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German fighter called Sack AS6 V-1

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by TA152, Dec 27, 2002.

  1. TA152

    TA152 Ace

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    I was surfing the net and came across this site with a profile drawing of a German aircraft called the Sack AS6 v-1. I thought I seen and heard all of the German types from William Green's books but this is new to me. All it said about the plane is it was a fighter. Can anyone recommend sites to get more information on the type. It looks like a green pancake!!
    http://www.cbrnp.com/profiles/quarter2/sack_as6.htm
     
  2. Peppy

    Peppy Idi Admin

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    Yeah that's a wierd plane al right, but if you could see it from the top, it would look even more wierd. The wing surface, unlike other wings, is a big round disk. It's hard to explain unless you see a photo. I'll try to find one...
     
  3. Peppy

    Peppy Idi Admin

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    Found it!! Odd huh?

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Peppy

    Peppy Idi Admin

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    another image, this one taken in 1944.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    Of course you all are noting the familiar round shape of the hover like wings. There was experiments with two protypes of a/c for use on aircraft carriers and other operational ships for take off and landings......Oooooohhh, pretty kuhl uh ?

    also if any of you can grab a copy of the old jet planes of the third reich by Monogram publications. Well OOP but some very interesting forward and rear wing concepts done in the trial stages. And we wonder where our air forces get some of their ideas......heck it was developed 55 + years ago dudes !

    E
     
  6. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Cool stuff on a Germany "Flying Disk" aircraft. Ive never seen this one before. Good stuff Peppy-Erich-TA-152.
     
  7. Erich

    Erich Alte Hase

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    It might be beneficial to check the www.luft46.com site thouroughly for more tasty treats ! Also schiffer pubs has done several books on Luftwaffe odities and what-if's in the past. Would be nice to access the National ARchiv's here in the Staes to see the drawng board what-if's that the third reich techs and in process. It's all there but access to these secrets and they still are secret's many of them maybe a bit hard to do....who knows......anyone ?

    E *<;)
     
  8. De Vlaamse Leeuw

    De Vlaamse Leeuw Member

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    Very strange plane. I know that the Luftwaffe wanted do innovate, but this.
     
  9. Carl G. E. von Mannerheim

    Carl G. E. von Mannerheim Ace

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    That my friends is a Foo Fighter
     
  10. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Some stories on these UFO´s:

    AS6, The Story of a Nazi "UFO"

    The public presentation of Sack's flying saucer took place during the celebration of the First National Contest for Air Models With Combustion Motors,held on the 27 and 28 of June, 1939 in Leipzig-Mockau (Germany).

    Arthur Sack's model measured 1,250 mm and weighed 4,500 grams, powered by a built-in Kratmo-30 motor, 0.65 V and 4,500 RPM with a propeller measuring 600mm in diameter.

    Those participating in the event, which was wisely held behind closed doors, had to cover a round-trip flight utilizing the simplest guidance mechanism available. Nonetheless, this early attempt at using small models for tactical reconnaissance purposes proved to be a resounding failure. Most of the models, fitted with the so-called "self-guidance device" and their respective motors, displayed their worst qualities.

    The only truly remotely guided model, built by Sinn, broke down at the starting line, while another, equipped with a steam turbine built by Soll, caught fire. It was a veritable disaster.

    Sack didn't escape the rash of bad luck. His "flying saucer" was unable to lift off the ground, and finally, Sack had to throw it into the air himself. After this "assisted takeoff", the model managed to perform 100 meters of stable flight, just barely reaching the finish line. Sack fine-tuned his designed following this experience in order to achieve longer, quicker flights. In spite of it all, Arthur Sack was extremely fortunate, since among the spectators to the event was General-Air Minister Udet, who was deeply impressed by the concept.

    Udet became a strong supporter of the military use of "flying saucers," assigning them the role hitherto developed for barrage balloons. He promised Sack that he would "smooth the road for further research."

    No sooner said than done: Arthur Sack built some additional "flying saucer" models prior to beginning the construction of a manned aircraft in the midst of the war years at the MIMO plant (Mitteldeutsche Motorwerke) in Leipzig. The final design, which received the nomenclature of AS6, was completed at the Brandis flight shop (Flugplatz-Werkstatt) in early 1944.

    The very first AS6 prototype was equipped with an Argus 10cc, 140 HP engine, and a 6.40 meters thick circular wing with a Gottinger profile. For a flight weight estimated at some 750 - 800 kgs., the wing load must have been some 25 to 30 kilos per square meter. Therefore, it almost fit within the measurement parameters of a Klemm 25D.

