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Loudest artillery?

Discussion in 'Artillery' started by Poppy, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    I'll support your threadjack, for a moment, the 16"/50 of the Missouri are the loudest guns I ever heard. During West Pac '90 aboard the Pelilieu there would be standing room only at the rails anytime the Missouri was close.
     
  2. Vinny Maru

    Vinny Maru Member

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    After digging into an old book by Hogg, my guess is that the loudest gun (of those that were likely to be encountered on the field) would have been the U S 240mm howitzer. I'm baseing that on the fact that it was the largest diameter bore and heaviest projectile in what he classifies as field artillery, and it also looks to have a short barrell. There were others in that class, but for various reasons were not fielded in any numbers or were seldom used.

    This excludes coastal defense, rail guns, and those very low production models like the German siege guns (60cm, etc) or experimental weapons like Little David.
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The first time I saw the Mo she was on one side of the pier at LBNSY and New Jersey was on the other. LHA-5 was parked seaward of them. Great view of both ships from the flight deck.
     
  4. Axonn

    Axonn Member

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  5. Victor Gomez

    Victor Gomez Ace

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    I wish we had a rogue that would give us a good description of the 16" guns that were fired. My father described one for me that was of WWI vintage that he was trained to fire.....he described it took a full 24 hours for a large crew to dig in this gun before it could even be fired. In his training it had been taken out of mothballs from WWI. I warn you this is second hand as I can only repeat what I remember my father describing. In taking it out of mothballs they had to consult a book, and develop loads for certain distances. As they approached the heavier loads of powder and fired it there were some that went unconscious for a short while from the concussive blasts. That happened in practice and he said they sometimes wore muffs and were not required. My dad was quite deaf at the end of his life but it could have been combined damage from old age and shooting the big gun. He definitely disliked the concussive blasts they had to endure while shooting the big gun. Also I rely on what an ordinance expert out of the military told me about explosive blasts. It depends on the speed of sound yes but different explosives have different speeds. For example muzzle blast has gunpowder speed. Dynamite and maybe TNT has their speed. He described the worst to endure were the HMX variety often found inside large shells. He described that explosive speed as many times the speed of sound that was unlike the bone crushing power of TNT and dynamite. He said at the same distance it would be bone crackling into many small pieces. The "Shell Shock" is caused most regularly by the HMX type that is present in shells which is like a C-4 or plastic explosive. I worked under this fellow in demilling shells and other explosives and cannot claim the experiences but some of the rogues may have more complete descriptions than I. These descriptions are from others so you are getting them second hand....so a rogue could correct me or add to this understanding.
     
  6. 1ST Chutes

    1ST Chutes Member

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    I was a Naval Gunfire Spotter for most of the time I was in the Marine Corps. I qualed Missouri in the late 80's on her 5" 38 Marine Gun Mount in the Philippines. During that qual my Gunny observed a mission for her number 2 turret main battery. She fired a one round 3 gun salvo of round HC.

    Our OP was across Talisagn Bay from the White Horse Creek Impact Area about 5000 meters. The rounds coming in sounded like a freight train the impact and concussion wave could be felt on the OP and the actual detonation oblitarated a small hill and turned it into a crater.
     
  7. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper Patron  

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    My bucket list would include being close enough to hear/feel big arty takeoff and land. ...F18 low flyby scared the hell out of me. Loud thunder too. But to feel the scream/thump of the God of War would really make my day.
     
  8. 1ST Chutes

    1ST Chutes Member

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    I had a 155mm HE round land in a draw 200 meters from my OP in 29 Palms and a 105mm MT fuzed round go off 100 meters in front of my OP at Camp Pendelton, being that close to detonating rounds is highly overrated.
     
  9. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Been to a few live fire exercises myself...can second your analysis.
    Keep looking around to see if anybody saw you flinch...and jump!

    BANG! "Fu#k sake...!"
     
  10. phylo_roadking

    phylo_roadking Member

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    Strangely enough - When I was twelve, I was blown off my feet and deafened for a day; but not by artillery...

    By Concorde going supersonic over the Irish Sea during testing in the early 1970s!

    I know now that it must have broken the Sound Barrier less than a mile away - up or sideways LOL - for me to experience the full pleasureable effects of a sonic boom; I'll warrant the noise/shockwave from nearby arty must be distinctly similar.
     
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  11. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper Patron  

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    Ha. Great stories men. Excellent. Thanks for those.
     
  12. 1ST Chutes

    1ST Chutes Member

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    Once at 29 Palms at night we had an illumination round deploy directly over our OP. The sound of "Check your fire." being screamed into radios was deafening. It wasn't the illum we were worried about it was drifting out into the impact area, but we all knew what followed the illum and didn't want a 155 round landing in our laps.

    On San Clemente Island I called in a fire mission to the USS Henry B. Wilson adjusted my mission and called for a FFE. Heard "Shot out. Rounds Complete out.........neglect." Generally neglect means they plotted the OP as the target, so I was crappin nickles. luckily they had plotted the location of the last adjustment round.
     
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  13. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper Patron  

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    HAHAHA, crappin' nickels. I suppose that's exactly what I'd do.
     
  14. Poppy

    Poppy grasshopper Patron  

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  15. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Don´t know about the loudest "bang" but breaking the enemy morale I´ve read that using katjushas or nebelwerfers would usually break the backbone of most defensive lines. No wonder they were used so often. The whistling sound and the pressure effect?
     

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