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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. belasar

    belasar Court Jester Staff Member

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    This is the point where I incert a comment about going blind, but hey I'm a classy guy.:)
     
  2. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Interesting!
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I think raw strength would make the Neanderfeller the winner in a thumb fight. I never lose at that game.
     
  4. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Interesting. He would have won the thunb fight but in arm wrestling if you in the beginning get to hold your wrist more in tight angle the one with more muscle might not win.

     
  5. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Now this is what you call a find!
    "A team of hydroarchaeologists from Zaporizhzhia led by Valeriy Nefedov, head of the Restoration Department of the Khortytsa National Reserve, made a unique find at the bottom of the Dnipro River near the village of Kanivske, Zaporizhzhia Oblast – a well-preserved cannon carriage dating back to the Cossack period.
    “Our archaeologists have found an iron-bound cannon carriage (a special mobile unit used to transport an artillery piece) dating back to the Cossack period (16th-18th centuries). It was meant to transport large-calibre artillery weighing about 2-3 tons. This is a sensational find, because, in the 40 years of underwater archeology, such objects have never been found near Khortytsia Island. Moreover, as far as I know, no such carriages of this period are exhibited in Ukrainian museums. Hundreds of guns have survived, but there aren’t so many gun carriages, even in European museums.” said the Director of the Khortytsia National Reserve, Maksym Ostapenko.
    The gun carriage was discovered at a depth of nine metres. After preliminary studies, the archaeologists removed the mud sediment from the carriage, and on November 23, raised it from the bottom of the Dnipro River. The carriage will be transported to the restoration hangar of the Museum of Navigation, where scientists will work to clean and restore it."
    Remarkable find near Khortytsia. Underwater archaeologists raise ancient Cossack gun carriage to surface
     
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  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]
     
  7. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    Looks like part of a late 17th century or 18th century siege train
     
  8. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    A fast food bar has been uncovered in Pompeii - it looks as if it would not be out of place in some modern high streets - wonder what it was called - Legate Sanderi? Pompeii: Ancient 'fast food' counter to open to the public
    It served hot food. Various emperors banned those in Rome itself from serving hot food so afeared were they of fires. I suppose when you are in a town adjacent to a volcano a chip pan fire is the least of your worries!
     
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2020
  9. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    From the pictograms I'd say it was run by Koreans.
     
  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    But...wouldn't you need a slow cooker for snails...?:D:p
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I've been to place where the snail brought the food. :mad:
     
  12. ARWR

    ARWR Active Member

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    The earliest evidence of the domestication of animals for food is a Neolithic snail farm. Doubtless they could have picked wild garlic but what they did for butter when cooking them - who knows?
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    That's not domestication, that's just confined wildlife.
     
  14. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    Yeah, but did it have a "drive thru". If not, then I'm not impressed. ;)
     
  15. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    I find the fact of lava instead interesting. Whether it was Pompeii or Napol. I watched a document that in Napol the ground is going up and down 5-20 cms almost daily due to the "lava" amount underground. If it goes really high we know there is more to come soon. So it was either place and Pompeii got the worse cards, the wrong side.
     
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  16. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Archaeology breakthrough: Divers found Churchill's sunken WW2 treasure worth £150m

    Divers found Churchill's sunken WW2 treasure worth £150m


    The ship, SS Gairsoppa, was downed during the global conflict as war-time Prime Minister Winston Churchill tried to transport silver from India to pay for Britain's campaign. The vessel exhausted the majority of its fuel while travelling to Galway, Ireland, when a German U-boat fired a torpedo that sank her with the loss of 85 lives. The riches that lay on the ship were lost, until 2011, when an operation to recover the £150million's worth silver bullion was successful.
     
  17. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    If nobody is interested £150m sill can be çseñd to me. ..@@
     
  18. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Summat biblical for a change.
    "ARCHAEOLOGY experts in Israel have unearthed a small seal linked to an ancient king of Judah 2,700 years ago. Experts believe the so-called LMLK seal was stamped on royal taxes and treasures of the Biblical King Hezekiah.
    Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) have uncovered the royal seal during excavations in the Arnona neighbourhood of Jerusalem. The clay seal has been linked to the Kingdom of Judah, an Iron Age kingdom that stretched across the Southern Levant from 930 to 586 BC. These types of seals are known as LMLK (read: lamelekh) seals, which stands for the Hebrew letters "lamedh mem ladh kaph".
    The ancient Hebrew script translates to "of the king" or "belonging to the king".
    The first LMLK seals were issued around the year 700 BC during the reign of Hezekiah, 13th king of Judah.
    Hezekiah is one of the most prominent Biblical monarchs in the Old Testament and is even mentioned in the New Testament's Gospels in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
    Hezekiah's own personal seal was uncovered during excavations at Jerusalem's Ophel in 2015.
    The IAA said of its latest discovery: "The seal was found alongside an enormous collection of seal impressions."
    www.express.co.uk/news/science/1389130/archaeology-news-royal-seal-king-of-judah-lmlk-seal-hezekiah-israel-evg
     
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  19. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    No Elvis impressions? ;)

    (Sorry. Can't even blame it on auto-correct.)
     
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  20. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Roman road remains

    Remains of a Roman road which pre-dates Hadrian's Wall have been uncovered in Northumberland.

    The find, which is almost two thousand years old, was made during work on the water network near Settlingstones.

    They are thought to be from the road's foundations and built by Agricola or his successors about AD80, although no evidence of its exact date was found.
     
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