Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

Tags:
  1. Mussolini

    Mussolini Gaming Guru Patron  

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2000
    Messages:
    5,647
    Likes Received:
    531
    Location:
    Festung Colorado
    Just finished Cornelius Ryans 'The Longest Day'. A very good read though not quite on the same level as 'A Bridge Too Far' but I did recognize a lot of the scenes that are in the movie when reading them in the book. Now its either onto 'The Last Battle' or yet-to-be-determined book!
     
  2. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2014
    Messages:
    3,090
    Likes Received:
    330
    Location:
    New England
    I recently re-read The Last Battle I found it quite enjoyable. He will forever be unmatched in prose.
     
  3. Half Track

    Half Track Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Every year, Wilson College in Chambersburg has a used book sale to help provide access to legal services for low-income people in the community. This year it is May 18, 19 and 20. They have thousands of used books. The paperbacks are fifty cents and the average price of a hard cover is about $3.00. It was packed with people today and I headed directly for the table marked “military.” I picked these up for a total of $7.00. The book by Ian W. Toll received terrific reviews from what I have read and I was happy to find it because I was considering buying it new from the book store. It was $4.00.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Half Track

    Half Track Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Just in case the above image should disappear after a period of time, which has happened in the past, even with postimage.org, the four are: Six Frigates by Ian W. Toll, Miracle at Midway by Gordon W. Prange, The Two-Ocean War by Samuel Eliot Morison and The Battle of Leyte Gulf by Edwin P. Hoyt.
     
  5. Fas

    Fas New Member

    Joined:
    May 17, 2018
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm reading now the extraordinary life of Benjamin Button
     
  6. Clementine

    Clementine Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    904
    Likes Received:
    252
    Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in WWII by Arthur Herman. I've been asked to lead a book discussion on it at the library next month.
     
    rkline56 likes this.
  7. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,198
    Likes Received:
    2,022
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Hi Clem! Glad to see you posting again. Hope your discussion is successful. Be sure to let us know how it goes.
     
  8. lwd

    lwd Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    11,683
    Likes Received:
    1,108
    Location:
    Michigan
    Wages of Destruction would provide an interesting counter point in that discussion. Not a fast read though I bogged down about half way through but the pre war part is perhaps the most important.
     
  9. Phantom of the Ruhr

    Phantom of the Ruhr Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada
    I'm now reading Stay the Rising Sun: The True Story of USS Lexington, Her Valiant Crew, and Changing the Course of WWII by Phil Keith.
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    I've heard good things. Still haven't cracked my copy, other projects and reality intervene.
     
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
  12. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,877
    Likes Received:
    1,518
    Location:
    Perfidious Albion
    The Tanks of TOG.
    Andrew Hills.

    9781974680375.jpg

    I think it may well be excellent, but as it's rather flimsily printed-on-demand & is a bit of a brick, I've stopped until one of those plastic covers arrives to toughen the thing up a bit.
    Large & slightly flawed.
    Not unlike its subject.
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Did WSC interfere with tank development in WWII?
     
  14. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    5,877
    Likes Received:
    1,518
    Location:
    Perfidious Albion
    He wasn't that bad, actually. Reasonable eye for delegation in deeper technical fields by WW2.
    Certainly many other far more peculiar influences were allowed to stroll in and throw spanners about based largely on who they knew over what.
    Always thought the TOG project was inspired - sitting all those old buggers and their potentially powerful influences in a self-contained corner, distracting them from excessive interference in the real business.
    The book may disabuse me of that, but I doubt it. Am however very intrigued by how Ricardo viewed the whole business. Certainly no duffer...
     
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    9,294
    Likes Received:
    1,321
    Thanks, that was something I've often meant to ask about and never had the chance.
     
  16. Phantom of the Ruhr

    Phantom of the Ruhr Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada
    Gotta love the artwork on those old paperbacks! :D
     
  17. Clementine

    Clementine Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    Messages:
    904
    Likes Received:
    252
    Thank you. Just been very busy, but I've missed all of you!
     
  18. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    13,198
    Likes Received:
    2,022
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I'm trying to decide which Flying Tigers book I should buy. There's a new one by Sam Kleiner and a 2016 book by Daniel Ford. Any recommendations?
     
  19. Phantom of the Ruhr

    Phantom of the Ruhr Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2008
    Messages:
    422
    Likes Received:
    63
    Location:
    Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada
    Now halfway through The Ship that Held the Line: The USS Hornet and the First Year of the Pacific War by Lisle A. Rose.
     
    Half Track likes this.
  20. White Flight

    White Flight Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    439
    Likes Received:
    33
    Recently completed Biggest Brother, The Life of Major Dick Winters, the Man Who Led the Band of Bothers, by Larry Alexander. Another good writing on the history of the Screaming Eagles, Easy Company. The concept of creating the biography was spun from his employer. Alexander mailed his first contact to Winters using his home address for the return address. Winters called the newsroom days later opening the convo, questioning where he lived in Ephrata Pennsylvania. Winters had lived on the same street as Alexander. They had common acquaintances.

    Briefly, having completed his tour of duty in January 1946, Winters received his callback in the onset of the Korean War. Determined to stay out of the conflict, he made an unannounced visit to the Pentagon in search of the officer in charge of personnel. Winters served under General McAuliffe during the Battle of the Bulge. Presenting his case as having served his obligations, McAuliffe asked Winters if the graduating officers from West Point could serve as Battalion Commanders. In the absence of experience, Winters' answer of no, came with the realization of why he was needed.

    In the historical research for the book Band of Bothers, Stephen Ambrose, Winters, veterans and significant others, returned to the sites and old battlefields. Upon their approach to Foy, Ambrose asked Mr. Winters to provide details on how the conflict ensued. Winters reflected on the location of suppressing fire, pointing out the positions of two .30 caliber machine guns with a third locating where Mrs. Ambrose was standing. Moira tilled the soil recovering spent .30 caliber casings. The trip included a visit to a nemesis, retired Colonel Fredrick von der Heydte, who led the 6th Fallschirmjager Regiment. As Winters unfolded his map across a coffee table, the Colonel recognized it immediately. Details on events flowed and circulated in the room through the translator, the Colonel’s daughter.

    Currently reading The Liberator, One World War II Soldier’s 500-Day Odyssey from the Beaches of Sicily to the Gates of Dachau, by Alex Kershaw.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2018

Share This Page