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World War 2 - Learning Zone

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Javey74, May 31, 2018.

  1. Javey74

    Javey74 Member

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    2.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2018
  2. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    The refute our statements. You have yet to make any attempt to do so.


    Sigh...We knew it was not written by you, as you lack the intellect required to form original thought. I was hoping that you at least had the intellect necessary to support your posts by doing some research...But, sadly, that is also beyond your ken.


    When you have refuted our statements, only then will we be knocked off...Until then, I will continue to enjoy my view in a McClellan saddle.


    Pulled up...Reacted strangely? What...replying with sound logical statements is a strange response...You must have only frequented Pokemon forums prior to landing here.
     
  3. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Yeah, I thought it was past someone's nap time...Likely needed a nappy change too.
     
  4. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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  5. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Okay, since Dick-Waggler is waggling his TV docudramas as evidence of his "research" I guess I'll post some of my research. For Cracking Hitler's Atlantic Wall (I know, it's one of those silly book thingies) it was:

    Sources

    Primary
    Allied Landing Craft of World War II (originally published in 1944 with a subsequent
    supplement as ON1226-Allied Landing Craft and Ships), Annapolis, MD: Naval
    Institute Press, reprint 1985.
    Army Operational Research Group. Report No. 16, Air and Ground Support in the
    Assault of Boulogne.

    _______. Report No. 261 Casualties and Effects of Fire Support on the British Beaches
    at Normandy
    , 21 April 1945.
    ________. Report No. 292, Comparison of British and American Areas in Normandy in
    terms of Fire Support and its Effects
    . 14 August 1945.
    Canadian Section, General Headquarters, 2nd Echelon. 99/15/STATS/1/A3, Casualties-
    Enemy Action.

    Canadian Army Headquarters (AHQ). Report No. 40, The Campaign In North-West
    Europe, Information From German Sources
    . 28 April 1951.
    ________. Report No. 41, The German Defences in the Courseulles-St. Aubin Area of the
    Normandy Coast
    . 20 July 1951.
    ________. Report No. 42, The Preliminary Planning For Operation “OVERLORD”:
    Some Aspects of the Preparations for an Allied Re-entry to North-West Europe,
    1940-1944.
    5 March 1952.
    ________. No. 54, The Assault and Subsequent Operations of 3 Cde Inf Div and 2 Cdn
    Armd Bde, 6-30 June.
    30 June 1952.
    Canadian Military Engineers. Customs and Traditions of the CME. A-JS-007-003/JD-
    001, Annex A – Canadian Military Engineer Memorials, n.d.
    Canadian Military Headquarters (CMHQ). Report No. 147. The Assault and subsequent
    Operations of 3 Cdn Inf Div and 2 Cdn Armd Bde, 6-30 Jun 44.
    3 December
    1945.
    Commander U.S. Naval Forces Europe. The Invasion of Normandy, Operation
    NEPTUNE, Administrative History, United States Naval Forces in Europe 1940-
    1946
    . Vol. V, London: n.p., n.d.
    Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Commonwealth War Graves Commission
    The London Gazette, various.
    The National Archives (UK):
    ADM 179/458. Western Task Force, 1944 Mar-May.
    ADM 179/504. Operation “NEPTUNE”, Report by Naval Commander, Eastern
    Task Force, Enclosure “C”, Report of Proceedings of Force “S”.

    ADM 179/505. Operation “NEPTUNE”, Report of the Naval Commander,
    Eastern Task Force, Enclosure “D”, Report of Proceedings of Force
    “G”.

    ADM 179/506. Operation “NEPTUNE”, Report by Naval Commander, Eastern
    Task Force, Enclosure “E”, Report of Proceedings of Force “J”.

