Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Famous, funny or suitable nicknames for weapons/equipment

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by Triton, Dec 25, 2015.

  1. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    6,329
    Likes Received:
    1,705
    Location:
    The Arid Zone
    Surprised, I'm sure. Then dead and feeling nothing.

    Mine was a C. Sharps Arms rifle and I used the original style 500 grain slugs. I used 7 or 8 grains of Bullseye behind 120 grains of black powder. The Bullseye (a modern pistol powder) gave you a more complete burn of the black powder which was something they didn't have in those days. Still, those big slugs have very little drift and once you have the range you can ring a steel plate with amazing consistency out at 1000 yards or even more. The original Sharps .45/110 and .45/120 weighed about 19 pounds. The modern ones weigh about 12 or 13 pounds. Unless you custom order the gun, you still get that narrow, curved steel butt which hurts like hell! But, it's worth it when you pull the trigger, then hear that gong ring a few seconds later. The .45/120 was a bit much once I got out of competition shooting, but I had another in .45/70 that I regret selling.
     
  2. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,490
    Likes Received:
    1,076
    Australian Beaufighters..."whispering death"...nicknamed by the Japanese...
     
  3. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    12,312
    Likes Received:
    1,232
    Location:
    Michigan
    Do the US names for the Japanese planes count? I.e. Zero, Kate, etc.
     
  4. Karjala

    Karjala Don Quijote

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2012
    Messages:
    1,224
    Likes Received:
    115
    Location:
    Pohojanmaa, Finland

    Attached Files:

  5. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    Messages:
    5,945
    Likes Received:
    760
    Location:
    Phoenix Arizona
    LST = Large Slow Target. A very apt description.
     
  6. Triton

    Triton New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2015
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Germany
    No Sir :salute:
    Not given by soldiers.
    Does anybody know, why the german planes didn't deserve codenames?

    The italian food in Africa called A.M. had many interpretaions, which weren't flattering.

    "The tins were stamped with the initials AM which stood for "Administrazione Militare" but the Germans always refereed to this as Alte Mann (Old Man) or as some Italians called it "Asinus Mussolini" (Mussolini's Arse) due to it's rancid taste but they went one better calling it Arabio Morte (Dead Arab). Captured tins of British corned beef, white bread, jam, hard tack biscuits and tinned fruit were considered a luxury and was most a most welcome supplement to the bland tasting rations issued to the Afrika Korps."
    http://deutsches-afrikakorps.blogspot.de/2010/12/life-in-afrika-korps.html

    The german heavy bomber He 177 was the "Reichsfeuerzeug", because the twin engines were prone to catch fire.
    And the japanese Betties were the "one-hit-lighters", but i'm not sure about it, every japanese plane seems to catch fire easily.
     
  7. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2013
    Messages:
    4,254
    Likes Received:
    222
    Location:
    MIDWEST
    great question.....! I never realized or thought about it
    http://ww2db.com/other.php?other_id=32

    here is a list of Japanese code names and a short paragraph on who developed the names
     
  8. Sheldrake

    Sheldrake Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    1,634
    Likes Received:
    454
    Location:
    London UK
    Soldiers have given lots of nicknames to their food throughout history.

    Pre 1900 British soldiers ate a porridge known as "Burgoo." They adopted foreign words for food such as Portuguese "Pong" from the peninsular (Possibly the original of the naval nickname for British army as "Pongos." I don't have the historic slang dictionary to hand, but the modern version is here http://www.arrse.co.uk/wiki/Category:Rations. Example.

     
  9. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    Messages:
    5,945
    Likes Received:
    760
    Location:
    Phoenix Arizona
    Another Soviet nickname of sorts was explaining away "USA" serial numbered vehicles. The Soviets took to saying (and I probably spelled this in a hash so maybe one of our members who speaks Russian can correct that) that it stood for Uybat Sukimsim Adolpha, or "Kill that SOB Adolf!
     
  10. mac_bolan00

    mac_bolan00 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    717
    Likes Received:
    20
    at guadalcanal, lone japanese reconnaissance planes were either "louie the louse" or "washing machine charlie."
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    11,572
    Likes Received:
    1,943
    The T-34 had double hatches for a while, before the single hatch was found to take less work and less metal.
     
  12. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    11,572
    Likes Received:
    1,943
    The bazooka was named for a musical instrument.
     
  13. Dave55

    Dave55 Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,377
    Likes Received:
    191
    Location:
    Atlanta
    They also called them 'Uncle Stude'
     

Share This Page