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U.S. Civil War History bits

Discussion in 'Military History' started by C.Evans, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    This is more than worth another :salute: and a :wolf: AMEN to our English siblings :))
     
  2. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Great jacket, any interest in selling it sometime? ;-)
     
  3. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Hi Price, im speechless, this is some amazing stuff. Im also a fan of some of the artists who did the artwork you show. some favorites are: Dale Galleon, Don Trioni and alltime faves: Don Stivors and a gent w the lastname of Greenstreet.

    Amost forgot, one of my Uncles served under Buckner and was nearby when he was killed.
     
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  4. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Hi Victor, thank you for the excellent info and wish I could recognize better for it. Most Texas units Had a large number of Hispanics in CSA service and a number also served under Gen Stand Waite and his Cherokees. At least 2 of Waites men im descended from on my Dads side. Sadly, I have no idea what their names were? Sorry for choppy reply, im typing one fingered with a sleeping cat on my lap and left arm ;-)
     
  5. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    :lol::lol::lol:
     
  6. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Yeah my brother and some of his idiot compadres thought that they were going to be funny and have "athiest" put in the religious preference of their dog tags. They were stationed at Ft. Polk and are all warrant officer pilots and strange people anyway. I never thought that doing stuff like that was a very smart thing to do when engaged in hazardous duty pursuits, but as long as they are happy, fonk'em. I had bad enough luck as it was, and that's the last thing that I wanted have to explain away at the gate if you know what I mean. While not hugely religious, I do know the rules.

    And thanks for posting that info on the Confederate units, especially the ones from Louisiana. I thought that I was the only one who took all that stuff serious!
     
  7. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Ahhhh, I sure do miss Germany :)) SIGH. This do, bring back some nice memories of my time there :))
     
  8. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Quite welcome friend. :)) Glad your here.
     
  9. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

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    Heh heh, well, you AINT learnin der Konigs Englisch, thats fer sure, thats fer dang sure. :))
     
  10. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    Bobby I've got ton's of stuff on Louisiana troops in the Civil War.

    [​IMG]
    Recognize this? One of the more famous of the photographs from Antietam. These are dead Louisianan's from Starke's Brigade, Jackson's Corps, along Hagerstown Pike.

    Starke's Brigade at Sharpsburg
    Brigadier General William E. Starke (KIA)
    1st Louisiana: Lt. Col. Michael Nolan (w), Capt. W. E. Moore
    2d Louisiana: Col. Jesse M. Williams (w)
    9th Louisiana: Col. Leroy A. Stafford (w), Lt. Col. William R. Peck
    10th Louisiana: Capt. Henry D. Monier
    15th Louisiana: Col. Edmund Pendleton
    Coppens' (First Louisiana Zouaves) Battalion: Col. G. Coppens

    [​IMG]

    Keith Rocco painting showing the action.

    excerpt from Coppen's Battalion describing the action.

    "The Battle of Shaprsburg began at first light with Federal artillery firing on the brigades of Douglass, Trimble, and Hays. The Second Louisiana Brigade held its reserve position, until finally called upon to help repel the assault of General Hooker’s Division. Starke’s men came down the west side of the sunken road, through a small patch of woods, and crashed headlong into the attacking Federals. General Starke fell dead, pierced by three balls, as both sides unleashed tremendous volleys into each other. It was once again the tough western regiments of the Iron Brigade that the Louisianans battled in the West Woods and along the Hagerstown Pike this day. Although their stand was defiant, the overwhelming pressure of the Union numbers forced the Brigade to fall back to new positions near the Dunker Church where the remained for the remainder of the battle. The Zouave Battalion which had marched so proudly out of New Orleans with 600 men, now presented only 12 men present for duty. As the lists of the casualties from the bloodiest day in American history were compiled, the name of Lieutenant Colonel Gaston Coppens was numbered with the dead. Marie Alfred Coppens was to remain in command of the Zouaves as the retreat south began."