    AVIA 22/456. Armoured fighting vehicles: conversions and modifications, 1942-
    1945.
    AVIA 22/469. Armoured fighting vehicles: monthly returns of deliveries, 1939-
    1941.
    AVIA 22/576. Blacker Bombard (297 mm Spigot-Mortar) weapon: requirements,
    1941-1943.
    AVIA 22/511-514. Monthly Statistical Summaries nos. 1-46, 1942-1946.
    AVIA 22/515-519. Statistical Summaries nos. 1-16 and Statistical Abstract,
    December 1940-1945.
    DEFE 2/40. War Diary, No. 4 Commando.
    WO 162/297. Dieppe Casualties, 28 August 1942
    WO171/102. 21 Army Group G.S., January-April 1944.
    WO 171/155. Appendix ‘A’ to R.A. Branch Headquarters 21st Army Group War
    Diary May 1944.

    WO 171/234. Second Army R.A. Landing Tables.
    WO 171/863. Staffordshire Yeomanry War Diary, Jan.-Dec. 1944.
    WO 171/864. 2 County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons), Jun.-Dec.
    1944.
    WO 171/1797. No. 1 Assault Brigade War Diary, June-December 1944.
    WO 171/1800. No. 5 Assault Regiment War Diary, June-December 1944.
    WO 179/409. 3rd British Infantry Division, Operation Order No. 1, OVERLORD,
    14 May 1944.
    WO 205/405. 21st Army Group G (Operations), August, September 1944.
    WO 205/636. A.F.V. States, Summaries at HQ 21 Army Group, June-July.
    WO 205/1120. Report by Brig. Watkinson on Work of Assault RE in the Invasion.
    WO 205/1159. 79 Armoured Division Final Report, 1943 Apr.-1945 July.
    WO 205/1160. The Story of the 1st Assault Brigade Royal Engineers, 1943-1945.
    WO 205/1170. Chief Engineer 21 Army Group, R.E. Report on the Battle of
    Normandy, 6th June – 5th July 1944.
    WO 218/65 No. 3 Commando War Diary, June 1944.
    WO 218/69, No. 6 Commando War Diary, June 1944.
    WO 291/246. AORG Report No. 264, Opposition Encountered on the British
    Beaches in Normandy on D-Day, ND, but apparently 1945.
    Royal Navy. British Vessels Lost at Sea, 1939-45. London: HMSO, 1947.
    U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Combined Arms Research Library
    Digital Library. Conference on Landing Assaults, 1 July 1943.
    ________Headquarters V Corps, Operations Plan NEPTUNE, 26 March
    1944.

    ________. Notes on German Obstacles and Field Works, August 1943.
    ________. Operation Plan No. 2-44 of the Western Naval Task Force, Allied Naval
    Expeditionary Force
    , 21 April 1944.
    U.S. Army Engineer Agency for Resources Inventories. Landmine and Countermine
    Warfare: North Africa, World War II.
    Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government
    Printing Office, 19972.
    U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA):
    RG 38, Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations,
    Operations Order No. 1-44, Western Naval Task Force, Assault Force
    “O” (Task Force One Two Four), Naval Combat Demolition Group, 31
    May 1944.
    ________. Operations Order No. 3-44, Western Naval Task Force, Assault Force
    “U” (Task Force One Two Five), Naval Combat Demolitions Group, 15
    May 1944.
    RG 319, Records of the Army Staff, Historical Division, Background Files-Study
    “American Forces in Action”, 1943-1946, Omaha Beachhead, Boxes 1
    and 2.
    RG 331, Allied Operational and Occupation HQ, World War II, SHAEF, General
    Staff G-1 Division, Administrative Section Decimal Files, Box 41,
    704/5 First US Army Casualty Reports, Vol. I (15 June-19 July 1944).
    21st Army Group Casualty (‘A’ SITREPS) Reports, Vol. I (10 June-22 July
    1944).
    RG338, ETO Secretary General Staff, Statistics Section, Historical and Statistical
    Reports, 1944-1945, Box 3, D-Day Studies and Statistical Reports.
    RG 407, Entry 427, Records of the Adjutant General, Adjutant General’s Reports.
    _______. Box XXXXX, 304-1.3, 4th Infantry Division G-1 Journal File, June
    1944.
    ________. Box 5909, 301-INF (16)-0.3, 16th Infantry Report of Operations, June
    1944.
    ________. Box 5931, 301-INF (16) 6-0.1, "History Medical Det".
    ________. Box 16703, ARBN-741-0.1 to ARBN-741-0.16, 741st Tank Battalion
    Unit Journal June-August 1944.
    ________. Box 16706, ARBN-743-0.3 to ARBN-743-3.2, 743rd Tank Battalion,
    June 1944
    .
    ________. Pre-Invasion Planning. Box 24309, Folder 209, Overlord Conference,
    21 December 1943.

