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Patton's "Notes on Combat"

Discussion in 'WWII General' started by SPGunner, Aug 31, 2009.

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  1. SPGunner

    SPGunner Member

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    Worth a read. Mix of motivational points and miscellaneous technical details like tire inflation. You can see Patton's focus on uniforms and regulations. IN CASE OF DOUBT, ATTACK!

    Notes on Combat


     
    IBBARR and marc780 like this.
  2. sniper1946

    sniper1946 Expert

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    "a pint of sweat will save a gallon of blood",great quote...
     
  3. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Considering some of the negatives that Patton is often covered with, I think this is a very interesting and cogent article. I especially liked this phrase, "There is no approved solution to any tactical situation. There is only one tactical principle which is not subject to change. It is: 'To so use the means at hand as to inflict the maximum amount of wounds, death, and destruction on the enemy in the minimum time.'"

    The emphasis on the ability to change tactics, I think, was critical to the success of the Allies.
     
  4. Jaeger

    Jaeger Ace

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    For a general who has been credited with beeing a cavalry/manouver oriented chap it was interesting to see the core of attrition doctrine given a salute.

    A great article overall since it gives insight of the great general for better or worse.
     
  5. DocCasualty

    DocCasualty Member

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    Before I post this, I wish to point out that I am an admirer of Gen. Patton. My father served in Patton's Third Army and spoke of the man as a true hero. Contrast this to comments like, "his men hated him". As an aside, it's interesting to see on this and other WWII boards just what a polarizing figure he is.

    Despite how good of a general I think he was, he certainly had his flaws. It is these flaws that I believe prevented him from becoming the truly outstanding general he could have been. Hindsight? I'm sure it is, but I offer it as no more than an opinion.

    That said, I believe that violating his own first principle as stated in this "Notes on Combat" was indeed his greatest flaw.
    It was Patton's lack of discipline in dealing with his administrative duties outside of battle that consistently got him into trouble. I don't think I need to reiterate the things he said and did that caused him problems. Funny thing, I doubt Patton saw it in this way himself, perhaps I'm wrong. Serving in another time, he may likely have risen to General of the Army. He was his own worst enemy , unable to exercise the "perfect" discipline he exhorted necessary.
     
  6. marc780

    marc780 Member

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    I thought WP was only used in the Pacific...how wrong i could be. He stresses over and over the use of smoke by artillery to allow friendly movemet and attack. But the white phospourus tactics is something i'd never heard they did!
     
  7. DocCasualty

    DocCasualty Member

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    It certainly was used in the ETO, marc. I obtained the "Record of Concentrations" (incomplete) from my dad's 155mm Howitzer Bn and WP rounds are certainly listed with many missions such as "enemy battery", locomotive, enemy vehicles, supply train, S/P gun, nebelwerfers . . . This link is a pdf of these reports, which only cover a few months in 1945 http://www.ww2f.com/attachments/rol...ttery-b-949th-fa-bn-949aconcrptsjan-mar45.pdf

    I couldn't speak to the extent of use overall or which types of arty units used it more. Perhaps Carl S. might be able to speak to the subject.
     

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