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Experts! Is this book worth reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by ULITHI, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    AFAIK the 28th were mainly involved in sealing off the Western/Southwestern edge of the 'pocket' ( ie Gers, Domfront area ) whereas most books about the Falaise Gap focus on the dramatic events in the Dives valley/St Ormel area. I've checked thorough my own books and the 28th unfortunately are only mentioned peripherally.
     
  2. pistol

    pistol Member

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  3. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Not books, but some .pdfs

    Veteran of the 229th Field Artillery, 28th Division: http://www.webjmd.com/war/wwiibook.pdf
    Connecticut Men of the 28th Infantry Division: http://cslib.cdmhost.com/cdm/singleitem/collection/p128501coll19/id/75/rec/1
    (although not directly concerning Falaise) Master's Thesis on the 28th ID from September to December, 1944: http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a284499.pdf

    WW2 28th ID Veterans with digitized collections over at the Library of Congress "Veterans History Project": http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/vhp/search?query=28th+infantry&field=serviceUnit&war=worldwarii&branch=army&digitalCollection=yes
     
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  4. Dot

    Dot New Member

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    Thank you Martin Bull, pistol, and Takao for the information. I will be sure to read these suggestions.

    Again, Thanks

    Dot
     
  5. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    I very much enjoyed the book. I think I read it first in Middle School though. Later found out my old scoutmaster had served on PT boats in the Pacfic but later than mentioned in that book. Related to that you might want to read:
    http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USN/CloseQuarters/
     
  6. Comrade General

    Comrade General Member

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    Just picked up In Deadly Combat, the memoir by Gottlob Bidermann about the Eastern Front. Got it for a few bucks because of the Glantz blurb on the back. Any good?
     
  7. BenjaminJ

    BenjaminJ New Member

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    I just finished the book recently, and while theres more up to date stuff, there is a ton of first hand stuff in it, plus he was in constant contact with Halder, which is a bonus. It was definitely a great read.
     
  8. MPoorthuis

    MPoorthuis New Member

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    I agree. Both Evans' and Shirer's books are great, but I prefer Shirer's account of the rise and fall of the Third Reich.
     
  9. Perianne

    Perianne New Member

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    This is my second post. The reason I joined is to find a good, unbiased analysis of The Third Reich.

    Thanks for the recommendation. I have looked up Burleigh's book on Amazon and plan to order it.
     
  10. Medievalarmy

    Medievalarmy recruit

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    Is the new Max Hastings book called The Secret War: Spies, Codes and Guerrillas 1939-1945 good? Also, is there a better similar book?
     
  11. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    A rather dense tome that I found useful in understanding the Third Reich was Wages of Destruction. It is one where you'll want to read a bit then think about the ramifications of what was said. There has been considerable criticism of the military analysis/presentation in it so of more benefit for the economic information and it's resultant impacts on the Reich.
     
  12. Eric Brian Brewster

    Eric Brian Brewster New Member

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    Yes and COMMANDER IAN FLEMING was a British Naval Spy in high up places. I just posted a thread on your forum with pictures. A friend of mine living in Ontario wants this info investigated by some professional historian that does not mind getting secret war files opened and put conspiracies to bed, My hope is that some professional historian will crack the case of the British Navy and Canadian Navy Conspiracy of the 5 rotor Enigma Code Machine being sent to Britain and how it was first obtained will be revealed. I think a number of German Uboaters will also be interested as their families will be....namely Uboat 1006 how it got to Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia, Canada.
     
  13. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    U-1006 was sunk 9 October 1944 and is at 60°59′N 4°49′W.
     
  14. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

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    brilliant aviation memoir. Really well written and evocative
     
  15. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Wow! I found Shirer's The Rise and Fall.... to be an outstanding book and continue to recommend it today. It's hard for me to believe it's no longer relevant. However, based on your recommendation, I just ordered a used copy of the Burleigh history. Thanks! :thumbup:
     
  16. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I bought Shirer's book when it came out in paperback the first time. Needed a big dictionary and two teachers...
     
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  17. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    To be fair, I didn't actually say that it was 'irrelevant', just rather superseded by the many years of research, fresh documentary evidence, etc subsequently carried out by many other historians. Shirer's book isn't 'wrong' and remains a good starting point.
     
  18. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Thanks for the clarification, Martin!

    While we're on Shirer, I picked up a used copy of his book The Nightmare Years. Haven't read it yet.....

    Any thought on this volume?

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    Any of you rouges have an opinion on this book ©2108?

    [​IMG]


    I got this at a good price and thought I'd risk it. I find Beevor to be highly readable, but he does seem a bit opinionated at times.

    Review by John C. McManus:

    "Beevor covers much more than just Arnhem. Indeed, one could argue that this fine volume is the most comprehensive ever written about Market Garden, particularly its aftermath and profound consequences for Holland.

    Beevor clearly is no fan of Montgomery, whom the author takes to task for the debacle. Another target of his opprobrium is Lieutenant General Frederick “Boy” Browning, British commander of the I Airborne Corps, and an ineffective dilettante who proved himself ill-suited to lead such a complex operation. While these two men deserve plenty of blame, Beevor is too easy on General Dwight D. Eisenhower, the U.S. supreme commander who did, after all, authorize Market Garden, much to his later and admitted chagrin. Regardless, this book is the best I have read on the topic since journalist Cornelius Ryan’s brilliant A Bridge Too Far."​
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2020
  20. Jack B

    Jack B Active Member Patron  

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    It seems I need to brush up on my understanding of Anzio. Looking around, this tome caught my eye:

    [​IMG]


    Worth a read? :confused::_?:
     

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