    RG 498, ETOUSA Historical Division Files. Box 8, Folder 44, Beaches.
    ________. Box 44, Folder ADM 220, Commander Assault Force “O” Western
    Naval Task Force Action Report Assault on Colleville-Vierville Sector
    Coast of Normandy

    ________. Box 73, Folder 359A, Notes on UTAH Beach and the 1st Engineer
    Special Brigade (compiled 20 October-7 November 1944).
    ________. Box 117, Folder 493, Operation Report NEPTUNE, OMAHA Beach,
    Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group
    , 30 September 1944.
    ________. Box 117A, Folder 493, Operation Report NEPTUNE, OMAHA Beach,
    Provisional Engineer Special Brigade Group
    , Photographs 30 September
    1944.
    U.S. War Department, Military Intelligence Service. German Coastal Defenses, Special
    Series, No. 15. Washington, D.C.: War Department, 15 June 1943.
     
  6. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Contd.

    Secondary
    Alanbrooke, Lord. War Diaries, 1939-1945 Field Marshal Lord Alanbrooke. Berkeley,
    CA: University of California Press, 2001.
    Arsicaud, Thierry. “The Modified British System”,
    Notes on the "Modified British System" used on the European Theatre of Operations during the WWII.
    Balkoski, Joseph. OMAHA Beach, D-Day. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2004.
    ________. UTAH Beach. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2005.
    Beck, Alfred M., et al, The Corps of Engineers: the War Against Germany. Washington,
    D.C.: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Gov. Print. Off. 1985.
    Beck, Benjamin S. “War Diary 341 Battery, 8th Field regiment, R.A.”,
    http://web.ukonline.co.uk/benjaminbeck/batterydiary.htm, © Benjamin S. Beck,
    2000.
    Berger, Sid. Breaching Fortress Europe: The Story of U.S. Engineers in Normandy on D-
    Day
    . Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Pub. Co, 1994.
    Bernage, George. Gold Juno Sword. Bayeux: Editions Heimdal, 2003.
    ________. OMAHA Beach. Bayeux: Editions Heimdal, 2002.
    van der Bijl, Nicholas. No. 10 (Inter-Allied) Commando 1942-45: Britain's Secret
    Commando
    . Oxford: Osprey, 2006.
    van der Bijl, Nicholas and Lee Johnson. The Royal Marines, 1939-93. Elite Series, 57,
    London: Osprey, 1994.
    Birt, Raymond. XXII Dragoons 1760-1945, the Story of a Regiment, Aldershot: Gale &
    Polden Limited, 1950.
    Blacker, Barnaby. The Adventures and Inventions of Stewart Blacker Aviation Pioneer
    and Weapons Inventor,
    Barnsley: Pen & Sword, 2006.
    Buckingham, William F., D-Day, the First 72 Hours. London: Tempus, 2004.
    Burn, Lambton. “Down Ramps!”, Saga of the Eighth Armada. London: Carroll &
    Nicholson Ltd., 1947.
    Campbell, John P. Dieppe Revisited: A Documentary Investigation. London: Frank Cass,
    1993.
    Canadian Forces, Department of National Defence. Customs and Traditions of the CME,
    A-JS-007-003/JD-001, Annex A – Canadian Military Engineer Memorials.
    Chamberlain, Peter, “Armoured Recovery Vehicles” in Duncan Crow, Ed., British and
    Commonwealth AFVs, 1940-46.
    Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1972.
    Chamberlain, Peter and Chris Ellis, “Churchill and Sherman Specials” in Duncan Crow,
    Ed., British and Commonwealth AFVs, 1940-46. Garden City, NY: Doubleday,
    1972.
    Commander U.S. Naval Forces Europe. The Invasion of Europe, Operation Neptune,
    Administrative History, United States Force in Europe 1940-1946, Vol. V.
    London: n.p., n.d.
    Conron, Brandon. A History of the First Hussars Regiment, 1856-1980. London, Ont: B.
    Conron, 1981.
    Copp, Terry. Fields of Fire: The Canadians in Normandy. Toronto: University of
    Toronto Press, 2003.
    Daniels, Maj. Michael J. Innovation in the Face of Adversity: Major-General Sir Percy
    Hobart and the 79th Armoured Division (British)
    , MMAS Thesis, Fort Leavenworth, KS: U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 2003.
    Delaforce, Patrick. Churchill's Secret Weapons: The Story of Hobart's Funnies. Barnsley:
