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Remembrance day...

Discussion in 'Living History' started by CAC, Nov 10, 2018.

  1. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    with an hour and a half to go before the 11th of the 11th...Australia remembers today the sacrifice of 60 thousand Aussie battlers who died on foreign soil. 100 years ago today the armistice was signed that ended the war to end all wars. Celebrations began in Sydney on the 8th as the Germans were being pushed back and winter was beginning to set in...news of the Germans making overtures for an armistice filtered back to Australia...So many Australians signing up for a war on the other side of the world...thousands would never see their island home again. So too we remember the sacrifice of thousands of animals, most Australian horses known as walers, as this breed came from New South Wales. Fast and with heavy endurance, these animals rushed the enemy with the same courage as their riders only to be cut down.

    We will miss them...we will remember them.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
  2. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    :poppy: Cyril Vivian.
    Gt. Grandad.
    38, 5 kids.
    Killed at Neuve-chapelle with the Devonshires, 10/03/15, quite likely by friendly fire.

    DOVv81sXkAAcc_O.jpg


    :poppy: John Morgan-Richards.
    Volunteered from reserve occupation.
    Killed by his jeep striking a mine shortly after arrival in Burma.
    Never spoken of by his immediate family again.
    Casualty
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    • In Flanders Fields
    BY JOHN MCCRAE

    In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.
     
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  4. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member Patron  

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    The only image I find equal to the words of Flanders Field is this one by John Singer Sargent in the Imperial War Museum.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    [​IMG]

    (Battle of Estaires.)
     
  6. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Pershing, an American general didn’t like the whole armistice idea...he thought they should push forward to Berlin and have the Germans on their knees...perhaps prophetically he said otherwise the Germans won’t believe they were defeated and that they would have to do all this again...
     
  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The then-current head of the German government told the returning troops that they hadn't been defeated. As I understand it that was the birth of the Stab in the Back mythos.
     
  8. williamlazura

    williamlazura New Member

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    On 11 November 1918, the guns of the Western Front fell silent after four years of continuous warfare. With their armies retreating and close to collapse, German leaders signed an Armistice, bringing to an end the First World War. From the summer of 1918, the five divisions of the Australian Corps had been at the forefront of the allied advance to victory. Beginning with their stunning success at the battle of Hamel in July, they helped to turn the tide of the war at Amiens in August, followed by the capture of Mont St Quentin and Pèronne, and the breaching of German defences at the Hindenburg Line in September. By early October the exhausted Australians were withdrawn from battle. They had achieved a fighting reputation out of proportion to their numbers, but victory had come at a heavy cost. They suffered almost 48,000 casualties during 1918, including more than 12,000 dead.

    In the four years of the war more than 330,000 Australians had served overseas, and more than 60,000 of them had died. The social effects of these losses cast a long shadow over the postwar decades.

    Each year on this day Australians observe one minute’s silence at 11am, in memory of those who died or suffered in all wars and armed conflicts.
     
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