    Finally, with the prototype already in the hangar, all that was needed was to find a pilot--which Sack was not--and begin testing.

    Baltabol, the very same flight leader of the ATG (formerly known as DFW) began to work on the AS6 in April, 1944. He remarked upon seeing the saucer: "The aircraft makes a very positive impression, and its external aspect is very good. However, it cannot be categorically described as a clean piece of work, taking into consideration the resources available at Brandis for its utilization."

    Baltabol's statement turned out to be prophetic, as the first experiments with the "flying saucer" were burdened with complications. During the prototype's initial roll-out, both the shape and an unfortunate pedal adjustment caused the rudder and the brake to fail. A crack in the spur put a premature end to this early attempt.

    In the April 1979 issue, Lufthart International, the German aeronautical magazine, detailed the first test flights by the Nazi flying saucer.

    "The spur was strengthened later on by a steel rail in the fashion of a faired beam, and as soon as the pedal was relocated to a more convenient position, the test flight took place. Baltabol attempted five takeoffs from the 1.2 Km runway at Brandis, but the rudder was extremely hard. The right strut on the landing gear cracked during the final effort."

    Upon examination of this problem, the pilot's advice regarding the tranference of the landing gear some 20 cm. to the rear was implemented, a move that required reinforcement of the aircraft's rear. But in the end, the measure would be redoubled, since the builders believed that the landing gear should be moved back by 40 cm., which would cause the prototype's nose to tip forward, and Baltabol refused to accept the responsibility for a takeoff under such conditions, particularly considering the subsequent changes effected to the rudder and the braking pedals.

    In spite of these and other modifications, the AS6 did not take off on its following test: after rolling down the runway some 600 meters, the aircraft's nose showed no inclination whatsoever to lift off the ground.

    New modifications were made and a new attempt was executed. This time, the saucer would roll to the runway's maximum length of 700 meters in total calm (there was no wind). When Baltabol accelerated, the AS6 picked up speed and after 500 meters down the runway, its landing gear lifted off the ground. The Nazi saucer had made its first leap into space.

    However, the illusion was as brief as the leap itself. The aircraft touched down once more, and after several pilot-controlled bounces, Baltabol decided to forgo the takeoff attempt upon seeing the end of the runway grow dangerously near. For the following test, Baltabol took advantage of lift forces, causing the machine to roll at a greater angle, thus obtaining a longer--but not higher--skyward jump. A sequel to the test, conducted the same day, did not meet greater success, since the propeller gave the vehicle a strong inclination which interfered with its movement.

    According to Lufthart, Baltabol suggested that a new series of wind-tunnel experiments be performed in order to calibrate the vehicle's exact flight and takeoff characteristics. Later on, it would be another pilot, Franz Rosle, who would test Sack's flying saucer in the summer of 1944, although he too would experience certain difficulties, such as a new crack in the landing gear.

    The harried final month of the war surprised the Brandis field, interrupting testing on the AS6. From that moment onward, the prototype's story is lost amid the confusion of the armed conflict. Nonetheless, Lufthart points out that in the fall of that very same year, a flying saucer was sighted over the Neubiderg aerodrome, near Munich. There exists the possibility that this UFO was proof that the AS6 had finally overcome all its technical setbacks.

    In any case, the AS6's complex history, from a model imagined by a German farmer to its manufacture as a Nazi military prototype, constitutes a fine example of the existence of "flying saucers" half a century ago, which bore no relation whatsoever with alien spacecraft...and it wasn't the only one

    And more here:
    http://www.inexplicata.com/issue1/aeronautical_history.html
     
  11. TA152

    TA152 Ace

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    Thank you everyone for the information and picture of the AS6. I wish I could interview the pilot Mr Batlabol, if he is still alive. He is alot more brave than I would be to test fly such a different bird!
    Also I wish I could find out what became of the aircraft, I guess it got scraped since the jet age was coming in, but still I kind of like the plane, it grows on you after you look at it for awhile!!
     
  12. Carl G. E. von Mannerheim

    Carl G. E. von Mannerheim Ace

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    Perhaps it ended up in the Smithsonian like some of those German Flying Wings?

    CvM

    [ 29. December 2002, 01:11 PM: Message edited by: Carl G.E. von Mannerheim ]
     
  13. Alejandro Espinosa

    Alejandro Espinosa Member

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  14. Alejandro Espinosa

    Alejandro Espinosa Member

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  15. TA152

    TA152 Ace

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    Thank you for the additional information and great pictures and welcome to the forums.
    What a shame the plane had to get broken up just for the wood !
     

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