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The Hoyt-Clagwell Avenger, Automatic Rifle, Mark II

Discussion in 'Military History' started by KodiakBeer, May 17, 2017 at 10:47 AM.

  1. The_Historian

    The_Historian Pillboxologist

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    Didn't the Aussies prefer the Owen as a result of the two being tested to destruction in the Brown-Knowes trials?
     
  2. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Don't know to be honest...but I'm sure its reliability had a lot to do with it.
    Top loaded so you can rest it or fire laying down and easy reload...I'm sure the top system had some to do with the reliability too, not fighting gravity...
    The Yanks liked them too apparently! We used them in Korea and Vietnam also believe it or not...
     
  3. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    They say old Enfields are fine-looking guns, and I'm particularly partial to the aesthetics of a Broomhandle Mauser or Nordenfelt, but it's hard to deny that Hoyt-Clagwells had a style all of their very own, with which they earnt their place in the pantheon of 'If it looks right, it is right'.
    You have my respect for preserving this piece of history for future generations.
     
  4. George Patton

    George Patton Canadian Refugee

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    My god, man! Do you not remember the conclusive Fessenhœfer Experiment of 1916? This demonstrated the vast superior of the German alloying processes which lead to a more ductile spring, while retaining the classic linear-elastic Hookean behaviour of the American oscillator springs. Later analysis by John D Pedersen - assisted by Major General Julian S. Hatcher - revealed this was due to the above-average isotopic abundance of plutonium-241 in the German springs, which was in lieu of the very high concentrations of californium-253 in the American oscillator springs. It was this very finding of that plutonium in small quantities leads to increased spring kinematic performance which led Hatcher to create the "Hatcher Hole" to solve the problem of catastrophic failure of early Springfield M1903 receivers. But keep in mind it cannot be stated that the omission of californium-253 was an entirely great idea. It is rumored that Dieudonné Saive was inspired by the californium-253 doped American oscillator springs to create his tilting bolt gas operated semiautomatics which - as you know - require this advanced isotopic fusion in the main recoil spring to avoid the issue of overgassing.
     
  5. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    Fessenhoefer was largely discounted as a credible source when no less a luminary than Hugo Schmeisser said the only thing ductile in Fessenhoeffer's 'experiment' was a certain teenage prostitute named Traudl. As for Saive and his tilting bolt; by that you mean John MOSES Browning, doncha'? European propaganda, all of it!
     
  6. KodiakBeer

    KodiakBeer Member

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    Rare period photo of a Hoyt-Clagwell tractor.

    [​IMG]
     

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