    Pen & Sword Military Books, 2007.
    D’Este, Carlo. Decision in Normandy. New York: Dutton, 1983.
    Doubler, Michael D. Closing with the Enemy, How Gis fought the War in Europe, 1944-
    1945.
    Lwrence: University Press of Kansas, 1994.
    Duncan, N. W., C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O. “The 79th Armoured Division” in British and
    Commonwealth AFVs 1940-46
    , Duncan Crow, editor. Garden City, New York:
    Doubleday & Company, Inc., 1972.
    Dunphie, Christopher and Garry Johnson. GOLD Beach, Inland from King – June 1944,
    Battleground Europe. Barsley, England: Pen & Sword, 1999.
    Eisenhower, Dwight D. The Papers of Dwight David Eisenhower, The War Years,
    Volume III
    . Alfred D. Chandler, Jr., editor, Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins
    Press. 1970.
    Ellis, L.F., G. W. G. Allen, A. E. Warhurst, and James Robb, Victory in the West. Vol.1,
    The Battle of Normandy
    . London: H.M.S.O., London, 1962.
    Ewing, Joseph. 29 Let’s Go: A History of the 29th Division in World War II. Washington,
    D.C.: Infantry Journal Press, 1948.
    Fletcher, David. “The Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers”, NP, ND, unpublished
    monograph.
    Ford, Ken. D-Day 1944. (4), Gold & Juno Beaches. Osprey campaign series, 112. Oxford: Osprey, 2002.
    French, David. “Colonel Blimp and the British Army: British Divisional Commanders in
    the War against Germany, 1939-1945”, The English Historical Review, Vol. 111, No. 444 (November 1996), pp. 1182-1201.
    ________. Raising Churchill’s Army, the British Army and the War against Germany
    1919-1945.
    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
    Friends of the Green Howards, The Regiment’s VC Holders, “WO II Stanley E Hollis, VC”, http://www.greenhowards.org.uk/html-files/vcgc-hollis.htm
    Greenfield, Kent Roberts, Robert R. Palmer, and Bell I. Wiley. The Organization of
    Ground Combat Troops
    . Washington, D.C.: Historical Division, Department of
    the Army, 1947.
    Green Howards Museum. “W O II Stanley E. Hollis, VC”,
    http://www.greenhowards.org.uk/vcgc-hollis.php
    Harrison, Gordon A. Cross-Channel Attack. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military
    History, United States Army, 1951.
    Hogg, Ian V. German Artillery of World War II, London: Greenhill Books, 1997.
    Hunnicutt, R.P. Sherman, a History of the American Medium Tank. Novato, Calif.:
    Presidio Press, 1978.
    Inglis, Major General John D. “The Work of the Royal Engineers in North-West
    Europe”, R.U.S.I. Journal, May 1946.
    Kaufmann, J. E. and H. W. Kaufmann. Fortress Third Reich. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo
    Press, 2003.
    Kilvert-Jones, Tim. OMAHA Beach, V Corps’ Battle for the Normandy Beachead,
    Battleground, Europe. Barnsley, England: Pen & Sword, 1999.
    ________. SWORD Beach, British 3rd Infantry Division/27th Armoured Brigade,
    Battleground Europe. Barnsley, England: Pen & Sword, 2001.
    Kindell, Don. Casualty Lists of the Royal Navy and Dominion Navies, 1922-present,
    Family History - Royal Navy personnel killed and died 1914-2008, © 2008.
    Lamb, Richard. Montgomery in Europe 1943-1945. New York: Franklin Watts, 1984.
    Lee, David. Beachhead Assault. London: Greenhill Books, 2004.
    Lewis, Adrian R. OMAHA Beach, A Flawed Victory. Chapel Hill: University of North
    Carolina Press, 2001.
    Little, Sgt. P. “History of the Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE)”, SITREP, 2
    Canadian Field Engineers Newsletter
    , Vol. 5, Issue 3, (June 2005).
    Macksey, Major Kenneth J. Armoured Crusader: a biography of Major-General Sir
    Percy Hobart
    . London: Hutchinson, 1967.
    McNish, Robin. Iron Division: the History of the 3rd Division 1809-1989. London: Ian
    Allen, 1990.
    M.G. Cars. “Calling All Arms!! Experience at M.G. During Wartime”,
    http://www.mgcars.org.uk/mgcc/sf/000101.htm.
    Mills-Roberts, Derek. Clash by Night, A Commando Chronicle. London: W. Kimber,
    1956.
     
