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Guadalcanal - An Airfield Too Far?

Discussion in 'Air War in the Pacific' started by bronk7, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    No more effectively than they did at Guadalcanal. The distance would preclude the use of the new A6M3 Model 32, which had 20% less range. Unless or until a closer base to Esprito was found. Just as the A6M3 was not seen over Guadalcanal until the closer satellite fields opened up. With the A6M2s limited to about 15 minutes over Guadalcanal, they would also be limited to 15 minutes over Esprito.
     
  2. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    I don't know. I never really bought into the whole victory disease spiel. Yamamoto planned Midway just as thoroughly as he did Pearl, and he wanted to fight it just as he did Pearl, and nothing was going to stand in his way.

    I have always attributed the poor planning to the fact that the Japanese had no "end game". There was no one point that the Japanese could reach and say "the war ends when we get to this spot." The US War Plan Orange "end game" was to capture some island bases near Japan and blockade her into submission/surrender. The Japanese did not have that. Their "end game" was "we achieve quick victories and the Allies surrender". Except, the surrender offer did not come, so they needed more victories. It is a downward spiral.
     
  3. bronk7

    bronk7 Well-Known Member

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    ..yes, like other wars--modern and old--if there is no final objective/''major'' objective/basic objective -then you have problems
    ..but how far in advance did they plan for Midway?
     

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