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Military Archaeology

Discussion in 'Military History' started by GRW, Jan 4, 2004.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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  2. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Sorry if this was before....

    Brit heroes among bodies of 125 WWI soldiers found entombed in German trench 101 years after they were killed

    ‘NEVER GIVEN PEACE’
    Brit heroes among bodies of 125 WW1 soldiers found entombed in German trench 101 years after they were killed

    Advancing German troops attempted to break through the defending British and French lines.

    In one of the Great War's bloodiest conflicts, 58,155 allied soldiers were killed while 46,765 Germans died in the space of a month.

    The archaeological site was known to the allies as Hill 80 and was held by the Germans until June 1917 when it was taken by British and Irish troops during the Battle of Messines.
     
  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    What a grim job.
    "Forensic archaeologists and anthropologists from Cranfield University have started to recover the bodies of victims executed by the Franco regime at the end of the Spanish Civil War during an excavation in the Ciudad Real region of Spain.
    The team from Cranfield is working with partners from the University Complutense of Madrid (UCM) and social anthropologists from Mapas de Memoria (Maps of Memory) to search for, exhume and identify those executed and buried in the civil cemetery at Almagro between 1939 and 1940.
    Several bodies with gunshot wounds to the head, personal effects and parts of clothing have already been recovered and in total the team are searching for 26 people in this excavation which is focused on a separate area of the graveyard that has been closed for decades.
    Families of victims have been found in the hope of identifying relatives through DNA analysis and returning the human remains for proper burial.
    This exhumation is part of a number of recoveries from the Spanish Civil War which are currently being investigated in Spain. Since 2000, over 7,000 victims have been recovered."
    www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-05/cu-fab052421.php
     
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  4. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Sad that it's only just been found.
    'In 1944, a US Air Force Dakota aircraft vanished over Wales en route from Paris.
    Its four passengers were believed to have died in a crash, but the plane's fate has never been revealed, until now.
    High temperatures at Llyn Dulyn meant the waters have parted to reveal a secret hidden in Snowdonia's waters for 75 years."
    Heatwave solves mystery of plane's fate from 1944
     
  5. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Nice find.
    "A shipwreck in the middle of the Southern Irish Sea, previously thought to be that of a submarine, has now been identified as the minesweeper, HMS Mercury.
    The discovery has been made as part of a joint project between Maritime Archaeologists at Bournemouth University and scientists at Bangor University’s School of Ocean Sciences, who have been combining marine archives with high-resolution multibeam sonar data to try and identify many of the unknown wreck sites located off our coast.
    Originally built as a Clyde-based ferry, HMS Mercury was requisitioned by the Admiralty in 1939 to serve as minesweeper. It sank in 1940 after being damaged by a mine that it was attempting to clear and was reported lost off Southern Ireland."
    www.bournemouth.ac.uk/news/2021-09-02/discovery-minesweeper-hms-mercury
     
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  6. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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  7. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    El Alamein, conflict archaeology to save the battlefield about to disappear - Archaeoreporter

    The El Alamein Project is an exhaustive reconnaissance of the original locations where the battles of El Alamein took place in 1942, making it a perfect example of conflict archaeology. It involves a census and an initiative to preserve the military posts, remains, documents and material evidence that can still be found in the desert west of Alexandria, Egypt, where the Italian and German Axis forces fought against the Commonwealth and other allied nations, including France (July, August and October/November 1942).

    Plans currently exist to build a large, modern city of about 2 million people between the sea and the desert. New Alamein will erase much of the battlefield and its material evidence. In fact, this process has already begun: the 8-lane motorway runs over posts that were heroically held by the Italian Folgore division. In the future, other posts will be “obliterated” as well. The El Alamein Project is also an example of public archaeology, as it sees the participation of members of the public.

    An Italian Air Force collection has made it possible to study these invaluable historical aerial photographs. A preliminary Italian aerial reconnaissance of the battlefield just before the attempted breakthrough by Axis troops proved unsuccessful due to problems with developing the photographs. A second mission managed to bring some photographic material back to base, but the Air Force units ran out of film when they reached the very spot where the Italians and Germans were supposed to cross with their tanks to outflank the British (30 August 1942). The defences and the extension of the minefields remained unknown.

    The gaps in intelligence caused precious time to be lost at a decisive moment. This event was certainly not the reason for the defeat, but it helped the Commonwealth forces, which had also intercepted useful information via Ultra to their advantage, to defend the front in the desert.
     
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