  7. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Contd.

    Morison, Samuel Eliot. The Invasion of France and Germany 1944-1945, History of the
    United States Naval Operations in World War II, Vol. XI. New York: Little,
    Brown, and Company, (Inc), 1957.
    Neillands, Robin. The Battle of Normandy 1944. London: Cassell, 2002.
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    War of 1939-1945.
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    O’Dell, James Douglas. “Joint-Service Beach Obstacle Demolition in World War II”,
    Engineer, April-June 2005.
    Orsbourn, M. E. The Shortest Gap: Story of the Armoured Engineers Vehicles of Royal
    Engineers
    . NP, ND.
    Parsch, Andreas. Directory of U. S. Military Rockets and Missiles,
    Directory of U.S. Military Rockets and Missiles
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    Committee 10, Officers Advanced
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    Shropshire Light Infantry (85th Foot) in the Campaign in N.W. Europe 1944-
    1945
    . Oxford: Basil Blackwood, 1947.
    Reynolds, Major General Michael. Eagles and Bulldogs in Normandy, 1944. Havertown:
    PA, Casemate, 2003.
    Rommel, Erwin, and Basil Henry Liddell Hart. The Rommel Papers. New York: Da Capo
    Press, 1982.
    Saunders, Tim. GOLD Beach-JIG, JIG Sector and West-June 1944, Battleground Europe.
    Barnsley, England: Pen & Sword, 2002.
    Scarfe, Norman. Assault Division: A History of the 3rd Division from the Invasion of
    Normandy to the Surrender of Germany
    . London: Collins, 1947.
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    PA: 1993.
    ________. German Defensive Batteries & Gun Emplacements on the Normandy Beaches,
    Invasion: D-Day June 6, 1944.

    _______. Guns of the Atlantic Wall. Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 1998.
    79th Armoured Division. Memorial Album, np. nd.
    Shilleto, Carl. Pegasus Bridge, Merville Battery, Battleground Europe. Barnsley,
    England: Pen & Sword, 1999.
    ________. UTAH Beach, St Mère Église, VII Corps, 82nd and 101st Airborne Divisions,
    Battleground Europe. Barnsley, England: Pen & Sword, 2001.
    Shoulars, Julius, “Julius Shoulars recalls his time on the Beaches of Normandy before
    and after he landed at Omaha Beach on June 7, 1944”, Witness to War Foundation, http://www.witness-to-war.org
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    Slee, Jeff. “The Story of 45 Royal Marine Command, Combinedops.com.
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    Larry Noel, “LCTs and LCT (A)s in Normandy D-Day, June 6, 1944”
    Bill O’Neill, “D-Day, June 6, 1944 as Seen from US LCT (6) 544”
    Joe Suozzo, “LCT’s at Normandy, Force “U””
    Zaloga, Steven.. US Armored Funnies, US Specialized Armored Vehicles in the ETO in
    World War II.
    Hong Kong: Concord Publications Co., 2005.
    Zaloga, Steven and Howard Gerrard. D-Day 1944. 1, Omaha Beach. Campaign, 100.
    Oxford: Osprey, 2003.
    ________. D-Day 1944. 2, Utah Beach & the US Airborne Landings. Campaign, 104.
    Oxford: Osprey, 2004.
    Zaloga, Steven and Hugh Johnson, Lee Ray, and Chris Taylor. The Atlantic Wall 1,
    France.
    Fortress, 63. Oxford: Osprey, 2007.
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    Zetterling, Niklas. Normandy 1944, German Military Organization, Combat Power and
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    Ziegelmann, Fritz. “The 352nd Infantry Division (MS B-432)” in David Isby, Ed., The
    German Army at D-Day
    . London: Greenhill Books, 2004.
     
