Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Interesting facts of military history

Discussion in 'Military History' started by Kai-Petri, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
    The things you learn.
    "This is a model of an Aerial Torpedo Dr. Henry W. Walden made in 1915 for a patent application. The missile was to be air-launched against ground targets and controlled by radio signals from the mother aircraft. The pilot would visually observe the Torpedo and activate the controls through radio signals. The signals activated servos that moved steering vanes on the Torpedo. Although Walden's patent was granted, it never became official; he never paid the fee, having received no support from the US government."
    http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?id=A19580052000
     
  2. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,549
    Likes Received:
    1,065
    Location:
    Michigan
    I think there might be a minor "typo" here.
     
  3. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
    First British shots of WW1 in Europe were fired during an engagement between C Squadron, 4th Dragoon Guards and German Uhlans near Le Casteau, Belgium on 22nd August 1914.
    The last shots of the war were fired by the 116 Canadian Infantry Reg. also near Le Casteau on 11th November 1918-
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwars/wwone/firstshot_01.shtml
     
  4. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  5. Steve Anderson

    Steve Anderson New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2014
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Soldiers would kick a football back and forth as they charged out of the trenches during assaults.”

    That's from a great recent article about the role football (soccer) played in the tragic meat grinder of WWI. That senseless slaughter combined with a game I love haunts me. Here's the full article, titled "Soccer in Oblivion":

    http://grantland.com/features/world-war-one-soccer-game/
     
  6. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  7. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
    First VC of WW1 was awarded posthumously to Lieutenant Maurice Dease of the Royal Fusiliers at the battle of Mons, 23rd August 1914.
    http://1914centenary.com/2013/08/24/lieutenant-maurice-dease-vc/
    However, the first VC of the war to be officially listed in the London Gazette was awarded to Captain Francis Grenfell of the 9th Lancers on 24th August 1914, also at the battle of Mons-
    http://www.nam.ac.uk/microsites/war-horse/explore/charge/%E2%80%98the-first-vc-of-the-european-war%E2%80%99-1914/
     
  8. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  9. Takao

    Takao Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    7,153
    Likes Received:
    1,395
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    Much the same can be said about baseball here in the United States.
     
  10. Smiley 2.0

    Smiley 2.0 Smiles

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,448
    Likes Received:
    173
    Location:
    The Land of the Noble Steed
    Something I discovered when I read Cornelius Ryan's book "The Longest Day" was that there was only one major Luftwaffe attack on the Normandy beaches on D-day. It was done by Luftwaffe ace Josef Priller.
     
  11. Takao

    Takao Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    7,153
    Likes Received:
    1,395
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    That is one of Ryan's very few failures. Luftflotte 3 flew a little over 300 sorties against the Normandy beaches during the day, and another 200 some the night of June 6/7. Still, the Luftwaffe was effectively absent from the battlefield the first few days, when you compare the 300 German sorties against the 14,674 sorties that the Allies flew against Normandy on June 6, 1944.
     
  12. Smiley 2.0

    Smiley 2.0 Smiles

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2014
    Messages:
    1,448
    Likes Received:
    173
    Location:
    The Land of the Noble Steed
    I should read a little more into that. I got the impression that because the Luftwaffe strength in the Normandy area was very weak compared to the air dominance of the Allies that the Luftwaffe was unable to perform any kind of sorties against the Allies on D-Day. But like you said when you compare 300 to 14,674....
     
  13. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,549
    Likes Received:
    1,065
    Location:
    Michigan
    Well there could have been only one major attack on the beaches. I would think the ships would have been where most of the effort went as far as the 300 sorties is concerned. In this regard what was considered a "major attack"?
     
  14. andrwoo

    andrwoo New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2015
    Messages:
    79
    Likes Received:
    30
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I liked seeing this. Major Patrick Ferguson (1744–1780) is my 1st cousin 10x removed :salute: (My 8th great grandfathers 1st cousin)
     
  15. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  16. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  17. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,549
    Likes Received:
    1,065
    Location:
    Michigan
  18. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  19. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist Patron  

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    18,590
    Likes Received:
    1,971
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
  20. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2002
    Messages:
    21,918
    Likes Received:
    987
    Location:
    Kotka,Finland
    On November 16, 1933, President Franklin Roosevelt ended almost 16 years of American non-recognition of the Soviet Union following a series of negotiations in Washington, D.C. with the Soviet Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Maxim Litvinov.

    https://history.state.gov/milestones/1921-1936/ussr
     

Share This Page