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Did service rivalry kill Americans on Omaha beach

Discussion in 'Western Europe' started by Dracula, Jul 15, 2018.

  1. scott livesey

    scott livesey Member

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    yes, "5-10 million unnecessary deaths as a result of WW2 lasting 6 months longer than it should have" and not just an LVT but "The Hobart Buffalo", with a picture at the bottom of the page of a LVT in calm water, non-combat(no weapons visible, half the soldiers wearing ball caps). Now the sides of LVT are steel plate and may deflect .30 caliber bullet. An LVT is open top and the bad guys are above, not good. An LVT may be tracked, but it has half the speed of a LCVP in the water. Nowhere did he say how the next waves get in. I guess my magic LVT cruises to the beach, shoots out pillboxes, up the draws, discharge the troops, back to the water, back to the ship.
    my final thought. depending on where you read it, between 125,000 and 175,000 landed on D-Day(midnite to midnite). Allied casualties about 5,000. so 150,000 landed, 5000 casualties works out to 3.3%, not bad for an opposed landing on a hostile shore.
     
  2. Carronade

    Carronade Ace Patron  

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    So D-Day was successful, casualties not bad, but it could have been done so much better that the European war would have been over six months earlier, November 1944. The campaign which took eleven months from D-Day to VE Day, could have been done in five. Or is being suggested that a better D-Day would have caused the Pacific war (i.e. all of WWII) to end six months earlier? We seem to have gotten a bit beyond the question of using LVTs at Normandy......
     
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  3. scott livesey

    scott livesey Member

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    That was a quote from the book referenced by thread starter, D-Day Exposed. One of the author's theories is that LVT's at Normandy would have reduced casualties. There is even a seperate chapter on how 'Hobart' LVTs would magically be available and reduce the casualties at D-Day. We are left to wonder what would have been left behind. As I said earlier, a LVT has a bigger footprint than a M4 Sherman or a DUKW or a deuce and a half truck.
    Another part of D-Day Exposed is that theater commanders didn't want LVTs and knew the M4 Sherman was an inferior tank.
     

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