know this but if the foreigners (furriners) are interested I will post a Gumbo recipe. the wife does not like it so I cook it up in the fall and eat it for days after having frozen some for later. You have to have a gumbo file, a mixture of spices and herbs but if anyone is interested I will send you a package , postpaid. Skipper, even to France, if the French Customs will let it in. ! A Louisiana version of a bouillabaisse :) !

    Massa Gaines
     
  19. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper

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    It is such a pleasure to hear from you Gaines. Suspect you subscribe to the opinion that sugar catches more flies than vinegar.

    Recipes, baby. Lets hear what Gaines can make on a dime.

    Gumbo me.
     
  20. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    It's funny how cultures merge and create new dishes. Gaine's gumbo is a collision of French, Spanish and American indian cuisine in Louisiana. In the great lakes states Succotash was a dish in the same vein. You boil Lima beans and sweet corn together, with cubed catfish thrown in at the end. You don't boil it like a soup, but simmer it adding just a little water as needed so it comes out thick, like a casserole.
    That's the pure Indian version above, and the way country people would make it when I was a kid - no spices except a little salt. There's a thousand variations to that, with different spices and so on. Some people leave out the fish, which makes me wonder why they still call it succotash. It's not as tasty as gumbo, but not a bad way to stretch fish when you don't have much.
     

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