  8. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Damn, I didn't realize what an ignoramus I was...no TV programs, but at least I had a video.
     
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  9. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Would you like to see my working bibliography for my current manuscript For Purposes of Service Test? It's only 25 pages long, but then I have not updated it for a while since I've been too busy writing.
     
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  10. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    For what its worth, my e-book folder takes up 37.9 gigabits and contains 2,215 files. That's not including the two rooms and several cardboard boxes of books.

    I am confident in my manhood and knowledge, so I am not going to waste my time typing them out.
     
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  11. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    That doesn't mean that you shouldn't give them due credit. By not listing a source you are essentially claiming the work for yourself.
     
  12. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member Patron  

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    Please tell me this thread will continue. I need some entertainment during the day. :D
     
  13. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    You know...In Javey's ridiculously long list of television mind-rot, I did not notice the quintessential television documentary series "The World At War."

    I can only presume that he is not interested in any actual learning, only mischievous gossip.
     
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  14. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    I'm just waiting for Javey to ascend his porcelain throne and start regaling us with his delusions of grandeur.
     
  15. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member Patron  

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    In our current social media climate how anyone can take things at face value never ceases to amaze me.
     
  16. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Because he is young and dumb...Hence his, don't question the "experts", no matter how wrong they are.
    Ahh, to be young again, life was so much simpler then.
     
  17. KJ Jr

    KJ Jr Well-Known Member Patron  

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    Ignorance is bliss
     
  18. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Forty-three isn't young. At forty-three I already had 11 years in working for DMSi/TNDA/TDI and had co-written three books with Trevor (Hitler's Last Gamble, Future Wars, and Attrition), wrote another with Curt Johnson (Artillery Hell), had written I don't know how many reports for Boeing, LMI, the Army, the Air Force, and I've lost track of how many other corporations and DOD agencies, including one report, which we were later told was directly instrumental with President Clinton agreeing to authorize the deployment of IFOR in the wake of the Dayton Accords, and participated in the research in primary and secondary sources for the Ardennes Combat Simulation Data Base, Kursk Data Base, Battle of Britain Data Base, and other conflict data bases. I also long ago learned not to trust "experts" and also to question my own assumptions before exploring a topic.

    "Young" isn't an excuse; its an age descriptor. "Dumb" may be accurate, but is curable by curiosity and a willingness to learn. Unfortunately, given his lack of personal growth since posting his egregious "Omaha" Who was responsible for the strategy?" thread and his out of control arrogance in this thread, I suspect any possibility of that occurring is remote. People who depend on TV for their history are like those who depend on Facebook for their political awareness. Asking them to develop critical thinking skills is like asking your cat to comment on Aristotelian logic.
     
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  19. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    Not it isn't. It's agony, at least for the rest of the moderately intelligent world. It's why I so often get myself in trouble for using intemperate language with the perennially clueless. Yes, you can fix ignorance, but only if the ignorant are willing to learn. Otherwise, they aren't ignorant, they're stupid and you can't fix stupid.
     
  20. Javey74

    Javey74 Member

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    Last edited: Jun 7, 2018

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