    [​IMG]

    This is another well known painting of Antietam. This is the "Iron Brigdes" charge mentioned in the above excerpt.

    Then you have Hay's Louisiana "Tigers" at the Cornfield........
     
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  11. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Have you read "Lee's Tigers"? It's a great study of the 12 infantry regiments and 2 battalions of Louisiana troops that were sent to fight in the Army of Northern Virginia. Terry Jones is the author. That would make a great HBO 10 part mini-series. Twelve thousand men made up that contingent that was organized into two brigades. At Appomatox, about 460 were still on the active rolls. Life was hard back then.
     
  12. formerjughead

    formerjughead The Cooler King

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    Insurrectionist propaganda!!!!:)
     
  13. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    No propaganda pal, just gospel....

    We dare defend our rights, and we'll do it again if need be.
     
  14. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    Have you guys ever heard of the Battle of Cherbourg in 1864 between the Kearsarge 'Union) and the CSS ALABAMA (South) .
    The Alabama was being repaired in the French Harbour when it was caught by the Union ship . (the South got some of their gold from French aristocrats) . The Alabama was eventually sunk but their crew was rescued by an English yacht and the crew escaped to England!

    [​IMG]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Cherbourg_(1864)

    [​IMG]


    about a dozne of the crew have been recovered by American and french divers in 2007 and were eventually buried in Mobile at the Magnolia cemetery

    Sailor's remains from CSS Alabama buried in Mobile ceremony | al.com

    [​IMG]
     
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  15. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Yes I have read about it many times, the last battle for the Confederacy's most famous commerce raider. Few know that after the war, the US sued the UK and won over damages caused by commerce raiders constructed and outfitted in England, and partially crewed by British subjects. Those raiders wreaked havoc on the US commercial shipping in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

    Thanks for posting it!
     
  16. Hilts

    Hilts Member

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    There ya go!!

    You try and do someone a favour and then bam!! Some sleezebag lawyer crawls out of the swamp! :mad:
     
  17. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    No I haven't read it but based upon your recommendation I just bought it on Amazon.com and will be reading it this weekend. Thanks!
     
  18. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    Same here Skipper, ditto what Bobby said, and thanks. I have a bunch of information I've been assembling on France's influence on the war, specifically for you Skipper. I'll post it as soon.

    Your posts also brings to mind the CSS Shenandoah. She fired the last shot of the Civil War on 28 June 1865, near the Aleutians. When she learned of the surrender of the confederacy, from a passing British ship, she sailed 9,000 miles to surrender at Liverpool, England.

    from Wikipedia:

    "Captain Waddell and the crew knew returning to a US port would mean facing a Union court with a Northern perspective of the war. They correctly predicted the risk of being tried in a US court and hanged as pirates. This later showed to be accurate. Commerce Raiders were not included in the reconciliation and amnesty that Confederate soldiers were given. Captain Raphael Semmes of CSS Alabama escaped charges of piracy by surrendering May 1, 1865 as a Ground General under General Johnston. Semmes's former sailors surrendered as artillerymen.
    After the surrender of Shenandoah to the British, the British had to decide what to do with the Confederate crew, knowing the consequences of piracy charges."

    [​IMG]

    CSS Shenandoah in dry dock in Williamstown, Victoria, Australia, 1865.


    [​IMG]

    Battle Ensign of the CSS Shenandoah

    "The battle ensign of CSS Shenandoah is unique amongst all of the flags of the Confederate States of America as it was the only Confederate flag to circumnavigate the Earth during the Confederacy, and it was the last Confederate flag to be lowered by a combatant unit in the Civil War (Liverpool, UK, on November 6, 1865)."
     
  19. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    Go for the extra information USMC! I love this time period.
     
  20. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

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    Will do mon Skipper :salute: Did you notice the tie in to your post on the CSS Alabama?

    Skipper posted:
    USMCPrice posted:


    Thanks!
     

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