Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

Tags:
  1. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    14,284
    Likes Received:
    2,603
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Probably so. Regardless of her impact and her poor choices, her trial was a joke. Seems as though the judge was a better prosecutor than the government lawyer.
     
    Carronade likes this.
  2. Thumpalumpacus

    Thumpalumpacus Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2021
    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    66
    Threw it out today. Too many errors of detail, author clearly didn't do his homework. 275 pages' reading wasted.
     
    OpanaPointer likes this.
  3. Bryan Kimmey

    Bryan Kimmey New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2022
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    10
    If you want an accurate, fiction set in the Battle of Manilla and post ww-2 tokyo about the events of the missing Honjo Masamune:
    Robot or human?

    I think it's pretty good. Give it a try. You might be surprised.
     
    OpanaPointer likes this.
  4. xcburger

    xcburger recruit

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    3
    907E608D-1598-4181-98D7-78F0E3284C0A.jpeg Currently reading ‘A Better Comrade You Will Never Find’ - Helmut Schiebel .

    A Better Comrade You Will Never Find presents Eastern Front experiences of Helmut Schiebel from 1941 to the end of WW II. The author took part in the invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941 as a member of the 43 Motorcycle Infantry Battalion of the 13 Panzer Division. In September he left for an Officer Candidate course in Germany, returning as a Leutnant and platoon leader to the division s reconnaissance battalion at the end of April 1942. He was wounded at the end of June and retuned to Russia in September 1943.

    On the way to the 18 Panzer Division, he found out that the division was being dissolved and opted to transfer to the antitank branch. He arrived at Panzerjager Abteilung 88 in October 1943 where he was given a manual for antitank troops and soon after became a platoon commander on a Marder tank destroyer. After heavy losses, in November 1943 the unit was transferred to Mielau Poland, where it trained on and was equipped with the heavy Hornisse tank destroyer. When the battalion was sent to the Eastern Front in mid-February 1944, the author stayed behind to receive missing equipment and additional personnel. Panzerjager Abteilung 88 was trapped in the Kamenez-Podolsk wandering pocket, and its actions there are recounted through the eyes of some other soldiers.

    Just recently completed reading
     

    Attached Files:

    Slipdigit, Riter and ColHessler like this.
  5. Riter

    Riter Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Messages:
    934
    Likes Received:
    242
    Finished Whitlock's The Rock of Anzio and now on Dance of Death.
     
  6. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2017
    Messages:
    1,576
    Likes Received:
    866
    Location:
    Chambersburg Pennsylvania
    The Day Of Battle by Rick Atkinson, copyright 2007, 588 pages softcover. The war in Sicily and Italy, 1943–1944. Volume two of The Liberation Trilogy. I am only on page 50 but find it to be very good. I had started it back in 2019 and couldn’t read anymore for quite a while and then put it back on the bookshelf until yesterday.
     
    OpanaPointer likes this.
  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    18,014
    Likes Received:
    5,609
    I did the Patton Tour when I was stationed in Sicily. Better equipped for that now, of course, but I won't be traveling any time soon.
     
    Half Track likes this.
  8. Riter

    Riter Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Messages:
    934
    Likes Received:
    242
    I couldn't read Prisoner of Stalin. It's the writer's style. Onto No Better Comrade (or sometihng like that about panzer jager (Hornisse/Nashorn).
     
  9. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2009
    Messages:
    14,284
    Likes Received:
    2,603
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Japan's Gestapo by Mark Felton. Hard to believe some of the tortures (besides beatings) the Japanese employed. Scary.
     
    Half Track likes this.
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    18,014
    Likes Received:
    5,609
    Kaitempai were rough. If you can find it try Quinn's Shanghai Circus. Seriously crazy shit.
     
  11. Biak

    Biak Boy from Illinois Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    8,976
    Likes Received:
    2,439
    I keep meaning to get back to "Strangers in a Strange Land" but made it up to where she's hovering and waiting then things took a sh.... Hopefully we'll get a big ass snowstorm and I'll be house bound for a few days and finish the book.
     
  12. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    18,014
    Likes Received:
    5,609
    Hovering over Michael?
     
  13. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2008
    Messages:
    18,014
    Likes Received:
    5,609
    BTW, the revised edition of the book isn't worth any extra money. I could barely notice the added material.
     
  14. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2006
    Messages:
    6,300
    Likes Received:
    1,918
    Location:
    Perfidious Albion
    resizejpg.jpg
     
  15. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    20,781
    Likes Received:
    3,016
    Location:
    Stirling, Scotland
    Currently enthralled by this. Love the cloak-and-dagger stuff.
    20231113_012520.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2023
    OpanaPointer likes this.
  16. ColHessler

    ColHessler Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2010
    Messages:
    1,264
    Likes Received:
    414
    I just finished reading it, under it's original title The Simple Sounds of Freedom. Talk about your epic journeys.
     
    OpanaPointer likes this.
  17. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    9,020
    Likes Received:
    1,814
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    I’ve always thought that this book would make a great basis for a 10 part HBO miniseries.
     
    Bryan Kimmey and ColHessler like this.
  18. Riter

    Riter Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Messages:
    934
    Likes Received:
    242
    Finished John McManus' Island Infernos and now onto the last book of his trilogy on the US Army in the Pacific, To The End of The Earth.
     
    OpanaPointer likes this.
  19. Riter

    Riter Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2020
    Messages:
    934
    Likes Received:
    242
    Several things I learned from it. First is why the Soviets called the Germans Hitlerites. Socialist brothers are not supposed to fight each other because it flies in the face of "workers of the world unite!" Hence the Soviets reference to Germans not as Nazis but Hiterites. Second, that awards/medals are property of the state and if you fall from favor, you could be stirpped of them. I heard of people losing their awards when they became persona-no-grata, but the actual confiscation of the physical award was revelational.
     
    ColHessler likes this.
  20. ColyH

    ColyH Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2022
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    11
    Germany's National Socialism and the Soviet Union's Socialism is not the same thing.

    Back in 1917 the United States did something similar to stripping soldiers with Medal of Honors handed out during the Civil War although many of them were not deserved to began with. An entire regiment was awarded the MOH for re-enlisting, one soldier received the medal for putting out a campfire, but the all time least deserving of the MOH was Asa Bird Gardiner who received the medal because he simply asked for one.
     

Share This Page